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2

Your translation is correct and the phrase die Stirn bieten is a standard phrase. In the sample sentence it is a direct object and, hence, in the accusative case.


6

Im a German native speaker. Most people here dont seem to get it. "Zusammenrücken" in this context means something like having a conflict or possibly physical confrontation, not settling a conflict. Most dictionaries dont seem to know this meaning. That is because apparently this is supposed to be dialect. I can confirm that where i live this is ...


5

To my surprise my standard dictionary searches failed for what I consider a colloquial standard meaning. Zusammenrücken is here used in sense of DWDS: aneinandergeraten, in English e.g. to quarrel. It is more appropriate here, since it represents an active movement (in the non-figurative use), which can be subjected to more intense intention, while ...


9

The separable verb »zusammenrücken« means to move closer The verb »rücken« very often is used when furnitures are moved. It has no direct counterpart in English, so in English you have to use the verb "to move" (German: bewegen) instead. »Bewegen« is a more general term for movement, »rücken« is a special kind of movement. (You can't rücken ...


2

In this particular instance, the modal particle schon introduces a contrast to the preceding clause or statement, i.e. the meaning is adversative. I agree that the explanations given by Duden are somewhat lacking. However, the example under 6. can be rewritten to resemble the piece of dialogue you quoted: A: Von der Tätigkeit her ist die Stelle nicht sehr ...


4

Sentences in spoken language are very often ellipses. An ellipsis is a sentence where you omit a part of speech that easily can be reproduced from the context. For example, the first sentence spoken by Gustav doesn't contain a subject: Macht nicht viel Sinn, Maik Grasser zu entführen. Doesn't make much sense to kidnap Maik Grasser. But every German ...


0

Both words mean almost the same thing. However, "sämtlich" emphasizes that everything is clearly meant. Duden says nachdrücklich für all (emphatically for all) DWDS ausnahmslos alle (without exception all) Why was it changed when you really meant "each and every document"? Probably because the difference is marginal and "...


0

I am afraid the difference is oversimplified language. The meaning is the same. Or maybe someone likes to "correct" your texts.


3

In this context "Bock" would have the meaning of "Lust", meaning something like "I am up for it"


1

"Sie ist vor drei Tagen bei mir im Club aufgetaucht." "Sie ist vor drei Tagen im Club aufgetaucht." Sentence 1 implies that it is the speaker's club. Either he owns it or he frequently resides there. In both cases it is most likely implied that it happened at a moment where the speaker was present at the club. In sentence 2 the speaker ...


1

Auftauchen means show up, so we can safely exclude, that she was with me. While I was in the club is possible, but if this is the only cause, it would likely be phrased Ich habe sie vor drei Tagen im Club getroffen. It could possibly be club of the speaking person, but for use of that phrase it would be sufficient, that the person has a special relation to ...


4

It means that he eats large portions of vegetable. A "Schüssel" is a bowl, bigger than an ordinary dish. I do not think one should take it in the literal sense that he actually fills some bowls and eats the vegetable contained in them, but we should understand it in the sense of "very much". The ending weise occurs also in "...


8

It's a combination of the suffix -weise, which can be used to form an indication of quantity, and Schüssel, which simply means bowl. So literally schüsselweise means he eats some number of bowls of green vegetables. In a recipe, for example, you might read man gebe das Mehl löffelweise hinzu, meaning add the flour spoon by spoon. In another variation there ...


3

The German tun und lassen is a fixed phrase (quite frequently used, see DWDS examples), emphasizing, that you not only have the choice, how you use something (my opinion: 2nd level choice), but even if you use it at all (1st level decision). My best translation is I may do, whatever I want - even nothing if I feel like it.


1

The answer of Henning is already very good, I just want to dive a little bit deeper into the „lassen“ part. The „tun und lassen“ phrase is usually used in combination with things that have a negative effect. Lets take your example with the car: The guy sais: I can do with it whatever I want (e.g. drive it against a wall). But I can also choose to NOT do ...


5

"Lassen" in this sentence is a bit like an antonyme to "tun". It means something along the lines of "to not do something", "to refrain from doing something" or "to let something happen (without doing something about it)". To get a better idea, you might want to look at the related verb "zulassen". ...


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