Skip to main content
40 votes
Accepted

What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?

Most people just say Entschuldigung which just means "excuse me" or "sorry". Sometimes you hear just the colloquial shortened version Tschuldign which sometimes gets condensed to even more ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
18 votes

German proper name or funny paraphrase for a slightly stupid dragon (Zmey Gorynych)

The dragon of classic German literature is "der Lindwurm" who is killed by Siegfried in the Nibelungenlied. Actually Lindwurm is an old word for dragon, but I only know it in reference to ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.2k
18 votes

Usage of the word "Dialekt"

"Dialekt sprechen" is correct, as well as "einen Dialekt sprechen". "Mit einem Dialekt sprechen" doesn't sound quite right to me, as if you are confusing "Dialekt&...
Stefan's user avatar
  • 311
16 votes
Accepted

What is the German equivalent of the proverb 水清ければ魚棲まず (if the water is clear, fish won't live there)?

There are at least two common sayings expressing the idea of not being too strict in following the rules: [wir wollen] nicht päpstlicher als der Papst sein source (we don't want to be more pope ...
Pollitzer's user avatar
  • 16k
15 votes

Difference between two possibilities for a warning label

The typical German instruction manual idiom would be: Nur bei Stillstand des Fahrzeugs zurücksetzen. Your first variant wenn angehalten would imply to a German reader that the tripmeter itself had ...
Tilman Schmidt's user avatar
14 votes

Wie kann man dem Kellner sagen, wieviel Trinkgeld man ihm gibt?

Wenn ich bei einer 19€-Rechnung 20 € geben möchte (also 1 € Trinkgeld), aber nur einen 50er habe, dann sage ich "20, bitte", d. h. Nr. 12.
zoagli's user avatar
  • 426
14 votes

What is the best way to say "a large number of [noun]" in German?

None of your given translations has a counterpart for large. The simplest variant would of course be viele [noun], e. g. viele Zelte. Note, that eine Reihe von corresponds to a few or a couple of, so ...
guidot's user avatar
  • 28.6k
13 votes
Accepted

Expression for "little people"

Personally, I’ve never encountered little people being used that way in English, but I’m not a native speaker and since there are some similar phrases in German I’ve no doubt it can refer to unknown ...
Crissov's user avatar
  • 9,177
13 votes

What if someone says "Ich bin" as a self-introduction?

The difference is in the level of formality vs casualness here. Ich heiße Fritz Müller would be a formal, almost stiff way of introducing yourself. Someone presenting himself to a conference ...
Christian Geiselmann's user avatar
12 votes

What is the German equivalent of 干物女 (dried fish woman)?

In short: There is none At least none which barely covers more than two or three of all these aspects. But, as japanese wiki says it's a term originated from the manga Hotaru no Hinari by Hiura ...
mtwde's user avatar
  • 14.2k
12 votes
Accepted

Best way to say 'to move up' as in 'reschedule for an earlier point in time'

A good choice would probably be vorverlegen. "Verlegen" refers, among other meanings, to changing the position of something - in space and/or in time. Therefore, Die Besprechung nächste ...
Henning Kockerbeck's user avatar
11 votes

What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?

An often used (colloquial) phrase in such situations is Entschuldigung! Darf ich bitte einmal durch? (Beg your pardon! May I pass, please?) With the "bitte" and the "Entschuldigung" it is a polite ...
IQV's user avatar
  • 11.5k
10 votes

no days off : translation?

Kein freier Tag! The simple imperative; German is well suited as a command language ;-) Of course it can be embellished, or in another context becomes a complaint...
Bobby J's user avatar
  • 680
10 votes
Accepted

German idioms like "Draining the swamp"

The German idiom is die Sümpfe trockenlegen; das Trockenlegen der Sümpfe to drain the swamps; the draining of the swamps This is one of the rare cases where an idiomatic phrases uses the exactly ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Difference between two possibilities for a warning label

You can say Nur bei Fahrzeugstillstand zurücksetzen. Personally I would prefer Nicht während der Fahrt zurücksetzen. This is not a literal translation, but it says that the tripmeter must not be ...
Paul Frost's user avatar
  • 10.7k
9 votes
Accepted

Werden Regeln gebogen oder gebeugt?

Wie @tofro schon kommentiert hat, bedeutet biegen eine dauerhafte Veränderung (physikalisch wird der Fließpunkt des Materials überschritten, so dass es nicht mehr zurückfedert), während beugen etwas ...
ths's user avatar
  • 320
9 votes
Accepted

What is the German equivalent of 干物女 (dried fish woman)?

This is a very pejorative use of imagery already at the Japanese source, it seems. As such it is quite specific to Japanese culture as well. A direct translation or one-word translation or even a very ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
  • 7,300
9 votes

no days off : translation?

Yes, there is "[…] a German equivalent that does justice to the brevity of the English […]" phrase: to have no day off  ⇒  keinen Tag frei haben
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
9 votes

What is the best way to say "a large number of [noun]" in German?

I think the most natural translation for A large number of tents are set up. is Zahlreiche Zelte werden aufgebaut.
Pollitzer's user avatar
  • 16k
8 votes

Should it be ‘so bunt wie’ or ‘so bunt als’?

Seine Hose ist nicht so bunt wie die Jacke. (no comparative) Seine Hose ist weniger bunt als die Jacke. (comparative) Seine Hose ist weniger bunt wie die Jacke. (comparative, dialect) Seine Hose ist ...
Janka's user avatar
  • 61.2k
8 votes
Accepted

Expression for blindly following rules

German doesn't really have strong terms for persons behaving like you describe, but rather for the behaviour as such. Dienst nach Vorschrift is one (following rules by the book in the sense of never ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 65k
8 votes

What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?

There's no reason why you shouldn't be polite and say "Verzeihung!" or "Entschuldigung" - just as you would say "Excuse me" in English. People should know you want them to give way without you ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 65k
8 votes

What is the German equivalent of the proverb 水清ければ魚棲まず (if the water is clear, fish won't live there)?

If Nietzsche already came up as inspiration, that well holds even more water: Und hüte dich vor dem Guten und dem Gerechten! Sie lieben es, diejenigen zu kreuzigen, die ihre eigene Tugend für sich ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
  • 7,300
8 votes

Could I use "Ich mag mit meinen Mitschülern sein" instead of "Ich bin gerne mit meinen Klassenkameraden zusammen"?

The sentence Ich mag mit meinen Mitschülern sein is definitely unusual, maybe even considered wrong, but at least antiquated. There are several ways to express this in a more idiomatic way Ich mag ...
infinitezero's user avatar
  • 18.4k
8 votes

no days off : translation?

My suggestion is Keine Auszeit.
Paul Frost's user avatar
  • 10.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Wie kann man dem Kellner sagen, wieviel Trinkgeld man ihm gibt?

Es ist ziemlich einfach. Gibt man den passenden Betrag, sagt man schlicht "Stimmt so." oder "Passt so.". Gibt man mehr als man geben möchte, nennt man schlicht den akkuraten Betrag, also ...
Em1's user avatar
  • 38.6k
7 votes

Yiddish phrase for "turn out the lights and go to sleep"

A better Yiddish speaker than I recently apprised me of the fact that there is indeed such an expression in Yiddish as "machn nacht," meaning, roughly, "get ready for bed." "Mach nacht" is the ...
SAH's user avatar
  • 295
7 votes

What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?

One expression not mentioned so far is Bahn frei! which you will use primarily when riding a bicycle or sledge and want to get your way free of people standing there. However, you can also use it ...
Christian Geiselmann's user avatar
7 votes

German proper name or funny paraphrase for a slightly stupid dragon (Zmey Gorynych)

There are a number of famous dragons in German-language literature / mythology, but these usually have 1 or 2 heads. In Japanese monster films, however, there is a three-headed dragon named King ...
mtwde's user avatar
  • 14.2k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible