30

"schaffen" has two meanings: to get something managed, to create, to produce something "geschafft" is the past of the 1st, "geschaffen" is the past of the 2nd


14

They are both technically correct. Your answer, however, is the one that makes more sense in the context. The infinitive clause is final, i.e. it describes a purpose. Did you go to Paris in order to see the Eiffel Tower, or in order to have seen it? In my opinion, the former makes more sense. The latter is possible when thinking about a bucket list scenario ...


12

In this case the difference is not related to tenses. Erlernen and lernen are two different verbs. More often than not er can be identified with a (non-separable) prefix that implies to do the things until the goal is reached ("Vorsilbe, die eine zielgerichtete Handlung ausdrückt"). Hence, erlernen is to learn something until you master it, while lernen ...


11

German has the classic imperative like Pass auf! Bleib stehen! and a number of other forms that can be used as replacement forms to express the imperative: Infinitive Strict order, sounds very military Aufpassen! Stehenbleiben! Participle Very militarian language as well, works with separable verbs only Aufgepasst! Stehengeblieben! Stillgestanden! ...


11

"Hereingekrabbelt" is a variation on "Hereinspaziert", which is an informal way of saying, "Come in". (More formal alternatives include "Kommen Sie herein" and "Bitte treten Sie ein".) The construction is essentially a past participle as a replacement for the imperative ("Ersatzform des Imperativs"). Another example is "Rauchen verboten" ("Smoking ...


10

unterhalten These are two different verbs with different meaning but same spelling (see link to the DWDS dictionary) Only the more common meaning to entertain, chat is non-separable and hence does not have the ge- prefix on inflection. The other meaning to hold sth. under sth. is separable and inflected to untergehalten. For all inflections also see: ...


9

Es gibt überhaupt keinen Grund, die Schreibweise der Vergangenheitsform aus dem Englischen zu übernehmen. Man nimmt die Grundform und passt sie den grammatischen Begebenheiten des Deutschen an. "Gelikt" ist die einzig richtige Form: holen - geholt machen - gemacht streamen - gestreamt twittern - getwittert liken - gelikt


8

Kommt darauf, ob es noch ein zugehöriges Substantiv gibt oder nicht (welches direkt folgen kann, aber je nach Satzkonstruktion nicht muss, wie beispielsweise in Chirlus Kommentar). Das bisher Erreichte ist nicht genug Hier wird substantiviert, daher groß (substantiviertes 2. Partizip, um genau zu sein). Das bisher erreichte Ziel war nur der erste ...


8

Beide Formen sind prinzipiell möglich. Die Vorsilbe »durch« ist dabei unerheblich. Das Verb »schleifen« kann sowohl zu »geschliffen« als auch zu »geschleift« werden: Ich habe das Messer geschliffen. Ich habe den Sack mit den Paketen zu Post geschleift. Das gibt es auch bei anderen Verben, z.B. »saugen«: Ich habe Staub gesaugt. Das Baby hat an ...


8

Only the forms begleitete, begleitet are correct. There is however the verb gleiten (to slide). So one can imagine an ad hoc formation of a transitive verb begleiten in analogy to befahren or begehen, as in *Ich begleite das Eis. The past tense would then be: *Ich beglitt das Eis. This makes me smile and is certainly not standard.


8

I hope your teacher said Ich bin schwimmen gegangen. That means you went to the pool. By any means of transport. In contrary Ich bin schwimmen gefahren. means you went by car, bus, tram etc. OR it means you went on a trip with swimming as the main topic. That is because fahren can also mean to go on an excursion. Context decides this. Hast du ...


7

The word order in your first example puts an emphasis on what happened to your teeth: Ich habe meine Zähne zu putzen vergessen Ich habe meine Zähne zu Hause vergessen Ich habe meine Zähne grün angemalt und sie anschließend fotografiert If you reorder to "ich habe vergessen", the emphasis shifts to the fact that you forgot something: Ich habe ...


7

Bekommen as a transitive verb (meaning to get) forms the perfect tense with haben, like almost all transitive verbs: Ich habe ganz schön Angst bekommen. Lisa hat eine Eins in Mathe bekommen. On the other hand, bekommen as an intransitive verb (meaning to agree with, of things not people) has sein as the auxiliary: Der viele Wein ist ihm nicht bekommen....


7

Wenn jemand liket o. Ä. sagt, wird er mit ziemlicher Sicherheit die deutsche Konjugation im Kopf haben und nicht die aussprachegleiche englische. Deswegen ist es eigentlich ziemlich absurd, hier die Orthografie englischer Konjugationsformen (also z. B. liked) zu verwenden. Drei Beispiele, die dies verdeutlichen: *Er liked den Link. (Er mag den Link.) Der ...


7

It doesn't. The second example is more 'correct' and sounds more professional, the first example is somewhat easier to parse.


7

Typically, the conjugated verb (here: haben) and whatever parts of the verbal phrase remain (here: gelitten) form the Verbklammer (verb bracket) and are often considered including the entire sentence with the exception of the first fragment which precedes the bracket. Thus, the second version of the sentence sounds more professional and of a higher register,...


7

Seinen Geburtsort besucht habe ich allerdings noch nicht. Für diejenigen, die an die Falschheit dieses Satzes glauben oder an seiner Richtigkeit zweifeln, habe ich ein Beispiel. Nehmen wir an, eine berühmte Persönlichkeit wurde in Stadt A geboren und starb in Stadt B. Dann ließe sich sagen: Am Grab bin ich häufig, seinen Geburtsort besucht habe ich ...


7

In colloquial German, there is not much of a difference. Many people confuse Präteritum and Perfekt and even use both tensen within the same sentence. In standard German, there is, basically, the principle of congruence: when events occur or states are in the same narrative time, then the tenses should conform. Let me first give a simpler example: Er sieht, ...


6

It is not immediately clear whether uploaden and downloaden in German should be treated as monolithic words or as having separable prefixes. Therefore, geuploadet, upgeloadet, gedownloadet and downgeloadet can all be found in the wild, as can spelling variants with -ed. If you have only encountered one version per verb, that is by accident. The general ...


6

I think there are two reasons for that anomality: Präteritum indeed is much shorter and since sein and haben are used very often it is very economical to reduce speach length here Germans generally prefer Perfekt over Präteritum in spoken language. However Perfekt just sounds a bit weird for sein and haben because it duplicates the same words. In bin ...


6

Laut Regel 72 werden als Substantive gebrauchte Adjektive und Partizipien in der Regel großgeschrieben. Hier ein Ausschnitt mit Beispielen: Regel 72: Als Substantive gebrauchte Adjektive und Partizipien werden in der Regel großgeschrieben. das Gute, die Angesprochene, Altes und Neues; und Ähnliches (Abk. u. Ä.), wir haben Folgendes/das ...


6

In your context "werden" is a passive operation (Vorgangspassiv), where something is happing and "sein" is a passive state (Zustandspassiv), where something just is. "Verabredet sein" is a state, you are 'verabredet' "Überholt werden" is an operation, you are being 'überholt'


6

The sentence can be derived like this, by adding one verb at a time: Die Alarmglocken schrillen auf. Das läßt die Alarmglocken aufschrillen. (lassen + Infinitiv; "kausativ") Das muß die Alarmglocken aufschrillen lassen. (müssen + Infinitiv) Das hätte die Alarmglocken aufschrillen lassen müssen. (haben + Ersatzinfinitiv) In the perfect, modal verbs ...


6

The difference between strong (past participle with ‑en) and weak (past participle with ‑t) verbs is that the former constitute a relatively small, closed class whereas the number of the latter is increasing. This is because new verbs inflect weakly: gemanagt, gebloggt, gedopt, gebootet, getwittert. The overwhelming majority of weak verbs inflect completely ...


6

Hubert Schölnast has explained why the weird phrase "verantwortetes Hohnlachen" should be regarded as an idiosyncrasy of the author. Anyway, the verb veranworten also has another connotation than "responsible for". This may be outdated nowadays, but perhaps it was not when the author wrote his text (or the author had a fondness for old-...


5

Usage of tenses in English and German is different, so while the English present perfect tense and the German Perfekt are formed in a very similar manner, you should not equate them. Generally, the German Perfekt and Präteritum (or whatever you like to call them) express the same thing, using one or the other does not express a difference in meaning. So ...


5

erlernen is an interesting derivation of lernen - or better a "specification". While lernen can be used to express learning pretty much anything, erlernen is almost exclusively used with regard to learning a skill or job and thus also implies a certain level of complexity of the subject that has been learned. (The term x-handwerk is also used very ...


5

Generally speaking: the "Partizip 1" forms "anstrengend" / "blondlockend" assume that the respective subject "Woche" / "Mädchen" causes a certain effect or exhibits a certain activity. But this is true only for the case of "anstrengende Wochen", it doesn't apply in the latter case. Instead, having blond, curly hair is simply a state. It may be true if you ...


5

There is actually a difference in meaning between the similar-looking phrases: Im Gürtel hatte er ein Messer und zwei Pistolen stecken. In den Gürtel hatte er ein Messer und zwei Pistolen gesteckt. Im Gürtel hat er ein Messer und zwei Pistolen stecken. In den Gürtel hat er ein Messer und zwei Pistolen gesteckt. The different cases of Gürtel give a first ...


5

In solchen Fällen darf man das Hilfsverb einfach weglassen, das Partizip steht dann alleine da (im Prinzip als Adjektiv): Ein Unfall hat stattgefunden -> Der stattgefundene Unfall hat uns erschreckt. Ein Unfall ist passiert -> Der passierte Unfall hat uns erschreckt. Ob das guter Stil ist oder nicht, kann man diskutieren - Es hört sich für mich ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible