New answers tagged

0

It is almost correct. The verb „zusammenbringen“ is written together. Hence, your sentence should end on „zusammengebracht“.


0

Platz is used as an uncountable word here, like space. The fixed expression Platz wegnehmen (a Funktionsverbgefüge, as @amadeusamadeus pointed out) means to use up space. So there's no article needed, and the word weg is part of the separated verb. The order of parts in the sentence is a bit unusual, especially the position of the word Platz is bordering to ...


0

Word order No poetic license, but the Satzklammer is involved. First of all, the verb is wegnehmen ('to take away'), not simply nehmen ('to take'). Wegnehmen is a separable verb. In a subordinate clause, it is an unit and comes last: …, weil (der) Müll Platz wegnimmt. In a main clause with V2 word order, however, its prefix is separated from the root. The ...


2

Spazieren sein aus Satz (1) ist der Infinitiv des sog. Absentivs, vgl. diese Frage. Dieser kann in Form des Hilfsverbes sein beliebig konjugiert werden: Du bist spazieren. (Präsens) Du warst spazieren. (Präteritum) Du bist spazieren gewesen. (Präsensperfekt) Du warst spazieren gewesen. (Präteritumsperfekt) Du wirst spazieren sein. (Futur I) Du wirst ...


8

Das Pronomen "es" bezieht sich in dem Fall nicht auf die Tablette, sondern auf den ganzen Vorgang, also auf das Nehmen einer Tablette jeden Tag. Deshalb benutzt man da "es". Es ist ja nicht eine einzelne Tablette, die nichts genutzt hat. "Das" geht auch, würde ich hier sogar besser finden. Ich kenne aber den Kontext auch nicht ...


2

"Es" in this sentence refers to the event of taking one pill each day. Therefore it's also valid to use "das" instead of "es", at least in this case. You could still say "Aber sie hat nichts genützt", if you like to refer to the pill, that would still be a correct sentence (but slightly different meaning). However, in ...


3

In German, there are bestimmte Artikel (definite articles) and unbestimmte Artikel (indefinite articles). For example Er zieht den Schuh an. refers to a specific shoe and therefore uses the definite article "der" (in the accusative form "den"). Er zieht einen Schuh an. refers to about any shoe, not a specific one, and therefore uses ...


Top 50 recent answers are included