30

Eigennamen get inflected as well (see Duden, GfdS), which means Ein Haus in der Alten Straße is correct. In written language, people should understand you're referring to the street name "Alte Straße" and not to an old street, as the first letter of the street is always written as a capital letter (see Duden) and the actual name of the street, ...


18

The dragon of classic German literature is "der Lindwurm" who is killed by Siegfried in the Nibelungenlied. Actually Lindwurm is an old word for dragon, but I only know it in reference to medieval sagas (Nibelungensage, Rolandssage). A Lindwurm isn't stupid per se (and as far as I understand, Zmey isn't either), but to call a dragon a "wurm&...


8

Ich bekomme deutlich mehr Treffer für »in den VAE« als für »in der VAE«, aber selbt die Wikipedia-Autoren scheinen sich da nicht einig zu sein. Wenn Du davon ausgehst, dass »die Vereinigten Arabischen Emirate« (im Nominativ Plural) der richtige Name des Landes ist, dann ist in den VAE die einzig richtige Form. Das ist auch die Form die z. B. das Auswärtige ...


7

I'd like to add something to the other answer, since there's more semantic distinctions to it. Proper nouns enjoy a spectrum here, ranging from the same inflective behaviour as common nouns have to becoming essentially uninflectable quotations used as noun phrases. The criterion is an interaction of whether the noun phrase is grammatically transparent with ...


7

There are a number of famous dragons in German-language literature / mythology, but these usually have 1 or 2 heads. In Japanese monster films, however, there is a three-headed dragon named King Ghidorah, who is at least a little known. The first-person narrator seems to want to mock the dragon. Correspondingly, I would choose another multiheaded mythical ...


6

Both of the named dragons from the Jim Knopf stories could fit quite well: Frau Mahlzahn and Nepomuk, der Halbdrache. I think a large, though not majority percentage of Germans know either the books or the Augsburger Puppenkiste adaptions. Even those may not remember the names. But that could be enough, you just need to write it in a way that won't leave the ...


3

As clarified by Photon, "Zmey Gorynych" is used as a generic name. The dragon says to himself something like Ein Trottel bist du, [generic name] Zmey Gorynych I suggest Ein Dummkopf bist Du, Drache Ein Hohlkopf bist Du, Drache O Du hohlköpfiger Drache Moreover, since the Russian word stands for something like a serpent or a wyrm, one could ...


3

It appears to be the same mechanism as in this question for adjectives with a substantive component: If the substantive is separated - by hyphen or apostrophe, latter permitted for proper nouns in § 97 of Rechtschreibregeln - it retains its substantive property of starting with an uppercase letter. While in unseparated form there is no reason for uppercase, ...


3

Shegit has already explained why Weißrussland is not the right translation for Belarus. But there is another explanation as to why you should use Belarus instead of Weißrussland. And is due to its history and national identity. Quoting Sven Gerst (interviewed by ZDF Heute) Das Land war in seiner Geschichte immer Teil größerer Regionalmächte. Spricht man von ...


3

User Olafant found this news at Deutschlandfunk (DLF), dating on 6th August 2020. There it is claimed that "Weißrussland" is in (diplomatic) use since 1991 (= the end of the soviet union) by Germany. And some year later the Auswärtige Amt (foreign affairs) switched to "Belarus" like Switzerland and Austria did already. A news by n-tv adds ...


2

in ↔︎ im The word »im« is a contraction of the preposition »in« and the article »dem«. So, the difference between »in« and »im« is the presence of an article, and this is also the reason why »im« works only in dative case, only in singular, only for masculine and neuter nouns, and only if you talk about a certain thing ("definite" i.e. not about ...


1

If you read something in the newspaper "Die Zeit" you say: Ich habe es in "die Zeit" gelesen or: Ich habe es in der "Zeit" gelesen. Both are correct, but the latter is perhaps more idiomatic.


1

In general, a person who is wealthy enough to make a living without having a paid job or without financial assistance is called a Privatier ([pʁivaˈtjeː). However, this doesn't specify, where the wealth comes from. A bit more specific is the term Rentier ([rɛnˈti̯eː]). This describes someone, who lives off regular payments from capital invested in stocks or ...


1

Zusammengefasst spielen drei Faktoren eine Rolle: Genus (da gibt es schon eine ähnliche Frage zu Ländernamen hier) Numerus (Singular oder Plural) wird der Landesname überhaupt mit Artikel verwendet (das ist die Ausnahme). Zu den meisten Aspekten gibt Deutschtraining Auskunft. Wir habe es bei Emirate mit Neutrum Plural zu tun, und die vielen Treffer aus der ...


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