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6

It's "(so) oder (so ähnlich)": "so" = "in this way". "so ähnlich" = "in a similar way". By contrast, "so oder so" means "either way" or "in any case".


6

Nowadays, the word Haus has two distinct broad meanings that in English are captured by the words house and home, respectively. Haus in the sense of house refers to the building. Here, the dative and the accusative case are typically used without -e in contemporary German. Ich bin im Haus. (I am in the house.) Ich gehe zum Haus. (I walk to the house.) ...


5

First let it be said that this must be dealing mostly with spoken, non (normative) standard speech. (2) is definitely OK and productive in spoken Austrian, but I would never write it (also because using articles for people's names is considered non-standard). An equivalent alternative to it would be Was für Bücher haben den Fritz beeindruckt? The ...


5

Einige sehen die Notwendigkeit die deutsche Sprache zu gendern, d.h. darauf zu achten nicht nur das generische Maskulinum zu verwenden. Im Zuge dessen wird das Partizip Präsens verwendet und daraus ein Substantiv geformt. Teilnehmer -> teilnehmen -> teilnehmend -> Teilnehmende Die Bedeutung ist identisch*. Weitere häufige Konstruktionen sind Lehrende und ...


4

"Stellen" actually means "to put". You can combine it with "eine Frage". "eine Frage stellen" = "to ask a question", or literally "to put a question" "fragen" = "to ask" Ich frage. - I ask. / I am asking. Ich stelle eine Frage. - I ask a question. / I am asking a question. Ich frage meine Mutter. - I ask my mum. / I am asking my mum. Ich stelle meiner ...


4

Eine Frage stellen is the same as fragen. You use the former when you want to stress the fact that you're asking or to avoid a sentence without object: Er stellte eine Frage. instead of Er fragte. (which likely prompts Was fragte er denn?). Stellen by itself means to put.


4

Ich habe leider keine historischen Belege für meine Antwort, kann deshalb nur aus meinem allgemeinen Sprachgefühl / meiner Erfahrung als Muttersprachler sprechen: Arretieren wird heute hauptsächlich in der Bedeutung „festsetzen“ verwendet. Ich verstehe die Liste so, dass wenn jemand arretiert wird, dann wird er festgehalten um ihn dann ggf. einer Befragung ...


4

Yes, you can use it, although I think it's more common to use it in this order: A: Wenn wir zum Europapark wollen, müssen wir aber früh aufstehen! B: Für mich ist das egal, aber C ist definitiv kein Frühaufsteher! A: If we wanted to go to the Europapark tomorrow, we'd have to get up early B: I don't mind, but C is no morning person. That way you ...


3

Für mich ist das egal is grammatically correct, but in my view, besides from being somewhat unusual, it is less clear than Mir ist das egal. Mir ist das egal means I don't care [about this]. Für mich ist das egal could mean the same but it could also be meant more objectively. A better translation would then be something like This doesn't matter as far as I ...


3

Nobody seems to be mentioning the massive cultural wellspring that this quote spread through society, the movie "Lola Rennt" (Run Lola Run). https://www.theguardian.com/football/worldcup2006blog/2006/jul/03/theballisroundandkeepson In the German film Run, Lola, Run there's a scene before the title sequence in which an odd-looking referee throws the ball up ...


3

bereinigen Sort out something that's upset you, sort out ("Settle an argument") reinigen Remove dirt, stains or similar from something (clean something, clean up) Explain: But you can't say "... mein Zimmer bereinigen" (as far as I know). You can clean (reinigen) your room, or clean up (aufräumen) the room. In German duden "bereinigen" is defined as ...


2

The word "Hause" is basically a remnant of the past German dialect. In that old Dialect, which you can read in some older Books like Goethes Iphigenie auf Tauris: "O süße Stimme! Vielwillkommener Ton der Muttersprache in einem fremden Lande!". Today you wouldn't say "Lande", you would simply say "Land". Back then it would be normal to say things like "zu ...


1

(Extended earlier comment) I guess, it should read: Im Sperrfeuer instead. As you can see here (Book title Im Völkerringen, printed 1915), I and J are quite difficult to distinguish at that time. This already applies to print, but handwriting is even more difficult.


1

Nach meinem Sprachgefühl ist es zunächst richtig, zwischen den beiden Ausdrücken ("Versuchsteilnehmer"/"Versuchsteilnehmende") einen Bedeutungsunterschied zu vermuten, etwa: Die Substantivform drückt eine Identität aus (Teilnehmer vor oder nach dem Versuch), das Partizip betont die gerade andauernde Tätigkeit (Person, die gerade am Versuch teilnimmt, anstatt ...


1

First of all, your translation of the sentence is wrong. The meaning is: There/it is not much time until departure. Both in German and English, the words es, it or there are here only used as expletives. That is words, which are used to fill up a void, just to fulfil grammatical requirements, in this case for a subject in the sentence. For simpler usage,...


1

There is not much time left until the event of departure, the closure of the gate. "For" would imply that the departure process in itself might take too long, which is frequently the case when aircraft line up for departure but uninteresting for the passengers who try to make it for the gate in time. "Geben" in conjunction with time is used when an action ...


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