19

Dich trügt dein Sprachgefühl. Das, was du als Zustandspassiv anzusehen scheinst, ist in Wirklichkeit ein Plusquamperfekt, also die Vorvergangenheit. Der Tod […] hat große Trauer ausgelöst (1. Vergangenheitsstufe) Der SPD-Politiker war gestern gestorben. (2. Vergangenheitsstufe) Die 2. Vergangenheitsstufe muss logisch und faktisch vor der ersten gewesen ...


10

Es war etwas gegeben is past passive voice. Present: Es gibt Past: Es gab Present perfect: Es hat gegeben Pluperfect: Es hatte gegeben Es hatte etwas gegeben is pluperfect.


8

You are right that the past participle of geben is gegeben, but the auxiliary verb to use with it is not sein, it is haben. Therefore the correct form is: Es hatte gegeben.


7

This use of Plusquamperfekt is wrong in standard German but very common in some regions. I observed it especially in Saarland, but it may not be the only one. As you said yourself: Plusquamperfekt is only to be used if the Referencepoint is in the past (so you're already talking in past tense) and you want to go even further back (kind of like inception ;...


6

The start of the passage uses Indikativ Präteritum. Die Dursleys besaßen alles, was sie wollten, doch sie hatten auch ein Geheimnis, und dass es jemand aufdecken könnte, war ihre größte Sorge. It then switches to Konjunktiv II. Einfach unerträglich wäre es, wenn die Sache mit den Potters herauskommen würde. This is simply indirect speech without an ...


5

This is one of the "catalog use cases" of Plusquamperfekt (past perfect) in German, which is very rarely used in the contemporary language. Plusquamperfekt, as you rightly say, is used for actions (and states) that have already happened or were apparent before the perfect. As all of your story is in perfect, it is used to express that the horses have been ...


5

Der Sprecher hat hier einen Fehler gemacht, der jedoch recht üblich ist. Sehr typisch ist es in Verbindung mit sein, wie du selbst erwähnst. Wo warst du gestern gewesen? Der Satz kann richtig sein, wenn eine Referenz zu einem Zeitpunkt in der Vergangenheit vorliegt. Der Zeitpunkt (also "gestern") gehört übrigens strikt genommen in den Teil des Satzes, ...


4

With most verbs one uses haben as auxiliary verb to form the perfect (or Plusquamperfekt), but with some, sein must be used. Verbs of movement generally use sein for the perfect. This includes kommen and its derivatives, including ankommen. Because of this, Sie waren angekommen is correct, and Sie hatten angekommen is wrong.


4

I am actually translating this text now. I think it is written this exact way because of alliteration. Do you notice the words that begin with the "g" sound? gewesen, ganz, geblänkt, gespiegelt.” In English I would write it as: "ach! great and glorious they were! they glisened and gleamed." There is alliteration in other areas of the also. clothes, …could no ...


3

In German, praeteritum is used to retell the current events in a story. See this explanation from Wikipedia: In literarischen Texten, insbesondere Romanen, ist das verwendete Erzähltempus das Präteritum, das hier jedoch die Gegenwart innerhalb der erzählten Geschichte ausdrückt. In der Erzählung gibt es kein Perfekt – es sei denn, der Roman ist im ...


3

I totally agree with @Kristina's answer, but want to add my guess about why Germans use the Plusquamperfekt so often wrong. Früher war er Arbeiter gewesen. Plusquamperfekt, which is wrong in this case, as the reference point is not in the past. Früher war er Arbeiter Präteritum, which is better and in my opinion the correct tense in this example, as ...


3

The standard reading is that German has two passive forms and 3 past tenses. Here they are: Die Käse wird geschnitten. (focus on process) Der Käse ist geschnitten. (focus on result) Ich habe den Käse geschnitten. Ich schnitt den Käse. Ich hatte den Käse geschnitten. If we combine that we get 6 options. Simple math. 1) Der Käse ist geschnitten ...


3

Ich weiß nicht genau, wie die Aufgabenstellung aussieht, aber ich nehme an, dass in der intendierten Lösung die Zeiten vertauscht sein sollen (Präteritum im Nebensatz, Plusquamperfekt im Hauptsatz): Bevor ich das Haus verließ, hatte ich den Computer ausgeschaltet. Plusquamperfekt in beiden Teilsätzen wäre auch möglich, aber nur dann, wenn schon das ...


2

Beide Sätze sind grammatisch richtig. Welchen der beiden Sätze ein deutscher Sprecher wählen würde, hängt davon ab, was als nächstes passiert und in welchem zeitlichen Abstand sich die Ereignisse abspielen. Der erste Satz wäre auf Englisch eher 'they told me ... it was rejected'. Der zweite Satz kommt 'had been rejected' näher, doch im Deutschen wird ...


2

Your assumption, that you "cannot write" the version using pluperfect is wrong. Both versions are totally valid and can be found in German language. Usually we just don't use the "complicated" form with pluperfect in cases where the timing is totally clear without it: In your example of course you had finished playing soccer, before you took a shower -> ...


2

Let me give you the way I'd express your sentences in informal, spoken German (not a word-by-word translation, but a natural way to convey the meaning). The translation might depend on the context, so I'll give my interpretation as well. I had left the cafe by the time you left your house. Als du aus dem Haus gingst, hatte ich das Café schon verlassen. ...


2

I had left the cafe by the time you left your house. Two times perfect conveys the same time: Ich habe das Cafe zu der/jener Zeit verlassen als/zu der du dein Haus verlassen hast. Plusquamperfect should be accompanied by a marker as schon or bereits: Ich hatte das Cafe zu der/jener Zeit schon verlassen als/zu der du dein Haus verlassen hast. The reason ...


2

Contradicting what Crusha K. Rool said I would suppose there is indeed a correct way to combine Plusquamperfect (i.e. something happened before something else in the past) and Conjunctive I (for indirect speech). Er sagt, dass alle Gäste zur Tatzeit bereits gegangen gewesen seien. One may argue that this is rarey used, both in oral and written ...


2

Plusquamperfekt, Indikativ: Gabi sah mir gestern Abend tief in die Augen, aber davor hatte ich ziemlich viel Bier getrunken, daher bemerkte ich es nicht. Gabi looked deeply into my eyes yesterday evening, but before that I had drunk a lot of beer, so I did not notice it. You use Plusquamperfekt only for actions, that happened before another event in the ...


2

Consecutio temporum was part of the German gramma and therefore is kept as such by some people. (See its German wikipedia entry for that.) In the usual language (in spoken rather than written), it can be used but is neither required nor expected. So, as long as you don't use a relatively future tense for the relatively past tense, it's more or less up to you,...


1

Switching tenses like this when they obviously aren't applicable is a literary device; it expresses excitement or even incoherence. For instance, you might be telling a story in the past tense, and at a riveting development you switch to the present tense to add immediacy to the effect you're having. This passage simply makes more extensive use of that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible