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2

For starters, the names of streets, squares, roads etc. are always definite in German, so that's how you can tell that something like nach Königsplatz can't be correct - this is also why it's zum Königsplatz (contraction of zu dem Königsplatz) rather than just zu Königsplatz. There is no direct German equivalent to English "to". Directional ...


1

In general, use nach for larger geographical locations: countries, states, cities. (There are exceptions to this though, for instance use in for countries which use an article.) Since you're talking about a bus, which is presumably going to drop you off somewhere near Königsplatz and not actually "inside", you'd probably use zu. If you were already ...


1

This is correct: Ich möchte Sie um Verständnis für dieses Problem bitten. I would like to ask for your understanding for this problem. Ich möchte Sie ... bitten = I would like to ask (you)1 um Verständnis = for (your)1 understanding für dieses Problem = for this problem 1In German you indicate the person who is asked in an accusative object (ich möchte ...


1

As the other answers have explained, we cannot be sure what the speaker wanted to express - both interpretations are valid. And as RDBury comments, the difference is not that big. Nevertheless I tend to understand it in the sense "more than 4 decades". If somebody wants to say that he has been running / leading the market for approximately 40 years,...


6

"Über" can mean both "for " or "(for) more than ", it's impossible to tell. See meaning II 2 vs. meaning II 3 in DWDS. In spoken language, the two variants are stressed differently. "Über vier Jahrzehnte" in the sense of "for four decades" would be stressed on "vier Jahrzehnte". To say that it was ...


3

Actually, both translations are correct. The point is, what does "über" translate to - it can Translate to during, referring to a certain amount of time. there's no "more than" connotation in there. (You can verify this by testing with a non-amount duration, like "Er führte das Unternehmen über die schwere Zeit des Krieges [hinweg]&...


2

This is similar to this question since in involves a prepositional verb. There are several verbs that want you to specify a direction or a target of some kind, and the way to do that is with auf + accusative. These break the accusative=movement rule of thumb, but they have a mini-pattern of their own. Another example is richten auf + accusative -- "to ...


-2

I would say "Im eher als schöner Sprache geltenden Italienisch" is the only correct declination in this case (In case decination applies here). Maybe due to one of the "Rechtschreibreform" omitting the 'r' is considered correct as well, but to me, it sounds faulty.


1

A helpful rule of thumb is that you tend to refer to persons with personal pronouns ("zu ihr") and to things, actions, concepts etc. with compound adverbs ("dazu"). This implies that the example sentence would be better off using "dazu", and indeed I find that as written it sounds slightly off.


4

Ich höre in dem Youtube-Video klar "Im eher als schöne Sprache geltenden Italienisch ...". Die automatischen Untertitel liegen hier nach meinem Gehör falsch. "Als schönen Sprache" wäre auch nicht richtig, weil die Sprache weiblich ist, dazu könnte "schönen" überhaupt nicht passen, bzw. nur mit einem zusätzlichen Artikel (z.B. ...


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