Hot answers tagged

25

Es ist ein Adjektiv in prädikativer Verwendung. Das ganze Prädikat lautet hier "ist hoch", welches das Subjekt "Der Berg" genauer beschreibt. In attributiver Verwendung wäre es "Der hohe Berg". In diesem Satz beschreibt hoch nicht das Verb sein, dann wäre es nämlich ein Adverb. Das Verb sein ist eine Kopula, welches das Subjekt mit der Satzaussage ...


24

In German, possessive pronouns adjust themselves according to the noun they are referring to. In your example, you have 'Hemden', which is plural and neutral in gender ('Das Hemd'). This changes 'Mein' to 'Meine'. The list for gender and numerus is: 'Mein' for singular masculin/neutral noun 'Meine' for a singular feminine noun 'Meine' for a plural ...


22

Welcome to the wonderful world of german separable verb prefixes :-) "Tempel ein" isn't a phrase but the result of separating the verb's prefix from the main part of the verb. In your examples, the complete verb is "einführen" resp. "eindringen". In both cases, you can separate the prefix "ein-" from the rest of the verb; and the difficult thing is that the ...


21

I think it makes more sense to look at it the other way round: The Verb actually is "aufstehen". The separation of the prefix in certain contexts happens because it's a "trennbares Verb" (separable verb). When used in a main clause, the prefix moves to the end of the clause. In a dependent clause it doesn't. Since what you have in your example is a ...


20

It's "die Nacht" in the standard nominative case, but Rammstein's line is using it in the dative case, which is "der" for feminine nouns. Remember that there are 4 cases for nouns, and that the article and adjective declinations change depending on what case you are using. See here for all the different cases for Nacht.


20

Wie means how, and was means what. But the confusion arises from the fact that the same idea is rendered differently in English than in German. In English, we say, "What is your name?". The literal German translation is "Was ist dein Name?". But in German, we say, "Wie heißen Sie?" or "Wie heißt du?" (respectively, formal and informal). And the literal ...


19

I'm sure this is a misunderstanding. Two points: The "-e"-ending appears to be a relict from times when German still formed the Dative with a suffix. It's retained in phrases like "im Jahre xxxx", in quotations like "dem Manne kann geholfen werden". Perfectly correct, if not extremely common. Secondly: Where does it say feminine on the LEO page? Edit: ...


19

A Google search gave me some information which motivated me to hear the song again and I perceived an interesting fact which I’ve never recognized before. I should listen more carefully to songs in future. There is a wordplay (if it's a good one or not, you have to decide on your own). The second to last repetition says: Willst du bis zum Tod der Scheide ...


18

Don't compare German to English. In German we're not talking about direct and indirect objects. What we concern about are cases: nominative accusative dative genitive The question "Wie geht es dir?" is an example of dative. And the dative form of du is dir. In many cases you can consider the German dative case being an indirect object and the German ...


17

Das Verb halten ist in dem Satz nicht als statische Tätigkeit zu verstehen, wie zum Beispiel in folgender Aussage: Ich halte die Flasche in der linken Hand. Im Satz der Frage oben ist halten hingegen als Tätigkeit gemeint – im Sinne von etwas irgendwohin bewegen. Deshalb ist es richtig, den Akkusativ für das Objekt zu verwenden. Folgende Paraphrase ...


17

Der ähnlichste Plural ist wohl (einer/eine/eines hat keinen Plural): Wir sind einige der Ersten, die dieses Buch gelesen haben. Weniger holprig finde ich allerdings: Wir sind unter den Ersten, die dieses Buch gelesen haben. Eine weitere Alternative ist (Dank an Barth Zalewski): Wir gehören zu den Ersten, die dieses Buch gelesen haben. In einigen ...


16

Easy rule of thumb To make the distinction between "denn" and "dann" a bit clearer we should learn the most common translations for both: denn: than, for, because dann: then, afterwards Of course - as always - there is an overlap in usage and sometimes a distinction is not clear. See also the various usages of "denn" as a intensifying particle in the ...


16

Yes, they are both grammatically allowed in the right context, and there is a difference between them regarding the use of the neuter "[das] Wochenende". "Schönes Wochenende" is singular Nominative or Accusative, like "[ein] schönes Wochenende". "Schönen Wochenende" is singular Dative or Genitive, and you'd probably attach a definite article or ...


16

Zunächst einmal, korrekt ist: Sehr geehrte Dame, sehr geehrter Herr, ... Danach folgt (beginnend mit einem Kleinbuchstaben) der Text. Da eine Bewerbung meist an eine bestimmte Person geht, ist für mich die Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren Klausel etwas zu unpersönlich. Deshalb möchte ich die unbekannte Person direkt ansprechen. Das tust Du in deinem ...


16

Ohne eine Bezeichnung für das Phänomen zu haben, handelt es sich um eine Konstruktion analog zu Schick' mir eine SMS. Wie WhatsApp bezeichnet auch SMS/MMS korrekterweise einen Dienst / eine Anwendung, nicht die Nachricht selbst, die allerdings umgangssprachlich ebenso bezeichnet wird1. WhatsApp ersetzt bzw. ergänzt die ältere SMS funktional wie ...


16

Man kann ein Fest durchaus begehen. Der Ausdruck ist aber sehr "vornehm" und wird immer seltener verwendet. Für so etwas "normales" wie Weihnachten, das jedes Jahr stattfindet, würde ich ihn eher nicht verwenden - Von einem 50-Jährigen Betriebsjubiläum oder einen 100ten Geburtstag kann man aber durchaus hin und wieder in der Zeitung lesen, dass sie feierlich ...


15

According to Wikipedia this is called "Dativ-e": Der Dativ Singular wurde früher bei Hauptwörtern, die im Genitiv Singular auf -es enden können, also bei stark gebeugten männlichen und sächlichen Hauptwörtern, mit der Endung -e gekennzeichnet. Diese Form ist heute veraltet und wird in der Gegenwartssprache üblicherweise nicht mehr gesetzt. ...


15

Richtig ist: Du hättest nicht zur Arbeit gehen sollen. "Hättest" zeigt hier bereits die Vergangenheit an.


15

Assuming that the spelling was unchanged upon immigration to the US, the pronunciation would be Fah-nel (IPA: [ˈfaːnəl]), with the ah pronounced like the sound your doctor asks you to make at a check up. That said, Fahnel isn’t an extremely common German name, and it’s very possible that your ancestors left Germany as Fähnels, and then had their name “...


15

Einfache Regel: Für die Gleichheit benutzt man so + Adjektiv im Positiv + wie, für die Verschiedenheit Adjektiv im Komparativ + als. Negation wird ignoriert. Positiv ist die Grundform eines Adjektivs: groß, klein, müde, leise, … Komparativ oder Vergleichsform ist die erste Steigerung, gebildet mit -er am Ende: größer, kleiner, müder, leiser, … Für ...


15

"Wie lange fahren Sie ans Meer?" could be interpreted as "how long is the drive to the sea?" as well as "how long will you stay at the sea?". Which one of the two depends on the context. "Für wie lange fahren Sie ans Meer?" on the other hand is a perfectly correct and legitimate question, which leaves no doubt about what is being asked (i.e. that you want ...


14

Your confusion is effected through the plural form: der Sinn, die Sinne. In diesem Sinne is only one Sinn, not many Sinne. The dative of der Sinn is built up with dem and not der as in feminine nouns. So it is correct to say In diesem Sinne. (Regarding the -e take notice of Mac's answer)


14

"Es wird morgen ein neues Buch präsentiert." is correct. It sounds a little better when you change the word order and omit the es: "Morgen wird ein neues Buch präsentiert." Your second example: "Darüber hinaus wäre es für mich interessant, ... "Darüber hinaus wäre für mich interessant, ... zu ..." Both sentences are correct in my opinion.


14

Akkusativ is used, because there is no preposition. Wann bist Du mit dem Buch fertig? Ich schreibe es diese Woche fertig. (Akkusativ without preposition) Ich schreibe es in dieser Woche fertig. (Dativ with preposition) Using a preposition or not, defines if Akkusativ or Dativ is correct. Be aware that also Genitiv can be used in some cases. Wann ...


14

This isn't Konjunktiv I. Konjunktiv 1 is used for indirect speech (and other stuff) as in: Direct: Ich gehe heute zur Schule. Indirect: Er sagte, er gehe heute zur Schule. "beglücket" and "schicket" are just old forms of "beglückt" and "schickt". I would use these new forms instead of the old ones.


14

I will classify these mistakes into smaller and big ones and will the explain for each, how bad i think it is (i'm a native german speaker, just fyi). Close to no mistake at all: wrong position of the verb: In german, you can re-order sentences any way you like if you don't destroy the order of words that go together like in "er ist nach hause gegangen" (...


14

Betrachten wir einmal die Fälle in den beiden Sätzen: Das (=Nominativ) sind Fußballfans (=Nominativ). Es (=Nominativ) gibt Fußballfans (=Akkusativ). Sein mit Nominativ-Objekt: Das Verb sein setzt hier zwei Dinge gleich; beide stehen im Nominativ, weshalb man vom sogenannten Gleichsetzungsnominativ spricht. Dieser Link stammt von canoo.net, wo zu lesen ...


14

It seems you mixed up several concepts. There is a feminine word die Lese (meaning the process of collecting, usually grapes for making wine). Its genitive plural is indeed der Lesen. There is a neutral word das Lesen (meaning the act of reading, sometimes also the act of collecting), the nominalized infinitive of lesen. It does not have a plural. Des ...


14

Wichtig für die Deklination von Adjektiven ist der Fall des Substantivs, ob das Substantiv singular oder plural ist, das Genus des Artikels und ob es einen bestimmten Artikel oder unbestimmten Artikel hat: Es stehen noch viele andere Fragen offen. „(Wer oder) Was steht offen?“ Fall: Nominativ „viele Fragen“ = Plural + unbestimmter Artikel, der im ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible