39

This is a German Kurrent handwriting. When transcribing all letters to a Kurrent font we read: which says: die besten Grüße vom Reichsparteitag 1936 sendet Franz. best regards from the Nuremberg Rally 1936 sends Franz


30

Ü/ü should not be written as Ū/ū in handwritten documents. The 'ū' used to be the distinction between 'n' and 'u' in handwriting because they look very similar. It was a part of the 'Sütterlinschrift' as you can see here.


19

And additional to Takkat's answer the postal address reads: Frau Karl M [...] rmann in Kalkar Kr. Kleve Niederrhein "Kr." is the abbreviation for "Kreis" which is the administrative district. The surname is hard to read because of the postmark. "Karl" is of course a male first name, but 1936 it was quite usual to use the first name of the ...


19

It is German and the second line is written in Kurrent. The first line is written in "normal" script, which implies a name, personal or local. The first line reads Pfann Hptm [Pfann Cptn.] Hptm is the abbreviation of Hauptmann which is Captain. The second line is Kriegsjahr 1914 - 16 [Year of war 1914 - 16] EDIT: As asked in the comments: ...


19

Obviously someone was faster than me but as I have transcribe it too and as I came to a similar result I will post my answer too. Bochum, den 8. September 1925 Gemäß einer von dem Kreisgericht zu Swiecie (Schwetz) in Polen am 5. Februar 1923 aufgenommen Verhandlung hat der Landwirt Konstantijn Vitka, polnischer Staatsangehöriger, wohnhaft in Lniano, ...


18

Some people do this, but that doesn't mean it's correct. It is just sloppy writing and (maybe) a remnant from "Sütterlin" that distinguished the "n" from the "u" that way, and thus has no relationship to umlauts. Old handwriting (other than "Sütterlin") also allowed to write double consonants "nn" and "mm" as a single one with an added vertical bar on top (...


17

We are probably talking about then handwriting as it is taught to children in school. Before 1970 When I was at school we were taught the "Lateinische Ausgangsschrift" where we had to make strokes on the letters as shown below: Source: Wikipedia This was mainly done from historic reasons. The school handwritings derived from Sütterlin, and the &...


16

My trial for the transliteration: In []-brackets I give characters I cannot determine with certainty or that are not present in the original text but are required for the sake of grammar and punctuation. My best guesses are written without the ?-sign, forms and words where I am very unsure are denoted with a ?-sign. Das ist unser Haus[.] das [?Ober...t/...


16

This appears to be Ohmstraße 6. At least one Ohmstraße (named after Georg Simon Ohm) already existed back then and it's one of the very few Berlin street names with such a short name. It seems to be written in Kurrent style as you assumed. Note the somewhat unusual h in Kurrent that nicely matches the second letter in your image:


15

This is how I would normally write them (I’m German): I'm not really consistent with the U, as you can see. Of course everyone has their own handwriting style, some use cursive, some don’t, but almost no one writes it the way you learn in school. People are flexible. I mainly uploaded this to contradict jmiserez’ claim that the 4 has to be closed. I didn’t ...


15

This is a temporary answer to give the community an opportunity to decipher the handwriting. Please feel free to edit this post whenever you feel you found out a missing word. Of course this should be followed by another answer giving the translation, and a guess on the temporal origin if possible. Vom Meiſter Huſſen dem Ketzer dz(?) der zu ͦ Coſtentz ...


15

Es gibt in Deutschland drei Arten von "Schreibschrift": die Schulausgangsschrift (SAS), die in den östlichen Bundesländern mehr verbreitet ist die lateinische Ausgangsschrift (LA), die älteste Schulschreibschrift die vereinfachte Ausgangsschrift (VA), die gebräuchlichste Schulschreibschrift, die auch zur Zeit in der Schule gelehrt wird Auf folgendender ...


14

I'd say it can be written this way. Not that it is taught to be written so, or even encouraged, but everyone who reads it will understand what is meant. I do not believe this is a remnant from the Kurrent or Sütterlin, because there a bowed line denoted something completely different, as has already been pointed out.Two short vertical lines or even a wavy ...


13

Interessanterweise werden hier zwei Handschriften vermischt: Namen, Fachbegriffe, fremdsprachige Teile sind wie im Fraktursatz mit einer international besser verständlichen Schrift geschrieben. 48. Chlorsilber, zum Theil rein und derb, zu Theil mit Quarz gemengt; als dicke Platte zwischen Quarz liegend. Chili. (von Juan Stuven aus Valparai- ...


12

The handwriting is Kurrent and I can recognise the letters as follows: The first letter is clearly an E. The second letter is clearly a b. The third letter is most likely an e. It could also be an n, but those are usually wider. My best guess on number four is an exotic r, but it could also be an n or even e gone wrong. Number five is most likely an s. This ...


12

Es handelt sich um eine bereits im 18. Jahrhundert gebräuchliche Kurrentschrift. Im verlinkten Wikipedia-Artikel findet sich auch eine Alphabettafel, mit deren Hilfe man einzelne Buchstaben zuordnen kann. Von den ersten beiden Zeilen kann ich folgendes entziffern: So schön sang in der ... (Schäfer?) Welt der redliche ... (Liron?), als Luna durch die ...


11

No way should you learn Sütterlin - nobody uses this anymore. I guess you don't even have to learn a "new handwriting" at all. If you try to handwrite "Arial", you'll be fine :-) (Which is requested on most official forms anyway, when they say to fill out in "Druckschrift" or "Druckbuchstaben - could also be "Blockbuchstaben" or "Blockschrift", then they ...


11

I'd assume from context that it's supposed to be Dauffe ... which I'd read as Taufe (baptism). Mitgeteilt probably means given / imparted / assigned, which would be zugeteilt in modern German. The standard meaning of mitteilen is to inform somebody about something.


11

That pretty definitely says Hausmutter. The capital letter is a German "H" as in the attached picture off Wikipedia. The "hooks" on top of the "u" are there to make the "u" and "n" easier to distinguish from each other. I would assume the other word says "Hausvater", then - "Pater" would be a Latin loan word that was used in religious context (monasteries ...


10

The text reads like a birth notice and as such it is only natural for the word you are looking for to read something like Taufe — it is spelt Dauffe here. 1814 predates all normalised orthographies of German, so the spelling in this text is essentially random as long as the letters give the sounds they should. This explains why some words look so different ...


10

This is a handwriting, that has this names (english translations in brackets): Kurrentschrift (kurrent writing) Deutsche Kurrentschrift (German kurrent writing) Alte Deutsche Schrift (old German writing) In English you also find the name German cursive. The word Kurrent comes from latin currere (to run). The German words for Handwriting are Handschrift (...


10

Germany is a big country (80mil people) Depending on when and where you learned writing it tends to be different. But yes I did learn cursive writing. And this was what it was supposed to look like: GDR Handwriting Just look at this article for some pictures on how "official" Handwriting is/was supposed to look in Germany. In the picture below you see where ...


10

I suggest that the premise of this question is somewhat incorrect. The umlaut dots cannot be written as a single line, but a single line is well what might end up on paper when writing quickly. The faster you write, the higher becomes the chance you might just not sufficiently lift up the pen from the paper while moving between two points that are supposed ...


10

These numbers - especially the 7 - are handwritten numbers in the "deutsche Kurrentschrift" or "Kurrent". As you can see on this website, in this handwriting script the 7 has a curved top and the horizontal line in the mid: According to Wikipedia this font was used up to the mid of the 20th century in the whole german-speaking area. So, this 7 is ...


9

as far as i can read it: Aus der Auktion im Jahr 1813 von der Expedition der Lit. Zeitung gehalten if it's verb it's strange because it should end with n or t and I see none of it.


9

It translates to: "Please clean up, grandmother". Bitte = Please, aufräumen = clean up, Oma = Grandmother (more like grandma actually.)


9

I am particularly non-confident with the Polish names, everything German can more easily be inferred from context. It should also be noted that the writing is in some places a mixture of Sütterlin with modern handwriting (varying shapes of "z" and "e"). Bochum, den 8. September 1925 Gemäß einer von dem Kreisgericht zu Świecie (Schwetz) in Polen am 5. ...


9

My attempt to decipher the writing and the official seal looks something like this: "No 123 des Inv. Verz." Nr. 123 des (Inv)entar(verz)eichnisses (inventory list) "Sauer 7.65" Sauer 7.65 "P.H.W. Reuter zum"" (P)olizei(h)aupt(w)achtmeister (Police Chief Constable) Reuter (Kuiter???) zum" "Dienstgebrauch" Dienstgebrauch (official use) But the ...


8

As you already mentioned, there is a wide variation of styles in use. I wouldn't worry too much, most people are used to be rather flexible at reading them, as there are quite significant individual differences. For filling forms, you are usually requested to use Blockschrift (upper case letters only) or Druckschrift (upper and lower case letters, but ...


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