49

You seem to have had a misunderstanding about what case is. Case is not an attribute of a sentence, but the attribute of a noun phrase, which is a part of a sentence. This is the analysis of your example sentence (be aware of spelling, your original sentence is flawed regarding capitalization). The square brackets mark the boundaries of the noun phrases. ...


21

This construction is usually called "predicative nominative" ("prädikativer Nominativ", "Gleichsetzungsnominativ"), rather than "nominative object". There are a couple of verbs that have it, in particular "sein", "werden", "heißen", and "bleiben", and some more verbs where the predicative nominative is connected by "als", such as "gelten", "sich fühlen", "...


17

'like' functions as a preposition in this English sentence, and while (all?) prepositions in German decline the noun they're acting on, the word 'wie' is not a preposition. Rather, it is a conjunction; in this case, while your translation is more idiomatic, the grammar function of 'wie' corresponds more to the English 'as': ... and, of course, many people ...


15

Beides ist richtig. Kein Scanner gefunden. ist die Kurzform von Es wurde kein Scanner gefunden. Dagegen ist Keinen Scanner gefunden. die Kurzform von so etwas wie Ich habe/Das System hat keinen Scanner gefunden.


12

Ein Arm is nominative because it is the subject of the sentence. The sentence could also be written als follows: Ein Arm war Lummox gewachsen. "Lummox" is dative. Because there is no article, the cases look the same, with the exception of genitive. One can see it's dative if Lummox is replaced by a pronoun: Ihm war ein Arm gewachsen. Wachsen is one of ...


11

In addition to (or variation of) Jonathan's perfect answer, just because sometimes looking at something from different angles may help getting familiar with it: You seem to come from a language without "cases", therefore the concept is alien to you. Don't be afraid, it is neither difficult, nor is it restricted to German. All indo-european ...


8

The word "sein" is one of the few verbs which uses a nominative object so the sentence contains two elements in nominative case. Using a male word you can see that the nominative is used twice: Er ist mein Vater.


8

The word Arbeit is female: Nominativ: die Genetiv: der Dativ: der Akkusativ die but mit requires the the 3rd case (Dativ).


8

Die Antwort ist: nein. "Existieren" hat kein richtiges Komplement. Das "es" im Beispiel ist das berühmt-berüchtigte Füll-Es, das hier immer wieder zu Fragen führt. Dieses "es" ist funktional nicht das gleiche, wie das Regen-Es. Es regnet heute. Es gibt einen Grund. In diesen beiden Sätzen ist "es" das Subjekt, und es bleibt erhalten, wenn man den Satz ...


8

It is just English that is complicated here. You are absent: You are missing. You are absent, and I feel that: I am missing you. In one case the absent person is the subject, in the other the person feeling the absence. The verb to miss has two different functions here. The German verb fehlen does not behave that way. You are absent: Du fehlst. ...


8

Short answer: für asks for the accusative case, Bruder is singular masculine, so one has to use ihren there, because this is the accusative masculine singular inflection of ihr. Additional comments: In general, you should be able to determine the case by searching for the preposition in some dictionary or even on Google. Actually, knowing the case taken ...


7

In this sentence "ein Hund" is in the nominative because it is a predicate noun. It is a noun that restates the subject. Predicate nouns can occur only with the verbs sein, heißen, werden, and occasionally bleiben. Predicate nouns are also taken by certain verbs in combination with als e.g. gelten als, sich erweisen als.


7

I think it all trace down to 'sein' being a copula (linking verb) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copula_(linguistics) these type of verbs just link two things together but don't communicate any action. Therefore 'meine Mutter' it is not the direct object, even in the other languages that I was thinking it is not direct object.


7

You can either say: Riesenaufwand, which is a noun in its own. Or you can also say Das ist ein riesiger Aufwand if you want to describe the kind of effort more precisely.


7

In deiner Frage und deinem Kommentar zur Frage tauchen drei verschiedene Phänomene auf: Bei einem Doppel-/Gleichsetzungsnominativ erfordert das Verb zwei Nominative; der eine ist ein Subjekt, der zweite ein Nominativobjekt. Solche Verben sind beispielsweise sein oder werden: Er (=Nom.) ist ein kluger Junge (=Nom.). Sie (=Nom.) wird Polizistin (=...


6

Yes, the dative would be "Den Kindern", however, that is the subject of the sentence so it should be the nominative, "Die Kinder". Also, "Ihrem" probably should not be capitalized since that would be translated as "your", making it read "on your father". If the intent is "on their father" then it should be "von ihrem Vater".


6

You have misunderstood adjective declination. Adjectives used before a noun are declined in every case (including the nominative). You can find a complete reference here. Adjectives used as a predicate are not declined: Der Ort ist perfekt.


5

Das Subjekt ist in diesem Satz "ich". Die Satzstellung hat keinen Einfluss auf den Fall (Kasus). Richtig ist also nur Den Stuhl habe ich zum Tisch geschoben.


5

Was du hier siehst, ist ein sogenanntes Subjektsprädikativ, das, zusammen mit dem Verb (das kann nur "sein" und "werden" sein), das Prädikat des Satzes bildet. Das Subjektsprädikativ steht wie das Subjekt im Nominativ, gehört aber zum Prädikat. Manche Leute bezeichnen das Subjektsprädikativ auch als "Nominativ-Objekt". Wie oben ...


5

In this case the demonstrative pronoun has to be in nominative and thus be dieser. Though, in German the noun Laptop can either be masculine or neutral, so both dieser and dieses would be correct.


5

I don't know who told you that stuff about subjects in first position mean something special but consider Rule #2 of German word order: German grammar in general doesn't care about the position of items in declarative clauses. Of course, you remember Rule #1 of German word order: The core of the predicate verb is always the second item in a declarative ...


5

In addition to Daniel's answer, and with respect to Denis' additional question what's the difference between Riesenaufwand and riesiger Aufwand: a) Style In all languages people can chose how to express something, without the "core meaning" of what is being said being different. "Riesenaufwand" (and similar contraptions such as Riesenärger, Riesenmist, ...


5

Yes, and just to supplement Glorfindel's answer with a little further explanation: The er in the German sentence is not only not the object of a preposition (as already explained), but it is the subject, naturally nominative, of a verb that has been left implicit, since the conjunction normally introduces a clause. A close English equivalent completed with ...


4

Meine Mutter is nominative in the sentence you gave. Sie ist meine Mutter. it receives the action of the verb. To my mind, the notion that your mother is receiving the action of being makes no sense. Even in sentences that have recipients, they're often dative so this is not a reliable test. To suggest a better way to determine if a noun phrase is ...


4

Als Ergänzung zur richtigen Antwort von O. R. Mapper: Auch das wäre richtig: Keine Scanner gefunden. Das ist die Kurzform sowohl von Es wurden keine Scanner gefunden. als auch von Ich habe/Das System hat keine Scanner gefunden. Wenn man nämlich von keinen Dingen bzw. keinem Ding spricht, kann man frei zwischen Einzahl und Mehrzahl ...


4

A more literal translation would be "what do you like to eat the most?". Also, what Nathan says (his comment should be an answer).


4

Unterscheide die beiden Sätze Auch Tom gefällst du nicht sehr und Auch Tom gefällt Dir nicht sehr Im 1. Fall ist du das Subjekt (erkennbar an der 2. Person Singular Du gefällst). Tom ist hier das Dativobjekt, allerdings nicht erkennbar, da der Name unverändert bleibt. Ersetzen wir Tom durch Er, so wird dieser Satz Auch ihm gefällst du nicht sehr Das ...


4

The nominative is the "normal" thing - compare the English "there is no doubt". The accusative in your second example is just the quirk in the German language that we express existance of something with "geben" - a transitive verb that wants (at least) an accusative object. (while English happily uses "is") Replace &...


4

You analyzed it correctly. The part "der Löwen" is in genitive case. It is a genitive attribute of the noun "König". A genitive attribute contains the information to whom the referred noun belongs. Here it says, that the King belongs to the lions. The English translation is Der König der Löwen The king of the lions The original english ...


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