30 votes

Confusion with seinem and two masculine nouns in the same sentence

Yes, the sentence indeed is ambiguous, but no, this is not an issue at all. In fact, most sentences in most languages are in (partly) ambiguous. Our brains just automatically resolve most of these ...
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  • 3,012
25 votes
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The difference between "mein" and "meine"

In German, possessive pronouns adjust themselves according to the noun they are referring to. In your example, you have 'Hemden', which is plural and neutral in gender ('Das Hemd'). This changes 'Mein'...
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  • 752
21 votes
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Confusion with seinem and two masculine nouns in the same sentence

You're right, both can be meant, son or plaster. Use »dessen« to remove the ambiguity. Plötzlich wollte mein Sohn aber doch den Gips vor dessen Untergang bewahren. Now it's clear that »dessen« ...
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  • 15k
16 votes
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"Unserer" oder "Unser" als eigenständiges Subjekt

Richtig ist m.E. nur „Unserer“. „Unser“ ist ein Possessivpronomen (Grundform mask. sing.: „mein“). Es kann entweder als Possessivartikel vor einem Nomen stehen: „Unser Fernseher funktioniert nicht ...
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  • 13.2k
15 votes

Is "ein Herz wie das meine" an antiquated or colloquial use of the possesive pronoun?

No. It's perfectly right. You are also right supposing that the case is accusative and the gender neuter. You are wrong, however, using meinem (is dative). In the Wiktionary table, cf. Nicht-...
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  • 30.4k
12 votes
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"Deine Fotos" gegen "Fotos von dir"

Wenn man beide Beschreibungen sieht, dann ist es durchaus möglich, sie zu differenzieren: "Deine Fotos": Die Fotos, die du selber aufgenommen (und hochgeladen) hast. "Fotos von dir": Die Fotos, die ...
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  • 512
12 votes
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The use of "-en" in a specific phrase

First of all: to figure out the meaning by using translation apps, you need to take care of right spelling. In German there is a big difference between befehlen and Befehlen. The former is a verb. The ...
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  • 7,395
11 votes

Grammatikalische Korrektheit von »was ich von der eurigen Arbeitsstelle erwarte«

Ich rate dringend davon ab, von der eurigen Arbeitsstelle irgendwo und speziell in einem aktuellen Bewerbungsschreiben zu verwenden. Eurig wird als Fürwort verwendet, nicht adjektivisch: Wir haben ...
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9 votes
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“Das ist sein Pass.“ Is this sentence right?

Because it's nominative, not accusative. Properly speaking it's a predicative nominative. It's part of the predicate but complements the subject. [Subject] [Predicate] {pronoun} {copular verb} {noun ...
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  • 38.4k
8 votes
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Why would the pronouns in this sentence have different suffixes?

In English you can say: Is that your thigh or my thigh? Is that your thigh or mine? Is that yours or mine? And you translate those sentences into German this way: Ist das dein ...
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8 votes
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Why is it "für ihren Bruder" but not "für ihr Bruder"?

Short answer: für asks for the accusative case, Bruder is singular masculine, so one has to use ihren there, because this is the accusative masculine singular inflection of ihr. Additional comments: ...
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8 votes
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Masculine possessive adjectives ending in nominative

The possessive pronouns (mein, dein, sein, ...) stay the same if followed by a masculine noun, not necessarily directly followed. mein Hund mein schöner Hund mein schneller, schöner, toller Hund If ...
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  • 16.4k
8 votes
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“Wir kaufen ein Geschenk für unsere Tante.” – why “unsere”?

The preposition für requires the Akkusativ. See here: Source Thus the correct answer is indeed für unsere Tante.
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  • 16.4k
7 votes
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When to use sein or ihr?

Its the same as in English: The pronoun refers to the sentences subject, which is male: Walter hat gerade Maria geheiratet. Er (Walter) liebt seine (eigene) Frau sehr. Walter just has ...
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7 votes

Zweideutige Possessivpronomen?

Es hängt im Beispielsatz nur am Komman, dass "der Dieb" ein Einschub ist und nicht eine dritte Person, deshalb ist die Ausgangssituation bei flüchtigem Lesen schon nicht ideal. Ich ignoriere jetzt ...
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  • 24.8k
7 votes
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Warum heißt es „ihrer“ und nicht „ihren“?

The sentence is parsed this way: "in einer (Dativ, singular) ihrer (Genitiv, plural) Familien". In English it would be "in one of their (or "of her"!) families". Note that "in einer Ihrer (...
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  • 4,598
7 votes
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Why "meinem" is used in "Er glaubt meinem Kind"?

From Wiktionary: [3] »jemandem glauben« (Dativ): sich auf jemanden vertrauensvoll verlassen The verb glauben can take both an accusative and dative object. The something you believe is accusative, ...
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  • 38.4k
7 votes

Is "ein Herz wie das meine" an antiquated or colloquial use of the possesive pronoun?

This use is as much antiquated as it is lyrical. It definitively is not colloquial. Some may use that occasionally but its by far not the norm.
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7 votes
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Diese Leiche und seine Umstände

The word “seine” refers to “ihr Tod”, and “Tod” is masculine. Replacing “seine” the sentence would become Und die Umstände ihres Todes sind so schön mysteriös.
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  • 19.1k
6 votes
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Why is it "in meinem Herzen"?

Herzen is not only the plural (in all cases), but the dative singular form, too. It belongs to a group of nouns called “weak”; see, e.g., German for English speakers or canoonet.
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  • 19.5k
6 votes
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Where to use or omit possessive adjectives in German vs. English

I am not completely sure about this but the rule seems to be that the dative is used instead of the possessive if the possession is inalienable. There is a Wikipedia article about this: https://en....
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  • 13.4k
6 votes

Do I need to repeat the possessive pronoun for a second substantive?

As far as I know, there is no grammatical rule saying that there has to be a possessive pronoun before each element in such a kind of enumeration. I rather consider it a convention, though it does ...
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  • 169
6 votes
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Do I need to repeat the possessive pronoun for a second substantive?

It is actually important to have the possessive pronoun in front of each word to emphasize that the roles are applying to two different persons. Usually that would be clear from the number of the verb,...
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6 votes

One adjective for two singular nouns (same gender)

Your second alternative doesn't work in German unfortunately, although it would seem logical. The attributes have to be congruent with the nearest noun. So it has to be mit ihrer üblichen Schönheit ...
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  • 16.9k
5 votes
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Understanding "aber des einen seins war blind"

Your reading A seems to be correct (I must, however, admit I don't really understand your reading B) Des einen seins can be ripped apart to "Das Seine des einen" and is a kind of grammatical ...
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  • 57.3k
5 votes

Is "ein Herz wie das meine" an antiquated or colloquial use of the possesive pronoun?

In your example, meine is a possessive adjective with a regular weak ending -e (just as in das kranke Herz). The more modern form would be ein Herz wie meins with a neuter possessive pronoun (...
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  • 22.2k
5 votes
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How do "attributiv" and "nicht attributiv" work?

Wiktionary is a bit of a mess here. Usually, attributive vs. non-attributive is a distinction made for adjectives. Attributive adjectives accompany a noun and show agreement, non-attributive ...
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  • 22.2k
5 votes
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"Welt, ade, ich bin dein müde" in Bach BWV 158

It is an archaism. The genitive pronoun form used to be «dein» (similarly, also «mein»). The form «deiner» (and «meiner») had become common by the 18th century, while Luther in the 16th century still ...
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  • 6,544
5 votes
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How could sein be the correct possessive in this case?

English "sight" means "seeing something". It is a process. This is "Blick" in German. The eagle has the prey in sight. Der Adler hat die Beute im Blick. But German &...
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4 votes

"Deine Fotos" gegen "Fotos von dir"

Both "deine Fotos" and "Fotos von dir" are ambiguous, but "deine Fotos" is more likely to mean "photos that you made or own", and "Fotos von dir" is more likely to mean "photos having you as the ...
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