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15 votes

How do I translate "Let's …"?

In German "let's" or "let us" translates to a type of imperative (first person plural imperative): Lasst uns In some context also: lasset uns Let's visit uncle Tom. Let's pray. ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
14 votes
Accepted

How to command "Head north" in German naval/military slang?

Formally, course is not commanded using compass directions (north, south, east, west) in mil-speak, too long and too easy to mis-interpret. You rather give the course in degrees, 0° heading north, ...
tofro's user avatar
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11 votes
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„Herein gekrabbelt!“ as a friendly request / instruction

"Hereingekrabbelt" is a variation on "Hereinspaziert", which is an informal way of saying, "Come in". (More formal alternatives include "Kommen Sie herein" and "Bitte treten Sie ein".) The ...
Tsundoku's user avatar
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11 votes
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Why would you use the past participle in commands rather than the imperative?

German has the classic imperative like Pass auf! Bleib stehen! and a number of other forms that can be used as replacement forms to express the imperative: Infinitive Strict order, sounds very ...
tofro's user avatar
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10 votes
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Where should I use "bitte" in imperative sentences?

(1) Bitte mach das Fenster zu! / Bitte füll das Formular aus! (2) Mach bitte das Fenster zu! / Füll bitte das Formular aus! (3) Mach das Fenster bitte zu! / Füll das Formular bitte aus! All are ...
Pollitzer's user avatar
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10 votes
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Wie schreibt man trennbare Verben in Imperativsätzen?

The former prefix of separable verbs must always stand at the end of the clause. Examples with the verb: abwaschen Indikativ, Futur I (not separated): Sebastian wird das Geschirr, das während der ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
8 votes

"Lernt zu zuhören" oder "Lernt zuzuhören"?

This is correct: Lernt zuzuhören. This is wrong: Lernt zu zuhören. The verb zuhören is a separable verb (correct: »Ich höre dir zu.« Wrong: »Ich zuhöre dir.«). And this means, that "zu" can ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
8 votes

How do I translate "Let's …"?

... but seeing as German does not have this feature First of all that's a huge misconception. German language of course has an imperatve verb form, e.g.: Setz Dich! Lasst das! Fahren wir! Let's is ...
πάντα ῥεῖ's user avatar
7 votes
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Informal plural imperative in guides/instructions

It does not seem unusual to me that a video game walkthrough on the internet is written in informal second person plural imperative. Going for singular would be fine, too. The difference is whether ...
Arno's user avatar
  • 709
7 votes

Imperative for "vergessen:" does it need an object?

Yes. You're right. the "es" is redundant because the Nebensatz acts as an object
Olafant's user avatar
  • 8,920
6 votes

In "klinget Glöckchen klinget", is "klinget" the imperative form?

Yes, the imperative of "klingen" in singular is "kling" or "klinge", but in plural it is "klingt" or "klinget" (where "klinget" is archaic ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.3k
6 votes

Imperative for "vergessen:" does it need an object?

You don't need the "es" (which can stand in when something is ommitted), because there is nothing ommitted: deinen Reisepass zu holen is already this object and you don't need to mark ...
bakunin's user avatar
  • 9,278
5 votes
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Where does "Attacke!" come from?

The word "die Attacke" is a German noun - indeed, it entered German as a loanword (from French), but it is by no means a recent addition. Using a noun rather than an imperative is not ...
O. R. Mapper's user avatar
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5 votes
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Bleibe Ruhig - Der Erlkönig

The imperative of the verb bleiben for the second person singular is bleib or bleibe. Thus, the expression "Bleibe ruhig!" is correct.
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
5 votes

How to turn "er möge" in indirect speech to direct

"er möge doch gehen und mich in Ruhe lassen" is an intriguing choice of words for an indirect speech (I suppose it is in french, too) because möge indicates a polite expression, but there's no bitte ...
Kristina's user avatar
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5 votes
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The location of `nicht` when saying 'don't spit on the floor!' in German

First of all, Sie or du doesn't make a difference here. Now, (1) and (3) are definitely correct and idiomatic. (2) and (4) are in all practical scenarios incorrect, but had their usages in poetic ...
phipsgabler's user avatar
  • 5,317
5 votes
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Imperativ oder Infinitiv im User-Interface

Zunächst: Ich kenne keine normative deutschsprachige Anweisung, ob Infinitiv oder Imperativ (oder etwas anderes) zu bevorzugen wäre. "Sprachunabhängige" (sic) Ui-Guidelines verschiedener ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 65k
5 votes
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Erwirb Vaseline und Quark(,) bitte

Meiner Auffassung nach handelt es sich bei diesem bitte um einen Nachtrag. Dem Auffordernden ist aufgefallen, dass der blanke Imperativ unhöflich wirkt, und mildert den Satz durch ein nachgeschobenes ...
guidot's user avatar
  • 28.8k
4 votes
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How to turn "er möge" in indirect speech to direct

You are pretty much spot on, in my opinion. The indirect speech construction used here is a very indirect one where there is no 1:1 mapping of the verbs involved. This is because we are dealing with ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
4 votes

Why would you use the past participle in commands rather than the imperative?

If you use the past participle in a command, you're saying that you want it done "yesterday." That is the sense of commands like "Hiergeblieben!" and "Aufgepasst!" Of course, something can't be done ...
Tom Au's user avatar
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4 votes
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In "klinget Glöckchen klinget", is "klinget" the imperative form?

There are two very similar German verbs that have different meanings and should not be confused: klingeln = to ring He rings at the door. = Er klingelt an der Tür. The phone rings. = Das Telefon ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"Nach dem Befinden fragen"-meaning of "Nach dem"

"Nach dem Befinden fragen" isn't a sentence, it's just a verb with it's prepositional object, which might be part of the confusion. A grammatically more correct translation would be "to ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.3k
3 votes
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Formal Imperative of “sein” — “Sein” or “Seien”?

This does indeed look like an exception. I am not aware of any other verbs where the imperative polite form does not match the infinitive (but I may just not have thought of it). In any case, the ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
3 votes
Accepted

Imperative: Verb at the start versus at the end

Your general recognition that ... they had always tell you to form the imperative with the verb at the beginning is correct. Though the examples you heard 'Jetzt sparen' and '...
πάντα ῥεῖ's user avatar
3 votes

Meaning of: "Bitte, erinnere mich an … "

You sure mean e.g. Bitte erinnere mich an den Brief! This means you should remind me about the letter. It's not reflexive. Bitte erinnere dich an den Brief! This means you should remind ...
Janka's user avatar
  • 62k
3 votes

Informal plural imperative in guides/instructions

It is somewhat odd, but some Google searching (triggered by David Vogt's comments) shows that it is used a lot nowadays. Most game guides I knew in the past used the informal second person ("...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.3k
3 votes

Imperativ oder Infinitiv im User-Interface

Es gibt hinreichend viele Beispiele für den Infinitiv aus vergleichsweise grauer Vorzeit: hier öffnen auf Konserven und ähnlichen Gefäßen drücken und ziehen auf Türen Während der Fahrt nicht mit dem ...
guidot's user avatar
  • 28.8k
3 votes
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Imperative mood tenses?

Grammarians call the imperative a mood, but I'm not sure that's really a helpful way to classify it. As mentioned in the comments, it does not have a tense. You can classify sentences according to ...
RDBury's user avatar
  • 11.7k
3 votes

'sieh' vs 'siehe' in imperative

Strong verbs that change e of the stem to i in the 2nd and 3d person singular present indicative form the imperative with i in the stem and no ending (https://grammis.ids-mannheim.de/systematische-...
David Vogt's user avatar
  • 26.5k
2 votes

Imperativ von „überführen“ als „in einen anderen Zustand bringen”

DWDS beschreibt das genauso, siehe I, Ziffer 2. Eine Google-Suche bestätigt andererseits Deine Erinnerung, eines von vielen Beispielen (leider überwiegend in PDF-Dateien ausgelagert): Überführen Sie ...

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