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36 votes
Accepted

Why do we have to make "peinlich" start with a capital letter and also end with -s in this sentence?

What you see here is what is called Substantivierung - An adjective is elevated to a noun (dt: Substantiv) das Peinliche ("the embarrassing") is used as a noun in the sentence (after all, it is ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 65k
34 votes

Feminine noun with suffix -ung that is not the result of a "Verb to Noun process"

I wrote a little Python script (see below) to find candidate words. It takes a dictionary and yields all uppercase words that end on ung unless: there exists a corresponding lowercase word ending on ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
  • 21.9k
30 votes
Accepted

Feminine noun with suffix -ung that is not the result of a "Verb to Noun process"

I think that die Zeitung fulfills the criteria.
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
27 votes
Accepted

Is the word "Unterlagen" masculine or feminine?

The das in the first example is not an article since an article would have to come just before a noun. It's a demonstrative pronoun roughly translatable as "that", although "this/these&...
RDBury's user avatar
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22 votes
Accepted

Origin of the word "Abenteuer"?

das Abenteuer In 12th century the Old French word aventure was imported into the German language. In Middle High German it soon became aventiure and soon (still in Middle High German) v turned ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
17 votes
Accepted

“Eine Flasche Wasser” versus “Eine Wasserflasche”

It's really pretty much the same in English, a bottle of water vs. a water bottle. While a Flasche Wasser certainly has some water in it, a Wasserflasche can be both full or empty. It's even more ...
Ingmar's user avatar
  • 19.3k
17 votes

Why Bette in the first quatrain of the nursery rhyme "Müde bin ich"

The final "e" in "Bette" indicates the dative case and is not a plural form. It normally isn't used in contemporary German anymore, however there are some fixed expressions like "zu Hause" where it is ...
fragezeichen's user avatar
  • 2,205
17 votes

What definite/indefinite article do Germans use when they don't know/forget the noun they're talking about?

Very often you have a vague idea of what you want to say, and with this idea often comes some words that have similar meanings, but still are not exactly what you want to say. So you often use their ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
15 votes

“Eine Flasche Wasser” versus “Eine Wasserflasche”

I (native German speaker) disagree with the assessment that your teacher is "full of waste products", but I do think she is being unnecessarily unsystematic. eine Flasche Wasser is a quantity of a ...
O. R. Mapper's user avatar
  • 8,777
14 votes
Accepted

Warum ist ‘Deutsche Grammophon’ feminin?

Du hast recht, dass Deutsche Grammophon feminin ist. Gleichzeitig ist das Grammophon unbestritten neutral. Des Rätsels Lösung ist, dass die Deutsche Grammophon laut Wikipedia 1898 als die Deutsche ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
14 votes
Accepted

Is "zu" used to describe purpose?

It should be zu Besuch, which is more of a fixed expression. Otherwise, yes it can be used with many nouns to express a purpose. Zum (zu dem) and zur (zu der) are contractions that are used in ...
Chieron's user avatar
  • 3,562
14 votes
Accepted

What is »Trööt«?

Trööt is an onomatopoeia. It is meant to symbolise the sound that you get out of a trumpet (or other brass instrument) or a party horn. Various types of the latter are frequently present at ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
14 votes
Accepted

Why is the verb in the first position here?

This is not a verb. It is a noun: Das Laufen. (English: the running.) But it's a special kind of noun. It's a nominalized verb. (German: Substantiviertes Verb). But this term is misleading. A better ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
13 votes

What to do when two nouns are there?

‘Two nouns’ is a rather broad designator. It can happen in a number of cases: two different objects Ich bringe dem Herrn einen Kaffee one object, one noun describing the other (apposition) Ich ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
13 votes
Accepted

Der oder Die 50 Prozent Rabatt?

Nach der Hinzufügung von Bindestrichen in ersterem Fall handelt es sich um zwei grammatikalisch verschiedene, aber korrekte Alternativen: Der 50-Prozent-Rabatt (gilt) Hierbei handelt es sich um ein ...
amadeusamadeus's user avatar
13 votes

Haar vs Haare. A different slant on a well-worn question

The latter, in my opinion, i.e. a matter of style. Both Sie hat langes Haar and Ricardo hat kurze Haare work equally well.
Ingmar's user avatar
  • 19.3k
12 votes

Was meint ein Österreicher, wenn er am Telefon fragt "Welche Klappe haben Sie bitte"?

Eine Ergänzung bzw. Richtigstellung der Antwort von splattne: Eine Klappe ist, wie schon von splattne richtig beantwortet, die Durchwahlnummer oder Nebenstelle. Sie ist in Österreich aber nicht auf ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
12 votes

What is a tower crane in German

Most of the population — especially small children who are generally fascinated by construction sites — would not think twice and call the thing in the image a Kran. However, you are correct that the ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
12 votes
Accepted

Wann müssen Nomen zusammengeschrieben werden?

Die Regeln, mit denen man aus zwei Nomen (Substantiven) ein neues Nomen bilden kann, sind eigentlich zu kompliziert, als dass man sie hier vollständig beschreiben könnte. Ich möchte es dennoch so ...
Björn Friedrich's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Declension of "Kinder" in "nicht nur für, sondern auch von Kinder(n)"

Du kannst schreiben: Es stellte sich heraus, dass die Spielzeuge nicht nur für, sondern auch von Kindern produziert werden. Erklärt wird das zum Beispiel bei canoo.net: Wenn zwei Attribute oder ...
Matthias's user avatar
  • 19k
11 votes

Feminine noun with suffix -ung that is not the result of a "Verb to Noun process"

Another, less common, word that might fit your criteria (and that was not found by the script) is die Innung (the guild). Although it seems that originally there was the verb innen in middle-high ...
Graipher's user avatar
  • 211
11 votes

Is the word "Unterlagen" masculine or feminine?

The das in the first sentence is not the article going with Unterlagen, it’s actually the subject, like for example in Das ist schön. The Unterlagen shows no article because the indefinite article “...
Stephie's user avatar
  • 24.1k
11 votes
Accepted

Comparing using a noun vs comparing using an adjective

You base assumption that "productive" or "produktiv" respectively is a noun in either English or German is faulty. In both languages the form of the sentence you use requires the ...
planetmaker's user avatar
  • 10.7k
11 votes
Accepted

Zeitung vs. Beitung

It's not Beitung, it's actually Zeitung. In the blackletter typeface used for the headline the Z looks much like a B. There are "modern" blackletter typefaces which use a Z shaped like in ...
RHa's user avatar
  • 16k
10 votes

How can I better learn noun genders?

I've analyzed the data and made a visualization that helps to guide beginners about "guessing" gender of singular German nouns. Interactive Visulazation and notes, sources, etc The bigger ...
philshem's user avatar
  • 551
10 votes

Case confusion: mit öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln

Yes, it is dative case, you are right. But Verkehrsmittel is used in plural here. So it should be "mit öffentlichen Verkehrsmitteln". PS. You can think of it as "by means of public transportation" (...
Eller's user avatar
  • 4,658
10 votes
Accepted

What is “Magen Darm”?

"Magen Darm" is wrong, it needs an hyphen: "Magen-Darm". That is short and colloquial for all kind of deseases that affect stomach and intestine at the same time (=diarrhea with vomiting/sickness). ...
Iris's user avatar
  • 8,547
10 votes

Why Bette in the first quatrain of the nursery rhyme "Müde bin ich"

Summary: In über meinem Bette sein the word Bette is not plural. It's an antiquated dative singular often found in poetry. Wikipedia quotation: (from the wikipedia article about Dative case, ...
Frank from Frankfurt's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Are all animals that end in "-e" feminine?

Here are a few counterexamples: der Hase, der Löwe, der Riese, der Junge. In general, though, you can safely add an -n to form the plural (just watch out for "das Knie, die Knie"). You might enjoy ...
I. Riley's user avatar
  • 136
10 votes
Accepted

Noun for a female bird?

For the generic noun "Vogel", there is no feminine counterpart ending on "-in", so the correct expression is "weiblicher Vogel". By contrast, for chickens, there is "...
Tsundoku's user avatar
  • 2,572

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