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18 votes
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Cultural context for "Abendland" and "Rettung" in this song lyric

While I agree on the core of Philipp's answer, I'd like to elaborate about the song context a little bit more: First about the context: As the page says, it is about Alice (Weidel) and Sarah (Bossard)...
Shegit Brahm's user avatar
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15 votes
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What is the meaning of this song title: "Die Schlampen sind müde" von Rosenstolz?

The nouns »die Schlampe« and »der Schlamper« are nominalizations of the adjective »schlampig« which means »sloppy, slovenly, frowsy, slipshod, blowzy, negligent, ...«. This adjective can be used to ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
15 votes

Why is "bleiben" conjugated as "bleibet" in the Bach choral "Jesus bleibet meine Freude"?

The word bleibet is just an outdated form of bleibt. The cantata was written in 1723, 300 years ago. And as you said, the text is even older, from 1665, so almost 360 years old. German is a living ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
15 votes
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Why is "bleiben" conjugated as "bleibet" in the Bach choral "Jesus bleibet meine Freude"?

Good question, and your observation and speculation as to the origin is imho correct. The usually needed form is "bleibt" and "bleibet" is archaic and meanwhile wrong outside these ...
planetmaker's user avatar
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14 votes
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Lyrics translation: "Dalai Lama" by Rammstein

But I believe that the verb gehört requires the dativ … Ordinarily you would be correct. In this case, however, we are not talking about simply gehören in the sense of belong to, but the collocation ...
Ingmar's user avatar
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13 votes
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In "Han i glei net allweil bei dir sein", what is the word "han"?

The citing of the verse is inaccurate. Actually it reads: Kann ('can') i glei net allweil bei dir sein There is, however, the word han in the next verse: Han ('have') i doch mei Freud’ an dir! Han ...
amadeusamadeus's user avatar
12 votes

Why is "bleiben" conjugated as "bleibet" in the Bach choral "Jesus bleibet meine Freude"?

On the one hand, yes this is simply an archaic form of conjugation. On the other hand, this conjugation is heavily used in musical lyrics for other reasons: first, it's two syllables instead of one ...
tofro's user avatar
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10 votes

Verb in third position not followed by adverb

First, the address ach Gott is not part of the sentence. This can easily be seen from the following examples, where an address has been prepended to the major sentence types of German. Hans, hast ...
David Vogt's user avatar
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10 votes
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"Welt, ade, ich bin dein müde" in Bach BWV 158

It is an archaism. The genitive pronoun form used to be «dein» (similarly, also «mein»). The form «deiner» (and «meiner») had become common by the 18th century, while Luther in the 16th century still ...
mach's user avatar
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10 votes

Cultural context for "Abendland" and "Rettung" in this song lyric

This is just an extended comment to Shegit Brahm's fitting answer. The word "Abendland" is basically a synonyom for the Western world or simply "the West". Quotation from Wikipedia:...
Paul Frost's user avatar
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9 votes
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"Die du" in Beethoven's An die Hoffnung

Die is Nominativ case here. Yes, du is referring to Hoffnung. The whole thing is an invocation to the personified hope (Hoffnung), which could also be written as "Du, die du so gern in heil'gen ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
8 votes

Does "befingert" have sexual connotations?

Yes, often (not always!) befingern is used with a sexual connotation. In your example, the subject is ein geiler Lüstling -which is something like "a horny debauchee". This leaves no doubt about ...
Arsak's user avatar
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8 votes
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In the song »Sah ein Knab' ein Röslein stehn«

The 's stands for the article "das". So the long form would be Und der wilde Knabe brach das Röslein auf der Heiden;
IQV's user avatar
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8 votes
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Denn Gott_e_ weiß ich will kein Engel sein

Link to the official "Rammstein - Engel" music video. Chorus in question starts at the 1 minute mark. Does anyone know why, in this line of the chorus, this song uses Gotte instead of Gott? Sure ....
mtwde's user avatar
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8 votes

"Kein lieber Gott" - Westernhagen lyric ("Ganz und gar", 1987)

Being a second-language English speaker, I would say your second translation is more appropriate: Because no one gives you guarantees; no beloved God does either, unfortunately But actually, lieber ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
8 votes

Why is "bleiben" conjugated as "bleibet" in the Bach choral "Jesus bleibet meine Freude"?

The use of bleibet is just archaic. Regarding your remarks on the use of vocative in the English translation, I agree with you, there is no vocative here. First, as you mentioned, Jesus is not ...
Jonathan Herrera's user avatar
7 votes
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Translation of the lyrics of “Der Lindenbaum”

This question touches on a fundamental point of German syntax. When referring to inalienable body parts (head, hand, foot etc.) German tends not to use possessive pronouns, but prefers the dative of ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 3,378
7 votes

Cultural context for "Abendland" and "Rettung" in this song lyric

Rettung des Abendlandes originally refers to the Ottoman wars in Europe, particularly to the defeat of the Ottomans at the second siege of Vienna 1683. I think you can guess how modern speakers could ...
Philipp's user avatar
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7 votes

Song Lyrics Translation/Interpretation - "Mensch" by Herbert Grönemeyer

To give some further context, this song (released 2002) deals with his grief about the death of this wife Anna who died in 1998 due to cancer. He mentions all the characteristics he saw in her, some ...
infinitezero's user avatar
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6 votes

“muss” with an object

Dich is not an object of musste but of haben. The same occurs in the (literal) English translation¹: I had to always have you, Jesus. Here you is the object of have and not of had to. What might ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
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6 votes
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Song lyrics help with grammar explanation / repair?

I think the literal English equivalent would be: Let one thing be said (to you). "Let one thing be clear." Sei, in this instance, is formally third person singular present subjunctive. The ...
David Vogt's user avatar
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6 votes
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In the song "muss i denn" , how should I understand "No sei mein' Lieb' vorbei"?

This is a well known traditional swabian (schwäbischer) song that was also made world-famous by Elvis Presley at some point. The swabian "no" (or "nåh" with a closed "a") ...
HalvarF's user avatar
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6 votes

The present perfect in songs

Leaving out a finite haben or sein is a stylistic device often used in poetry and songs. You can also find it in prose before the 20th century, and even in academic texts. You can use it nowadays if ...
Janka's user avatar
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6 votes

Why is "bleiben" conjugated as "bleibet" in the Bach choral "Jesus bleibet meine Freude"?

The literal meaning of the sentence is "Jesus stays my joy", so even though it looks strange, Jesus is the nominative object here. In modern German spelling, the phrase needs to be written ...
PMF's user avatar
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6 votes

In "klinget Glöckchen klinget", is "klinget" the imperative form?

Yes, the imperative of "klingen" in singular is "kling" or "klinge", but in plural it is "klingt" or "klinget" (where "klinget" is archaic ...
HalvarF's user avatar
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6 votes
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How do the sentences in these song lyrics connect to one another?

I see how this is hard to understand, even more with the wrong comma at the end of the first line. It's a shortened conditional that can be detected by looking at the word order: in the second ...
HalvarF's user avatar
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6 votes
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Transcribing a German song sung by a Turkish singer

Anatol, Anatol, Heute geh'n wir auf den Ball Auch wenn du mich müde anschaust, Wir gehn hin auf jeden Fall. Anatol, Anatol Wisch dir deine Augen aus, Trag den neuen schwarzen Anzug, Darin siehst du ...
5 votes
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Bleibe Ruhig - Der Erlkönig

The imperative of the verb bleiben for the second person singular is bleib or bleibe. Thus, the expression "Bleibe ruhig!" is correct.
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
5 votes
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Poetry; breaking the rules?

Poetry does not break the rules. What you need to take on board is that there are lots of different forms of German, both in time (diachronically) and in place (dialect variation). A lot of German ...
fdb's user avatar
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