Skip to main content
15 votes
Accepted

How to describe the location (North, South, East and West) of a country/city with respect to another country/city

liegt – ist German has a couple of verbs that do not describe an action, but the kind of being located somewhere. English has such verbs too, but in English they are mainly used to describe positions ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Finites Verb vor dem doppelten Infinitv

Prinzipiell gilt absteigende Reihenfolge. laut einer Studie, die demnächst veröffentlicht3 werden2 soll1 Das finite Verb kann vorangestellt werden. Gewünscht waren Fälle, in denen ein Modalverb ...
David Vogt's user avatar
  • 26.5k
5 votes

Stress position in German sentences

These are indeed joint questions and to be answered interleavingly. Information structure As I have commented, it is not really that "at the end, important (new) information should be placed"...
phipsgabler's user avatar
  • 5,317
5 votes

How to describe the location (North, South, East and West) of a country/city with respect to another country/city

In German, things are generally not described as just "being" at a location, but instead are described as "doing" something there. This is often "lying" - "liegen&...
RDBury's user avatar
  • 11.7k
5 votes
Accepted

Why is "zur Schule" inside the verbal bracket here?

Your sentence shows the Sonderregel of the ordering of infinitive verbs. When the second infinitive verb is reigned by a modal verb, in your case wollen, the auxiliary haben is placed directly to the ...
EagleFliesBanana's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

"auf den" or "auf dem" Weg?

Typically, a dative indicates location, while an accusative indicates direction. This has been discussed in many a question on this site ;) But this case is actually a bit tricky, therefore I think it ...
Henning Kockerbeck's user avatar
3 votes

How to describe the location (North, South, East and West) of a country/city with respect to another country/city

I would like to see the genitive here: ‹Die Stadt› liegt im Süden Deutschlands, if it is a German town. Südlich von would indicate that it is south outside of Germany, in Switzerland, Austria or Italy....
Matthias Ronge's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What is the correct position of würde in this sentence?

Both variants are correct. No. 1 with 'würde' leading has the upside that it eases comprehension, plus it sounds a bit more poetic at least to my ears. Note however that there is a referrence problem ...
starrin's user avatar
  • 223
3 votes
Accepted

Können zwei verschiedene adverbiale Bestimmungen an der ersten Position eines Hauptsatzes gestellt werden?

Kurz nach dem Abitur ist eine einzige adverbiale Bestimmung der Zeit, nicht zwei. Das ergibt sich daraus, dass kurz auf nach dem Abitur bezogen ist. Ohne nach dem Abitur hätte kurz einen völlig ...
RHa's user avatar
  • 16k
2 votes
Accepted

Why is the verb (stehen) in this position?

This is a contraction of two sentences: Wellness ist kein gesetzlich geschützter Begriff. Wellness steht jedoch für ein ganzheitliches Gesundheitskonzept, ... Both sentences share the same subject (»...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Verneinung vor einer modalen Angabe

Es kommt ganz einfach darauf an, was verneint werden soll, und daraus ergibt sich die Position der Verneinung. Ich sehe nicht gerne fern - Hier wird der gesamte Satz verneint, das Prädikat und die ...
tofro's user avatar
  • 65k
1 vote

Where can I find the rule on position of ‘nicht’ in clauses after ‘daß’ using compound past tense?

RDBury already mentioned it in his answer: »daß« is wrong since 1996. Correct is »dass« Next error: The subordinating conjunction »dass« initiates a subordinating clause that needs to be separated ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
1 vote

Where can I find the rule on position of ‘nicht’ in clauses after ‘daß’ using compound past tense?

First a couple nitpicks: German usually prefers to put a comma between clauses even if none is required in English, so it would be customary to put a comma between leid and daß in your examples. Also, ...
RDBury's user avatar
  • 11.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Weird position of verb in sentence

Just today I wrote an answer to another question, that also deals with sentence structures. Please read this other answer for more details. So, I can make it short here. The part that I marked bold ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible