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45

Yes 36.000€ is 36000 €. In Germany groups of thousands are separated by . and in exchange we have a decimal comma like 36.000,56 € as a result of: (36000 + 56 / 100) €. Just to mention it: If there is a date, in German it would be: day.month.year, so 6.12.2019 (sometimes written as 6. Dezember 2019 or 06.12.2019) is Dec 6th, 2019.


40

To stress one day you can say Ich kann das Buch an einem einzigen Tag lesen.


40

No, that is not common practice. You can spell out the digits "sieben-sieben" or the number "siebenundsiebzig" or can say "zweimal die Sieben" (Numbers are generally feminine in German). "Doppel-..." is commonly used for letters, however: "Bitte schreibt man mit Doppel-t"


23

It is already correct answered: It is not a common practice. But there are exceptions: The zero. There are two usages for the Doppel-Null: There are double-zero agents (Doppel-Null-Agenten) in James Bond and the American Roulette also contains a "Doppelnull" This expressions are not origin German, they are calques of English expressions. The Six The "...


21

As shown in the example usage on wikipedia, Germans use , as the decimal seperator and . to group to thousands. Germany: 1.234.567,89 USA: 1,234,567.89


18

With Ich kann das Buch an einem Tag lesen. you already express that you can read the whole book within one day. Depending on the context there might be rare cases where you want to eliminate any doubt. Possibilities are: Adding komplett: Ich kann das komplette Buch an einem Tag lesen. You could also use durchlesen: Ich kann das Buch an einem Tag ...


17

It can be nominative: Heute ist der vierzehnte Februar. Or dative: Am vierzehnten Februar war ich in Urlaub (already mentioned by Benedikt Brünner) Or accusative: [Captain's logbook]: 32° 12' W 14° 34' S, wir schreiben den vierzehnten Februar. Or genitive: Am Morgen des vierzehnten Februars sammelten wir uns zur Abreise. So you see, all four cases ...


17

in The shortest variant would be using the temporal preposition in instead of an, as you already found out. In this usage in already implies that something happens within the time span further specified. It should therefore be clear that a single day only is needed. Ich kann das Buch in einem Tag lesen. I can read that Book within a day There is some ...


16

There is no general rule, but I once heard that secretaries in Germany learn to spell out phone numbers digit by digit for a good reason: In contrast to other languages, German “switches” the order for numbers greater than 12. While in English, for example, you say twenty-four for 24, in German it would be Vier-und-Zwanzig. That could lead to problems for ...


15

This is how I would normally write them (I’m German): I'm not really consistent with the U, as you can see. Of course everyone has their own handwriting style, some use cursive, some don’t, but almost no one writes it the way you learn in school. People are flexible. I mainly uploaded this to contradict jmiserez’ claim that the 4 has to be closed. I didn’t ...


15

Kurze Antwort: Die Entwicklung der Art wie man Zahlen schreibt und die Entwicklung der Art wie man Zahlen ausspricht, haben voneinander unabhängig stattgefunden und haben nichts miteinander zu tun. Es gibt daher keinen Grund anzunehmen, dass es heute einen Zusammenhang geben sollte. Eventuell bestehende Ähnlichkeiten sind zufällig entstanden. Warum nennt ...


14

Above all, it's good to know. Speaking for Austria, it's not very common in spoken language (any more -- used to be much more frequent), unless you are on the telephone, say, and want to make extra certain that no mistakes are made. It's routinely used in radio communications, too, much like the English "niner". Personally I use it for important things like ...


13

The rules for recording large numbers are not much different from English. The main difference to English is that in German, , and . are swapped. The comma is used as a decimal point, and the dot is used for grouping thousands (optionally, can be the empty string or a blank as well). Examples 123456789 German: 123.456.789 alternatives: 123 456&...


12

Germany is a big country (80mil people) Depending on when and where you learned writing it tends to be different. But yes I did learn cursive writing. And this was what it was supposed to look like: GDR Handwriting Just look at this article for some pictures on how "official" Handwriting is/was supposed to look in Germany. In the picture below you see where ...


12

Laut dem Grimm-Wörterbuch hat drittehalb die Bedeutung zwei und ein halbes, das Prinzip dürfte ähnlich wie bei der Uhrzeit sein (halb drei = 2:30 Uhr). Demnach sind Dritthalbtausend Jahre 2500 Jahre. Diese Ausdruckweise scheint nur vereinzelt um das 15. Jahrhundert verwendet worden zu sein. Heute würde sie kaum noch verstanden werden. Der Autor des ...


12

If your translation doesn't have to be close to the original, I would say something like: Das Buch schaffe ich an einem Tag. Or: Für das Buch brauche ich keinen Tag.


11

No way should you learn Sütterlin - nobody uses this anymore. I guess you don't even have to learn a "new handwriting" at all. If you try to handwrite "Arial", you'll be fine :-) (Which is requested on most official forms anyway, when they say to fill out in "Druckschrift" or "Druckbuchstaben - could also be "Blockbuchstaben" or "Blockschrift", then they ...


11

From my understanding, "zwo" is a replacement for the correct "zwei" that has emerged and became relatively widespread when telephones and radio communication were introduced because with bad signal quality affecting especially consonants, "zwei" might easily be confused with "drei". I would suppose that part of it becoming widespread was through the ...


11

I recommend to rephrase the statement in German, but this is difficult if you want to avoid to use the noun „Stadt“ twice: „Die Stadt ist Nummer 45 auf der Liste der schönsten Städte des Landes.“ „Unter den schönsten Städten des Landes nimmt [Stadtname] den 45. Platz ein.“ „Unter den schönsten Städten des Landes steht [Stadtname] an 45. Stelle.“ „Unter den ...


11

For years in the range 1100 to 1999 the "zwölfhundert" variant is common in Germany: The house was built in the year 1980. Das Haus wurde im Jahr neunzehnhundertachtzig gebaut. The variant "tausendzweihundert" is very, very uncommon for years in that range. The variant "zwölfhundert" sometimes is used for other things but it ...


11

Die Annahme, dass es zwischen "ein paar" und "viele" eine Grenze gibt, ist schon falsch. Während "viele" sich auf eine Anzahl größer als "normal" bezieht, beschreibt "ein paar" eine geringe Anzahl oder eine geringe verhältnismäßige Dichte. Wenn ich mir ein paar belegte Brote fürs Büro mache, und es sind z. B. fünf größere, dann sind das im Normalfall schon ...


10

The answer to your confusion is that time complements are in accusative. To clear why that answer is not enough to cover your question let me add the following: You suppose that 'Sie ist ein Jahr alt.' is in nominative. If that were the case you are right in writing 'Sie ist ein Tag alt.' (!) since the case should be the same independent on the ...


10

Zwo can be used for zwei. It's mostly used to make sure you mean zwei, not drei. (For the same reason people sometimes say Juno and Julei instead of Juni und Juli.) To me, there is no difference in formality / informality, and neither are there social stigmas.


10

"1. Weltkrieg" "Erster Weltkrieg" The difference is only that in one case the number is written as number and in the other case the number is written as word - just as you can write "the 1st word" or "the first word" in English. Note that the word "Erster" changes in a sentence like an ajective would do: Der Erste Weltkrieg war schlimm. Im Ersten ...


10

Yes and no. It's all about context. When saying something like "one fifteen" (Eins Fünfzehn) it can be understood as 1.15 . Like in Das macht dann eins fünfzehn (1.15€) Zusammen ergibt das eine Summe von zwei fünfzig (2.50€) (Please note: It's more likely you will hear something like Zwei Euro Fünfzig or Zwei Euro und Fünfzig Cent) But, when ...


9

The answer strongly depends of the intended accuracy, the nature of the numbers and the type of text. My private rule of thumb is the following: For scientific texts, manuals, etc., I would write out 1 to 12, if they are natural numbers (in contrast to real numbers), and nothing else. Seien a und b zwei Elemente der Menge X. – Let a and b be two elements ...


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