New answers tagged

0 votes

Es gibt Verspätung vs Es gibt eine Verspätung

"Der Zug hat eine Verspätung" is definitively the usual expression to say that a particular train is delayed. I'd read "Es gibt Verspätung" as a more general and slightly ...
user avatar
2 votes

Es gibt Verspätung vs Es gibt eine Verspätung

Der Zug hat Verspätung is an example for Nullartikel, subsection Abstrakta: you will not qualify the delay further, but just point out, that in-time does not apply. This is similar to The train is ...
user avatar
  • 24.5k
1 vote

Es gibt Verspätung vs Es gibt eine Verspätung

Both examples rather sound unusual, you would rather say "Der Zug hat Verspätung", but it definitely sounds better without the article.
user avatar
3 votes

Es gibt Verspätung vs Es gibt eine Verspätung

My interpretation is that "Verspätung haben" is one of a number of fixed phrases involving "haben". Some others are "recht haben" = "to be correct", "zu ...
user avatar
  • 8,016

Top 50 recent answers are included