New answers tagged

0

Diese Antwort ist nur eine Vermutung! Betrachten wir zunächst einmal Wendungen wie: Bis morgen! Bis Montag! Bis nächstes Jahr! Hier geht der Sprecher davon aus, dass morgen, Montag, nächstes Jahr, etc. der Zeitpunkt ist, an dem man sich wiedersieht. Allerdings könnte ein solcher Zeitpunkt auch unbestimmte Tage in der Zukunft bezeichnen. Sobald die Tage ...


1

Ich kenne die Formulierung schon aus meiner Schulzeit in den 80ern (in Berlin), die Bedeutung ist eben bis an irgendeinem der nächsten Tage, also ungefähr alles zwischen morgen und in 1 bis 2 Wochen, wenn man nicht genau weiß, wann man sich wiedersehen wird. Als seltenere Variante im Sinne von bis in ein paar Stunden ist mir auch noch Bis die Kürze! ...


2

The expression is "Verreck(e), Du Aas". "Verrecken" means "to die miserably". "Aas", literally "carrion", "dead animal body", is a very traditional and a bit old-fashioned insult, primarly for a dishonorable, malicious, perfidious person. Combining both, "Verreck(e), Du Aas" is a curse. Something like "Die, Motherfucker". If you read it in early 20th ...


0

As the previous answers suggest, most likely you heard "Verrecke, du Aas". Using "Aas" in such a context has the same meaning as in French (see petitrien's comment). There are quite a number of well-known phrases like "Du freches Aas" or "Du faules Aas". Look at https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/Aas - Bedeutungen [4]. Also see https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Aas....


2

To me, it's clearly a calque from the French, Crève, charogne!, with Crève! being the imperative of crever, to die (of animals) and charogne, Aas. Charogne can easily be used figuratively to refer to humans. Baudelaire famously entitled one of his pieces A une charogne. It's very disparaging. The same is true for charognard, Aasfresser, to refer to people ...


1

My guess for the second part would be that you misheard the word "Arsch" as in "verreck du Arsch" which means "kick the bucket, asshole" instead of "Ass". By the way, the past tense of eat is "aß", not "ass".


3

I'm sure it's not good! Yes, that's not good. It's hate speech. I looked up verrecken and know that is a slang word for die. Yes, that's also correct. It's imperative for die. I must have misunderstood "Ass" - I only know it to be the past tense of eat or an Ace playing card. What is the actual expression? The actual expression is most probably Aas ...


3

Quote: [...] It seems like „Verschweißter Salat” just means „Fertigsalat” [...] Verschweißen ≠ einschweißen Let's clarify terms first: verschweißen: to fuse something by welding einschweißen: to wrap something into foil and seal the foil by welding From this, it follows that the phrase verschweißter Salat is sloppy use of language, for not the salad ...


1

Normally (see my comments in 5, though) you would use the adjective eingeschweißt (shrink-wrapped) to indicate that a product is packed in plastic. This comes from the verb schweißen which translates into to weld. einschweißen is a somewhat metaphorical extension of the verb, I guess it stems from the fact, that plastic packages have (or at least used to ...


4

"Komm' schon" would probably be the more fitting translation for "come on" for encouragement or prodding. "Komm' jetzt" is more like "Come now". An impatient mother might say that to her dawdling child. "Komm' jetzt" on its own is quite harsh, like an order or a command. You might want to think about whether you get to order the recipient around or not ;) ...


Top 50 recent answers are included