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1

If you are going somewhere like a hospital often, i would think that you are literally going inside, and with another person... I get the sense from it like, you or she is ill or visiting someone there. That's why, in this context, i would use "ins". Additional to the translation: Aus diesem Grund muss ich oft mit ihr ins Krankenhaus (gehen). But ...


1

First, keep in mind that there's no direct correspondence between prepositions; you have to look at the exact meaning and figure out which preposition is the best match. (This is true of most words in fact, but prepositions are often particularly tricky in this respect.) German allows you to drop the main verb when there is a modal verb (such as müssen) and ...


3

If you want to translate your given sentence word by word, it would be something like this: Aus diesem Grund, muss ich mit ihr das Krankenhaus oft besuchen. If you visit something, you don't go into (ins) or to (zu/zum) something. You just visit it. For example visiting a graveyard, or a friend. But if you go to the hospital, you would say Ich gehe zum ...


4

mit vs. von The use of mit comes from bedrohen itself, while von comes from the passive voice. It's not an either-or relationship, because they are not mutually exclusive and have different meanings. Let's start with the active voice first. In the simplest case, we have neither mit nor von: Der Räuber bedroht den Kasper. The robber threatens Kasper. (...


3

I am a bit puzzled by your question, because English makes the same distinction: He was threatened with a gun. Er wurde mit einer Waffe bedroht. but He was threatened by Peter. Er wurde von Peter bedroht. The semantic distinction is that the first form states what he was threatened with, whereas the second form states who was doing the threatening. ...


2

"To threaten with" is "bedrohen mit", yes, but this here is simply the normal "von" construction for a passive, independent of the particular verb: They're not threatened with, but by poverty and social exclusion. ("Sinken um" also is "drop by", not "to".)


4

Many prepositions could be used here, e.g. bei, für, zu, während, anlässlich, zwecks, … etc. In every case, they are the head of an adverbiale Bestimmung. The preposition conveys whether the adverbial is final (purpose), temporal or modal (or even something else). So the 'correct' preposition depends on the intended meaning: 'on a mission to orbit the moon' ...


3

Dafür haben (or tragen) die Krankenpfleger in einem Pflegeheim täglich die Verantwortung. is right. See also the examples in DWDS. If you want to have an explanation for the correction, you need to ask the people who told you to use darüber. I don't see any reason and for my native German ears dafür is perfectly fine, darüber sounds strange.


0

Bei ist die einzig korrekte Präposition und sie wird auch deutlich später als in der Bibel verwendet, beispielsweise in Kafkas Amerika : Jetzt blieb keine Hilfe als die Quergasse, und als er gar aus dieser Gasse ganz harmlos beim Namen gerufen wurde – es schien ihm zwar zuerst eine Täuschung zu sein, denn ein Sausen hatte er schon die ganze Zeit lang in den ...


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