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würde + Infinitiv Perfekt (Konjunktiv II)

I think these things happen when a bad analysis is explained in a bad way. I doubt whether the würde + past participle + haben/sein («er würde geschlafen haben»/«sie würde gegangen sein») is anything ...
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4 votes

Four questions about "Nicht umsonst nennt man es »klassisch«"

Shouldn't it be "sie" instead of "es"? Yes, you're completely right. Can I use "nicht von ungefähr" instead of "nicht umsonst"? Yes, absolutely, that is a ...
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Passive without a "proper" subject

It's dictated by the sequence of tenses. Since "Als ich mich erkundigte" is Imperfekt (past tense), "wurde mir mitgeteilt" needs to be Imperfekt, too. "Wird mir mitgeteilt&...
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Grammatical structure of this sentence

Your approach is a good one. Let's look at it element by element. You deduce correctly, that the main object is in seinem Buch. Now we add an adjective to 'Buch': in seinem emblematischen Buch Now we ...
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Basic Questions about Tense

A is the the ordinary perfect tense which I'm confident you're already familiar with. B is the special subjunctive (Konjunktiv I) in the past tense. The main difference is that the subjunctive is used ...
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1 vote

Sentence Structure

I begin with #3: Perfect infinitive is a construction from English grammar, not from German grammar. You use it in sentences like »I'm happy to have seen this movie« or »You should have called the ...
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3 votes

Sein and Haben in Perfect

Er hat auf den Mann geschossen. Er is subject and does not undergo a change of state, which explains why haben is used with the perfect. Die Kugel ist aus dem Gewehr geschossen. The bullet is ...
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Is putting "haben"/"hat" like this correct?

The first sentence is perfectly fine. Let us simplify and look at the 2nd part: The tense is Perfect, which is formed by "haben" (or "sein") plus an infintive: Er hat ... lassen. ...
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Do we have to say "Uhr" when we give the time?

giving the time is a very complex topic. It's a matter of where you are in the D-A-CH area. In Austria we mostly use Viertel and Dreiviertel of an hour if you don't want to tell the exact time. If you ...
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-1 votes

Is putting "haben"/"hat" like this correct?

Your phrase in the form: Ich hab mich nur gefragt, warum unser King sich einfach festnehmen lassen hat. sounds colloquial. Correct would be: Ich hab mich gefragt, warum unser König sich einfach ...
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Basic Questions

Tenses I am struggling with the differences between (Präteritum) and (Plusquamperfekt) and (Perfekt) Let us start with this. It has already been said that german and english tenses don't map one-to-...
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2 votes

Is this correct please?

I mean the "jeden Tag" sounds like it's tagged on to the sentence. Like "Ich spiele gerne Rugby" is already a full functioning sentence, so yes you can use the gerne after the verb....
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2 votes

Basic Questions

We're using present perfect, because the moment of passing the exam is in the past and he still has it today. Simple past (preterite) would sound weird because our focus here is on the situation as it ...
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2 votes

Do we have to say "Uhr" when we give the time?

You seem to be asking two different questions, so I'll try to answer both of them. Regarding "Uhr", there are two different situations: "Es ist drei [Uhr]." With full hours, &...
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Ersatzinfinitiv

Actually both sentences marked with "ex" are wrong, because they lack a "zu": Er hilft ihm, den Wagen zu waschen. The version after the arrow is also wrong, it needs a PPP (...
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1 vote

Ersatzinfinitiv

I'm just going to dump a bunch of iterations here: With "zu" Er hilft ihm, den Wagen zu waschen. Er hat ihm geholfen, den Wagen zu waschen. Er hat ihm den Wagen zu waschen geholfen. (...
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Confused about German tenses

In addition to Emanuel's answer: What might make this a bit harder for English speakers is the fact that in English, "must" is not a normal verb that can be put into perfect tense, and the ...
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2 votes

Confused about German tenses

You pretty much never HAVE to use "habe XYZ müssen". You can always just say "musste XYZ" You're missing the fact that the verb put in past is actually "müssen", not &...
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1 vote

German tenses and equivalents of them

The sentence you quote is "reported speech" ("indirekte Rede") and the Konjunktiv (subjunctive mood) is used to indicate that. Most probably someone said (something to the effect ...
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1 vote
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Effekt von Frageumkehrung: "Sie haben noch Fragen?"

Es stimmt, dass ein reiner Fragesatz Möchten Sie Ihre Nummer ändern? lauten würde. Diese Frage lässt jedoch die Antwort völlig offen. Möchte man ausdrücken, dass man ziemlich sicher ist, dass die ...
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1 vote

Effekt von Frageumkehrung: "Sie haben noch Fragen?"

Beides ist korrekt, die Haltung des Fragenden zur Antwort ist verschieden: Haben Sie noch Fragen? Dies ist neutral und keine Antwortmöglichkeit wird impliziert oder vorausgesetzt. Sie haben noch ...
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2 votes

Zusammengesetztes Prädikat

Ein Prädikat besteht im einfachsten Fall nur aus einem konjugierten Verb. Du gehst. Sie schweigen. Ich bin ein Berliner. Wenn das Prädikat aus mehreren Teilen besteht, gibt es trotzdem genau ein ...
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