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3

Since you already correctly identified Alters as genitive from Alter I need just to supplement the following: DWDS states for wegen: Präposition, auch nachgestellt (preposition, also trailing) and it is this trailing position you seem to stumble over. I admit, that pre-poition is misleading then, but other prepositions share this property; e. g. "...


2

Alters is the Genitiv form of Alter, meaning "age" and von [Noun in Genitiv] wegen means as much as wegen [Noun in Genitiv], i.e. "because of". So, the sentence translates to something like I just want to say, because of [their] age. The sentence seems to be a part of a conversation, for a proper understanding / translation, it is ...


0

The answer might lie in the origin of the prepositions. (1) Proto-Germanic *midi is an isolated development, probably from Proto-Indo-European *me-, with some suffixation, (*meth₂) whence it would be akin to middle (*me-dʰi-o-). "among, amidst" and "with" also shows a compatible semantic similarity. Since *me- does not conform to basic ...


6

What is important to note is that in Middle High German ("Mittelhochdeutsch", MHD), the locative meaning of today's wo was just one of several meanings that the corresponding word had historically. According to Henning's Kleines Mittelhochdeutsches Wörterbuch, MHD had an interrogative pronoun wô, (also attested as wâ and wâr) that translates to ...


1

I guess, the answer is that German is conceptualizing the referents of these adverbs as places in space. My assumption is backed by the following observations. However, the answer of Schmuddi claims that wo has had a broader meaning in Middle High German and just narrowed down to the spatial meaning later, and their claim seems to be correct. Wo? as a ...


0

Lets start by noticing the three words Worum, Worauf and Worüber are both adverbs and compound words. "Wo" by itself is also an adverb, and the first part of the compound. It does not function as a prefix in this case. Lets split the words into their composite parts (the translations are approximate): "Wo + rüber" (over what) the second ...


0

The phrase "Mein Vater hält viel von einem guten Essen" is stylistically not ideal. It should read: "Mein Vater hält viel auf gutes Essen." "halten auf" = to appreciate


2

To shed some more light on this question, we can look at other European languages which have kept more cases than German, particularly Slavic ones like Russian. First, ohne - takes an Accusative because it needs a direct object. This is fairly natural and expected, there is nothing strange about it. Now let's consider why mit (with) might be different and ...


-1

Die fahren nicht hin, gucken lediglich durchs Schaufenster, fahren wieder heim und bestellen dann beim nächsten Online-Händler. Die gehen da auch in das Geschäft hinein! So oder so ist der Ausdruck unterspezifiziert, dabei aber hinreichend genau. Ggf. hat das Geschäft sogar ein Parkhaus, oder weite Grenzen, dann fahren die da wirklich mit der Karre hinein! ...


5

Ja, du hast recht, hier wäre e besser gewesen zu schreiben Frau Müller fährt zu einem Möbelgeschäft. Durch diese Formulierung wird klar, dass das Ziel von Frau Müllers Reise das Möbelgeschäft ist, es wird aber auch klar dass die Fahrt in unmittelbarer Nähe des Geschäfts endet. Wenn im selben Kontext dann vom Möbelkauf die Rede ist, ist auch klar, dass die ...


3

Sie haben recht. Zwischen den Ausdrücken zu einem Möbelgeschäft fahren in ein Möbelgeschäft fahren besteht eigentlich ein inhaltlicher Unterschied. Und sofern Ausdruck 1. gemeint ist, empfinde ich (im norddeutschen Sprachraum aufgewachsen) es zumindest als unüblich, Ausdruck 2. zu verwenden. Die Funktion von Präpositionen besteht ja gerade darin, ...


1

Dativ comes from Latin (casus) dativus (means "given") which was used to denote the receiver. Akkusativ comes from Latin casus accusativus (means "case relating to the indictment") which was used to mark the direct object. A speculation by me is "with" had been understood as "with the given one", and "without"...


1

ohne Even the Old High German variations »anu«, »ano« and »ana« (used in 8th century) were used with accusative case. Some etymologists say, that in even earlier times it also was used together with genitive and dative case, but I couldn't find any sources for it. mit The word »mit« on the other hand seems to be in use with dative case since it exists, which ...


2

There is indication that ohne used to be linked also to the dative (and genitive) case. In the etymology section for the entry ohne at the DWDS, Wolfgang Pfeifer writes: In präpositionaler Verwendung verlangt ohne, das seit dem Ahd. sowohl ‘nicht versehen mit’ als auch ‘außer, ausgenommen’ sein kann, von Anfang an den Akkusativ, doch ist in älterer Zeit ...


-2

There is no logic in grammar as you can clearly see by the dative case in German while almost every similar sentence in English would require accusative. Language is not Mathematics. It's art not science.


1

Let me extend the phrase a bit: to conduct the experiment on the whole population In order to translate it correctly, we must first figure out what the term whole population refers to: in terms of statistics to all individuals of the basic population under consideration → gesamte Population or Grundgesamtheit generally to all inhabitants of a geographic ...


1

Without any context, I'd say "das Experiment an der ganzen Bevölkerung", but this sounds somewhat negative, which might not be intended.


2

You can always use a dative: "Senden Sie Herrn Müller Ihre Bewerbungsunterlagen."


1

Those dates are all in the dative case, but there is a degree of flexibility possible regarding the preposition von / vom < von dem/diesem or an / am < an dem/diesem, because the determiner dem can be forbidden, allowed or mandatory. von heute / (vor)gestern / (über)morgen – relative dates (‘today’, ‘yesterday’, ‘tomorrow’) can never be preceded by ...


1

Der genau Buchtitel lautet nicht »zwischen du und ich«. Den Titel so zu schreiben wäre falsch, denn diese Schreibweise behauptet unmissverständlich: »Alle Wörter werden kleingeschrieben!« was in weiterer Folge bedeutet: »Keines der Wörter ist ein Substantiv!« Und genau das ist falsch. Die Groß-/Kleinschreibung sollte man in der deutschen Sprache sehr ernst ...


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