30

Eigennamen get inflected as well (see Duden, GfdS), which means Ein Haus in der Alten Straße is correct. In written language, people should understand you're referring to the street name "Alte Straße" and not to an old street, as the first letter of the street is always written as a capital letter (see Duden) and the actual name of the street, ...


18

The dragon of classic German literature is "der Lindwurm" who is killed by Siegfried in the Nibelungenlied. Actually Lindwurm is an old word for dragon, but I only know it in reference to medieval sagas (Nibelungensage, Rolandssage). A Lindwurm isn't stupid per se (and as far as I understand, Zmey isn't either), but to call a dragon a "wurm&...


7

I'd like to add something to the other answer, since there's more semantic distinctions to it. Proper nouns enjoy a spectrum here, ranging from the same inflective behaviour as common nouns have to becoming essentially uninflectable quotations used as noun phrases. The criterion is an interaction of whether the noun phrase is grammatically transparent with ...


7

There are a number of famous dragons in German-language literature / mythology, but these usually have 1 or 2 heads. In Japanese monster films, however, there is a three-headed dragon named King Ghidorah, who is at least a little known. The first-person narrator seems to want to mock the dragon. Correspondingly, I would choose another multiheaded mythical ...


6

Both of the named dragons from the Jim Knopf stories could fit quite well: Frau Mahlzahn and Nepomuk, der Halbdrache. I think a large, though not majority percentage of Germans know either the books or the Augsburger Puppenkiste adaptions. Even those may not remember the names. But that could be enough, you just need to write it in a way that won't leave the ...


3

As clarified by Photon, "Zmey Gorynych" is used as a generic name. The dragon says to himself something like Ein Trottel bist du, [generic name] Zmey Gorynych I suggest Ein Dummkopf bist Du, Drache Ein Hohlkopf bist Du, Drache O Du hohlköpfiger Drache Moreover, since the Russian word stands for something like a serpent or a wyrm, one could ...


1

If you read something in the newspaper "Die Zeit" you say: Ich habe es in "die Zeit" gelesen or: Ich habe es in der "Zeit" gelesen. Both are correct, but the latter is perhaps more idiomatic.


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