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33

You are right with all your assumptions. The word ever is the English word; so the insult was formed by mixing German and English – which is not too unusual and probably seemed more “cool” to the girl. The word behinderter should have indeed been behindertster, which makes the whole thing even more embarrassing. A native German speaker will have no problem ...


29

It depends on the context. If you call your neighbor, an officer, or someone else in the street a Schwein, it's an insult. If a parent tells their child he or she is a Schwein, it usually means they are eating messily or came home all dirty from playing. This is often softened to "Ferkel" (piglet), which of course will get you an answer along the lines of "...


27

This is a fundamental cultural difference between official American dogma and German everyday word usage. You might take the stance that in German conversation people despise profanities as much as Americans do. If you avoid the same type of words in German you will not cause much consternation. Politeness is really based on largely the same contexts that ...


14

Ungebildet does not mean the same as uneducated. In german, the terms has a (slight) negative connotation. It means that the person has a below-then-average general knowledge. It can also refer to manners. If you have bad manners, sometimes the word ungebildet is used to describe that ("Was für ein ungebildeter Pöbel!"). For example, if you fail to hold ...


11

Das Loch ist sächlich, daher ist auch jedes Kompositum, das mit diesem Wort endet (wie eben das Arschloch), sächlich. Der Eindruck, Arschloch z.B. in dem Satz Dieser Mann ist ein Arschloch. wäre männlich, kommt davon, dass der unbestimmte Artikel ein sowohl männliche, als auch sächliche Wörter bezeichnet: männlich: der Wagen, ein Wagen. sächlich: ...


10

I would break down the phrase to: behinderter (physically or mentally challenged): arbitrarily chosen derogatory adjective Lehrer (discussed topic) ever (English word) sort of emphasis, German equivalent would be aller Zeiten Obviously the phrase lacks in nearly every respect, but mostly a superlative form for the adjective would help.


10

If a smoker smells of cold smoke (and for a non-smoker all smokers do), he is ein laufender Aschenbecher (a walking ashtray)


10

"Er raucht wie ein Kamin" - I haven't encountered that one yet. Er raucht wie ein Schlot with "Schlot" being a high, tall thin chimney of a factory or coal power plant, but not the regular chimney through which Santa Claus enters. Another for someone who smokes lots would be Kettenraucher (=chain smoker)


10

Nach Wortschatz Leipzig ist das Wort nur 6 Häufigkeitsklassen unter Idiot, wird also ca. 64 mal seltener verwendet. Der geäußerten These, eine weniger gebräuchliche Beledigung sei weniger ernst zu nehmen, kann ich mich nicht anschließen. Es kann sowohl harmloser sein („versteht das Wort eh nicht, ist also weniger beleidigt“) als auch heftiger („wenn es schon ...


9

"Die alte Huhn" would only work in some regions of Germany if Huhn is the family name of the woman. It wouldn’t be an offense when used by e.g. villagers: Die alte Huhn hat mir erzählt, dass der alte Schmidt gestorben ist. (Old Mrs Huhn told me, that old Mr Schmidt has died.) "Das alte Huhn" would be the correct translation in your example and is ...


8

In gedruckten Werken findet Google-NGram seit ca. 1940 eine etwa konstante Verwendung des Wortes, 1910, 1850 und um 1800 war das Wort wesentlich stärker verbreitet. Gegenwartssprache ist auch, das kann man leicht übersehen, was über 80jährige sprechen und was nur in gewissen Milieus gesprochen wird - daher sind eigene Erfahrungen notorisch unzuverlässig. ...


7

It should be das alte Huhn for the right grammar and it definitly is insulting. Not in a very bad way but still. If you are saying die alte Huhn you are refering to the woman, with the last name Huhn and then this is of course no insult.


6

The way I see it, this is not really about German: I think it would be the same in every other language. Anyway, here is my take on it. You don't need to worry. Yes, "Schwein" is normally an insult, but it was said in a very specific context. She called you a pig because you were doing something dirty (sex always is), but on the other hand she was there ...


6

Let’s just go backwards analysing this: Ever, being used just like in English, is rather frequent in youth culture nowadays. It has pretty much replaced aller Zeiten and to add ‘coolness’, it is often written evar and/or with repeated final vowel. As far as I know both English-speaking and German-speaking youth culture, ever fulfils the same role in both. ...


6

Nein, gibt es nicht. Jedes Wort kann in einer freundlichen Konversation zum Beispiel zitierend benutzt werden, notfalls mit einer vorweggeschickten Entschuldigung für das Wort, welches aber aus Gründen der Präzision genau so wiedergegeben werden muss, wie es gesagt wurde. Zum zweiten gibt es auch in Deutschland Rassisten, und die sprechen auch ...


6

I disagree with the answer from πάντα ῥεῖ: Living in the south of Germany I never saw "Ruhig Brauner" being used as an insult. We use it on a regular basis here (friends and family) and it is always meant as "calm down" with a wink, often accompanied by a neihging. Sometimes it is used by "authorities" (bouncers at discos) in a means to calm down visitors ...


5

"Ungebildet" means "uneducated", but is not restricted to formal education (indeed, "gebildet" can even be used in opposition to formal education, if you think that formal education goes wrong). When referring to formal education, you'd often say "ausgebildet" instead. The term "gebildet" refers to everything you learned during your life, starting with what ...


5

Literally, ungebildet means uneducated. However it carries a negative connotation that's similar to that of the English commoner. It is sometimes used like uneducated, but usually one avoids it by using different words like höheres/tieferes Bildungsniveau, which also isn't perfectly neutral, but still better than ungebildet. The negative connotation is ...


5

In Swiss German (call it a dialect, we call it the proper German) we tend to say: Öpper hets mal wider nötig which freely translated to standard German would be written: Jemand hat es mal wieder (dringend) nötig OR Jemand hat es (dringend) nötig Variations would also be: Hier hat's jemand (dringend) nötig Der/Die braucht's mal wieder (dringend)


4

Ich hab leider keine Belege dafür, aber ich bin mir sicher, dass der Zusammenhang zwischen dem Götz und Leck mich am Arsch (LmaA) nur einer Minderheit bekannt ist. Ich vermute, dass ihn nicht mal jeder Abiturient kennt. Deshalb wird Da könnte ich nur Götz von Berlichingen zitieren. nur gebraucht, wenn der Redner / Schreiber ein bestimmtes Bildungsniveau ...


4

Since you also (in a comment) asked for short versions, the shortest I've actually heard is the expression: Er/Sie ist wohl untervögelt. or obvious albeit slightly longer variations: Da ist wohl jemand untervögelt.


4

Kretin ist auch heute noch ein durchaus gebräuchlicher Terminus für Idiot, Dummkopf, schwachköpfiger Trottel etc.; entscheidend für die Häufigkeit der Benutzung ist – unabhängig voneinander – sowohl der geographische Standort als auch die soziale Schicht. In gesellschaftlichen Kreisen, die Wert auf Abgrenzung zur sozialen Unterschicht legen, ist der Begriff ...


4

I never heard anybody saying these expressions, but a male smoker I personally call Luftbekacker (air shitter, someone who shits in the air). And a female smoker I call Tabakschlampe (tobacco slut). The female version of Luftbekacker is Luftbekackerin. Accordingly instead of rauchen (to smoke) I say die Luft bekacken (to shit in the air).


3

As another alternative: The Cigarette Smoking Man character from the X Files was sometimes derogatively referred to as Cancer Man1. In the German dubbing, this was (in my opinion, fittingly) translated as Krebskandidat. 1: He was so high up in the ranks of a secret agency that even his name was secret and unknown to the protagonists for much of the series. ...


3

I don't know much German but I'm pretty sure it's just saying that you're naughty. It would be like 'you filthy bastard' in English, normally that's a grave insult but in the particular context you mention and the way it's said it's clearly not an insult, isn't that obvious?


2

Das Wort ist weder hochgestochen noch antiquiert, und die Benutzung des Wortes Kretin ist auch in der Gegenwartssprache noch relevant; natürlich ist es weder denglisch noch neudeutsch. Allerdings ist die Häufigkeit der Verwendung wohl auch regional unterschiedlich. Vielleicht könnte man es für manche mit dem Zusatz "Alter" etwas hipper gestalten. Frage an ...


2

Teerhalde, Suchti, Quarzer, Dampfer, Stummellutscher, Paffer (obviously) are terms I have come across. Kiffer targeting at ("normal") cigarette smokers I have heard as well (Even if kiffen it is an expression for smoking pot, normally).


2

Du hast nicht mehr alle Kerzen auf der Torte is a variation of Du hast nicht mehr alle beisammen Which means that he is losing an essential (mental) capacity (usually sanity or intelligence). Side-notes: It might not be a very common expression (the base one is though) 'Torte' is a fancy version of a cake, which is literally translated to 'Kuchen'. ...


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