33

Others have already given good answers, but I thought I'd elaborate a bit more on the difference of "Du" vs "Sie". The thing is - "Sie" is used when trying to show respect. There is no direct equivalent in the English language, although if I understand correctly, the old-fashioned "thou" used to fill this role1. ...


27

I would translate it as (Nur) Ums mal zu erwähnen. / Ums mal erwähnt zu haben. or Wills nur mal gesagt haben. or Falls ihrs noch nicht wusstet. / Nur damit ihrs wisst. But to be honest I wouldn't add another sentence, I would add another word at the beginning at the sentence to achieve your intention Übrigens (By the way) which leads to ...


25

In a fantasy setting it is quite uncommon to use Sie. You would use du or the pluralis majestatis form Ihr So the question would rather be, why is Gandalf saying Du kannst nicht vorbei! instead of Ihr könnt nicht vorbei! You are right that animals would be addressed as du in German and, furthermore, that the Balrog cannot be considered an animal. At ...


24

First thoughts would be: Wer ist dabei? Wer macht mit? Wer geht / kommt mit? (depending on context)


21

Kann man fast wörtlich übersetzen: Ich sag's nur. Wie πάντα ῥεῖ anmerkt in vielen Variationen denkbar: Ich sag's ja nur. Ich sag's nur mal. Ich erwähn's nur. Wollt ich (ja) nur mal gesagt (erwähnt, angemerkt, ...) haben. Nur für's Protokoll. Nur so zur Info(rmation). Ich mein ja nur. Nur mal so (gesagt). Nebenbei/Nur so am Rande gesagt/angemerkt/...


17

In the German translation of Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" one does nowhere find the modern polite form Sie, but the old-fashioned Ihr. Why is that? I think the use of Ihr wants to indicate that all this happened a very long time ago. The phrase Du kannst nicht vorbei! is taken from Margaret Carroux's German translation of Tolkien's books. See ...


15

just saying is a filling phrase which does not have a close correspondent in German In most cases, just saying is a filling phrase and could well be omitted without hurting the meaning. However, just saying is a pretty common filling phrase in English. For translating it, it is important to understand that it is much more common in English than any of its ...


12

A number of languages allow omitting pronouns (even) in formal speech and writing. Spanish is one of them, although the pattern is restricted to subject pronouns. German, like English, is generally "non-pronoun-dropping". However, in informal and colloquial speech, it's not uncommon in either language. Some often-heard examples: Kann sein. (Could be.) ...


11

Vieles wurde ja schon genannt. Ich ergänze um: Ich glaube.... Ich denke, dass... Das ist doch... Ich sage doch schon immer, dass... Ich hatte in der Zeit nach der Wende (ist ja schon ein bißchen her...) die interessante Erfahrung, dass plötzlich neue Formen dazu kamen, die alle den Konjunktiv gebrauchten: Ich würde meinen, dass... Ich würde mal sagen, ...


10

I'd say that if this is the initial letter you're writing, I'd certainly go for the formal version when addressing the parents and for the informal version when addressing the kids. You can refer to the entire family as ihr, which reduces the degree of formality a bit, but not as much as addressing everybody informally. For following letters, I'd decide ...


8

Meines Erachtens [ist diese Frage berechtigt.] (gehobene Ausdrucksweise) Meiner Meinung nach [ist heute Ostermontag.] Meiner Ansicht nach [ist Frank Plasberg das, was sich das Ausland unter einem Deutschen vorstellt.] Meiner Überzeugung nach [sind die Würfel längst gefallen: Russland wird immer größer.] Meiner Auffassung nach [zählt man Nachbarn nicht zu ...


8

Seemingly nonsensical talk is sometimes called Geblubber in German. This most probably derives from the sound bubbles make when emerging from the water - it is a sound that is annoying enough to be heard but meaningless. I'd guess that Blob, like Plopp oder Blubb, is used here to indicate that what the person said was just a waste of air. The word itself - ...


8

It does not seem unusual to me that a video game walkthrough on the internet is written in informal second person plural imperative. Going for singular would be fine, too. The difference is whether the writer thinks of a prototypical reader, or his readership in total. For some people (including myself) using singular can feel overly personal here. Using the ...


7

I usually respond to: "Schönes Wochenende!" with "Gleichfalls!" or "Ihnen/Dir auch!" or, less formal: "Auch so!" Of course, to be polite, you could start the response with a "Danke!".


7

The answer See https://www.dwds.de/wb/ur- which is very helpful, especially when you have a look on the etymology. You are right in stating that ur- is used to refer to the origin of something far back: bezeichnet den Anfang, das erste, etw. sehr weit Zurückliegendes" Examples are Urbevölkerung Urwald Urmensch other examples, but with ...


7

I am certainly old fashioned (probably more of the parents generation), but I have been an exchange student in a similar situation. I was spared the decision as I was going the other way - my hosting country was the US. Talking to the parents, I would go for the formal version. It shows respect and leaves the choice to the ones it belongs. They most ...


7

Ja, die Bedeutung ist "durchreichen", und das Verb ist trennbar. Wir schleifen den Parameter durch. Hingegen empfände ich *Wir durchschleifen den Parameter. so als durchquerte jemand schleifend einen Parameter, was nicht viel Sinn ergibt.


7

tl;dr: The typical textbook statement "Du is for friends and family" is only a half-truth which applies to typical everyday situations. Originally it is simply the direct and unadorned form of address. Its use in this situation is entirely proper, and a polite form would be grossly misplaced. In this specific scene I see a couple of reasons Du is ...


6

Der Begriff Durchschleifen in der hier gesuchten Bedeutung kommt ursprünglich aus der Elektrotechnik und wird dort seit langem gebraucht (bei Google Books habe ich ihn in einem Dokument der AEG von 1937 gefunden). Er bezeichnet eine Verdrahtungsart, bei der die Kabel, die in ein Gerät hineingeführt werden, um es anzuschließen, aus diesem auch wieder ...


6

It is a short version of Du kannst mich mal am Arsch lecken. Literally: You can lick me at my ass. In English you would say: Kiss my ass. Maybe interesting to know: In previous times, German speaking people did not lick at the ass, but in the ass: Leck mich im Arsch. Two famous quotes: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote this lines in the ...


5

Although I fear that your usage of the English word to poke is at least, say, uncommon, I have to place a bit of a guess on what you might think this means in English -the best way for a close to literal translation to German would maybe be jemanden anhauen. Wenn du mal wieder Hilfe brauchst, kannst du mich ja einfach anhauen. Ich hab' den um 'ne Fluppe ...


5

Einer Aussage wie Das ist … wird ugs. oft eine nicht satzfähige Phrase nachgestellt: … – meine Meinung! Häufig ist das ein regional gebräuchlicher Fragepartikel: …, ne? …, nich(t)? …, nicht wahr? …, wa? …, gell(e)? …, woll? …, oder? …, hmm? …, stimmt’s? Es gibt auch einige längere einschlägige Fragefloskeln: … Hab(e) ich nicht Recht? … Das wird man doch ...


5

Blob doesn't mean anything in German. Thus no other meanings, and no etymology. With a lot of imagination, I could imagine it is a onomatopoeic expression featuring a goldfish in the glass, even if the text makes no further reference to it.


5

A recommended read on the topic is Vorfeld-Analepse bei Aussagen. It's rather long and difficult, but covers a lot of ground. Custom requires that I mention at least a few pertinent points. It's not about dropping pronouns. It's about the Vorfeld being left empty in declarative sentences. In a pro-drop language such as Italian, the subject pronoun can be ...


4

Das trennt man durch-schlei-fen. Ist wirklich IT-Umgangssprache. Es ist mehr als übergeben, dabei wird ein Parameter nur an eine Funktion gegeben. Durchschleifen ist mehr, kann über mehrere Programmteile weitergegeben werden. z. B. eine Funktion bekommt den Parameter übergeben, ruft eine andere Funktion auf, die dann auch den Parameter übergeben bekommt. ...


4

The only adjectives you want to prefix with ur- in formal conversation are "uralt" and "urplötzlich". Using "ur" to intensify other adjectives as in "urschön" is Viennese youth language. (And really only used in Vienna and Lower Austria.)


4

This is a very broad topic. To start with how you started your actual question ("So I'm a beginner..."): This rather impolite and careless style of speaking is popular in German as well, especially amongst youth. A typical phrase is: Also ich hab da mal ne Frage: ... But this is really bad style. You should not turn to other people using that formula ...


4

I don't really think, we have this figure. I mean, yes "ich mein ja nur" works pretty well as a translation, but it could be perceived as passive aggressive. If we're hungry and I want to suggest a restaurant, I'd rather use something like "Es gäbe auch ein Restaurant in der Nähe". I.e. I'd choose a formulation/proposal with a subjunctive.


4

"Komm' schon" would probably be the more fitting translation for "come on" for encouragement or prodding. "Komm' jetzt" is more like "Come now". An impatient mother might say that to her dawdling child. "Komm' jetzt" on its own is quite harsh, like an order or a command. You might want to think about whether ...


4

Yes; they are both correct and quite similar. Neither is generally preferable, though "wollen" would be slightly more relaxed. "Sollen" would imply that there is need to meet in some way at some time (e.g. to sort things out or to comfort someone who just got hurt) or that there is a general agreement to meet and you are trying to set the specific date (like ...


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