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10 votes
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Wie viele Vokale gibt es im Deutschen?

Ich wage den Versuch einer Antwort für Monophthonge, und beziehe mich ausschließlich auf Phoneme. Ich verwende den Begriff Gespanntheit für das Merkmal, das einen Vokal von seinem „relativ offenerem ...
phipsgabler's user avatar
  • 5,317
10 votes

Why is the German "qu" pronounced as "kv"?

Why do you think it's an oddity? The sound [w] (as in the English words "wind" [wɪnd] or "weep" [wiːp]) does not exist in German language. The most similar sound that exists in German is [v]. And in ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

Should the vowel also become a bit more open before consonant cluster by conjugation?

The answer is no. This may seem tricky to you because in words as der Rest, die Pest, das Fest there is indeed an ɛ. BUT, as a basic rule, pronounciation of vowels in stems is stable in German, and ...
Janka's user avatar
  • 61.4k
8 votes

How can I distinguish between close and close-mid long vowels more easily?

Well, you are learning a language that has at least 30 different spoken vowels, if you count long and short vowels separately and also stressed and unstressed vowels separately. (See this question). ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
8 votes
Accepted

Warum das 'e' manchmal wie 'i' klingt

Das tut es nicht -- zumindest in keinem mir bekannten Dialekt. Allerdings handelt es hier nicht um zwei gleiche "e". Dem Muttersprachler meist unbekannt, hat das Deutsche, seinen fünf (oder ...
phipsgabler's user avatar
  • 5,317
7 votes
Accepted

Which common mistakes do Spanish native speakers studying German make?

Here are some ones from my own experience: The word order is at times very confusing. For example, in Spanish, we might say, "yo no estoy haciendo eso", while in German one would say "Ich mache das ...
Beginning_Math's user avatar
7 votes

Does German distinguish between /t͡s/ and /ts/?

[t͡s] is one doubly articulated consonant. [ts] are two separate articulated consonants. When the sounds [t] and [s] appear inside the same syllable, they are always pronounced as [t͡s], no matter if ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
7 votes

What is the origin of "depperter"

In the Bavarian language/dialect there are many adjectives, that end in -ert: schlampert = schlampig (sloppy) hatschert = hinkend (limping), von hatschen = schwerfällig gehen oder eine lange Strecke ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
6 votes

How to remember umlauts? (ö and ü)

What is your mother tongue? In same cases this can explain certain difficulties. There is a path from pronounciation to writing it, but if you don't have access to the right pronounciation or you ...
Javatasse's user avatar
  • 1,655
5 votes

Which vowels can be reduced to schwas in informal German?

German has two different schwa sounds. The e-Schwa [ə] (or simply Schwa) appears in reduction syllables with -e or -en ending. In addition, this e-Schwa is often reduced to nothing in syllables with -...
Janka's user avatar
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5 votes
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How are the rules of phonetics/pronunciation named in standard german?

An integral part of phonetics (Phonetik in German) is research not only on rules of the quality but also on rules for the quantity of a vowel. The German term for this would be Vokalquantität or ...
Takkat's user avatar
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5 votes
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Pronunciation of consonants at a word-border

When /t/ and /z/ meet, they are pronounced as [ts], when /z/ and /z/ meet, they are pronounced as [sː] (a long [s]). In northern German varieties lenis obstruents such as /z/ become voiced when ...
mach's user avatar
  • 7,257
5 votes

What is "Stotterlaut" in the phonetics?

Stotterlaut itself is the sound you make when you stutter (literally stutter noise). This article mentions Nun ist d nicht nur Verschluß-, Dental-Laut, sondern wie die Erfahrung ergibt, bei häufiger ...
infinitezero's user avatar
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4 votes
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How to remember umlauts? (ö and ü)

It's grundsätzlich yet gründlich. So, your confusion is basically about the tonal change in regard to word class? Remember all but the shortest German words follow the same pattern: ([prefix(es)] –...
Janka's user avatar
  • 61.4k
4 votes

How to remember umlauts? (ö and ü)

German native speakers do not think about umlauts as variations of other vowels. They think of them as distinct letters. The German alphabet doesn't have 26 letters like the English alphabet. It has ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
4 votes
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Sounds change flavour depending on neighbours

This is what's called coarticulation: sounds are influenced by the surrounding sounds. When you say nicht Gräfinger, the /t/ is unvoiced, but the following /g/ is voiced. Your vocal tract cannot ...
Oliver Mason's user avatar
  • 1,148
4 votes

Is there a rule for realizing a-schwa before vowels as [r] at words boundaries?

Phonetics/Phonology is not really my area of research, so someone else may be better equipped to respond, but it appears to me that this has to do with the boundaries of the (phonetic) syllables. If ...
johnl's user avatar
  • 7,718
4 votes

reduction of "das" to "s"

I suspect that the former case, where the article is attached to a preceding verb («ich hab’s Problem gelöst», «er fährt’s Auto in die Garage») is more common than the latter case, where the article ...
mach's user avatar
  • 7,257
4 votes

Pronunciation of Ernst Robert Curtius

The same pronunciation also applies to the chemist Curtius and all others with the same surname. In words of Latin origin that end in -tium, -tius, -tion, -tial, -tiell and others with the general ...
Jan's user avatar
  • 38.7k
4 votes

Which is the most used version of German?

Short answer: The most used version of German is: Deutsches Standarddeutsch (German standard German) This is also the version you will learn when you learn German as a foreign language. In more ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How do you write Pelé phonetically in German?

The German Wikipedia article states that the name is pronounced [peˈlɛ], but in Germany, I have always heard [pe:ˈle:], like for example in this video. I don't speak Portuguese and I don't know how ...
HalvarF's user avatar
  • 27.2k
3 votes

Should I vocalize non-prevocalic /R/ after short vowels?

In German the phones [r], [ʀ] and [ʁ] are free allophones of the phoneme /r/. phone A phone is a distinct sound, i.e. noticeable different from other sounds, that is used to speak. phoneme An ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Phonetischer Unterschied zwischen "sosehr" and "so sehr"

Es gibt keinen Unterschied in der Aussprache zwischen der Konjunktion sosehr und der adverbialen Wendung so sehr. Es kann natürlich vorkommen, dass der Betonung halber ein Vokal in der adverbialen ...
Em1's user avatar
  • 38.6k
3 votes

Liste deutscher Minimalpaare

Dies ist eine Community-Wiki-Antwort. Das heißt, dass sie jeder editieren darf (und auch ausdrücklich aufgefordert ist das zu tun) um diese Antwort zu erweitern. betonte und unbetonte Vokale und ...
3 votes

Wie viele Vokale gibt es im Deutschen?

Meine Erfahrung vor allem beim Deutsch-Unterricht für Geflüchtete, speziell aus arabisch-sprechenden Ländern, sagt mir: Es gibt im Deutschen 15 Vokal-Phoneme. Deutsch - die Sprache mit 15 Vokalen! ...
Niels Clasen's user avatar
3 votes

How is sentence stress in German different than in English?

I disagree with most items in Jankas list. You don't stress words, you stress syllables. I think more correct are: ein schönes Auto ein schönes rotes Auto ein wirklich schönes rotes Auto ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
3 votes

Sounds change flavour depending on neighbours

You might be interested to know how a non-native speaker like me hears your examples: Sounds completely normal to me according to standard pronunciation maybe by someone from Bavaria or Austria. I ...
Abdullah's user avatar
  • 1,319
3 votes

Sounds change flavour depending on neighbours

I think your hearing is correct. The voice file has an additional i-like sound that doesn't belong there. The speaker makes an unnatural stop between "Ahorn" and "Straße" and even seems to breathe in. ...
Volker Landgraf's user avatar
3 votes

Rounding of /ɪ/ ending up with an /ʏ/ sound?

Your ears are ok. There are some regions in Germany where people speak [ʏ] (»ü«) where they should speak [ɪ] (»i«). In this regions words like »Tisch« or »Fisch« are spoken like »Tüsch« or »Füsch«, ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
3 votes

Aus Klängen zusammengesetzte Wörter

Ich kenne keine spezielle Bezeichnung für solche Wörter. Im Französischen gibt es ein verbreitetes Wortspiel, das auf ihnen beruht, nämlich die Charade. Im Deutschen ist dieses Wortspiel unbekannt, ...
mach's user avatar
  • 7,257

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