59 votes

How bad does it sound in German *not* to separate separable verbs?

There are separable verbs in English, but they don't work exactly like German ones, so I'm going more by similarity of use and the effect of non-separation: *I upsign my daughter for a class. *My ...
Raketenolli's user avatar
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21 votes
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Why is ‘aus’ needed at the end of a sentence? - More generally: why does a seemingly unnecessary preposition appear at the end of a sentence?

In this case, the aus is not a preposition, but a prefix to a trennbares Verb, a dividable/seperable verb. In your example, the english verb to look translates to aussehen which is the verb sehen ...
jera's user avatar
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19 votes
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Why is there a final “ein” in “Ich schlaf mit einem Messer ein”?

German has a feature, that only a very small number of languages have (English doesn't have it): Separable verbs. »Einschlafen« (to fall asleep) is such a separable verb. It is derived from »schlafen« ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
19 votes
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When to use 'angeboten' and when to use 'bot'?

The verb is, in its infinitive form (the form you need to look it up in a dictionary): to offer = anbieten Like in I want to offer you a drink. Ich möchte dir ein Getränk anbieten. The form for ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
16 votes

How bad does it sound in German *not* to separate separable verbs?

Separable verbs correspond to English phrasal verbs, so I imagine getting the order wrong would sound about as bad as getting the order wrong in a phrasal verb. For English, in most cases the sentence ...
RDBury's user avatar
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14 votes
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What is the function of the »mit« in this sentence?

The translation from tatoeba is wrong or at least not 100% what it says. The sentence could have several meanings, the most obvious one would be: I wish I could come along. where mit would be ...
user1583209's user avatar
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12 votes
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Separable verbs: “hängt von … ab” or “hängt ab von …”

This grammar feature is called prepositional phrase in the Nachfeld, and it's not restricted to separable verbs (though it's easier to notice with separable verbs). Basically, when you have a long ...
dirkt's user avatar
  • 6,996
12 votes

Is there an explanation why the verb "aufhören" is derived from the verb "hören"?

Synchronic view (Synchronic meaning: Looking at the language as it is now.) The meanings of particle verbs are in principle independent of their verbal bases. fallen (to fall) – ausfallen (...
David Vogt's user avatar
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12 votes

How bad does it sound in German *not* to separate separable verbs?

how wrong? Would a native understand it? Is it irritating the ears of a native speaker? To what degree? It would sound totally wrong, but we would understand it just fine. It would clearly show that ...
AnoE's user avatar
  • 488
12 votes

How bad does it sound in German *not* to separate separable verbs?

While sounding wrong in 99% of all cases, this style can be validly (though exceptionally) used in what is called Telegrammstil, where you don't split prefixes in order to minimize word count. This ...
phipsgabler's user avatar
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12 votes
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Why has the verb not been separated?

There are actually two different verbs durchlaufen, one separable and one non-separable, both having the same infinite form. The separable verb's meaning is more literal "to run through", ...
Jonathan Scholbach's user avatar
11 votes
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What does the word "ab" mean?

"ab" does not have meaning of its own here. It is a separated part of the word "trägt", i.e. a form of "abtragen" (to clear away, to pay off a debt).
Kilian Foth's user avatar
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10 votes
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Why is it »aus führen« and not »ausführen«?

The verb used is führen, not ausführen In your sentence, aus belongs to von zu Hause aus, describing the place: from home. A rough translation might be She would lead the affairs of state from home. ...
Lykanion's user avatar
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10 votes
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Wie schreibt man trennbare Verben in Imperativsätzen?

The former prefix of separable verbs must always stand at the end of the clause. Examples with the verb: abwaschen Indikativ, Futur I (not separated): Sebastian wird das Geschirr, das während der ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
9 votes
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„Zusammen geführt“ oder „zusammengeführt“?

Die amtlichen deutschen Rechtschreibregeln behandeln zusammengesetzte Verben in den §§ 33 mit 35. Da es sich auf keinen Fall um eine untrennbare Zusammensetzung handelt (»Er führt zusammen« und nicht »...
Jan's user avatar
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9 votes
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Is the verb umfassen separable?

No, in this context (the listing) it is not seperable. Note: in the context of grip (e.g. in climbing) umfassen is seperable, see https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/umfassen Edit: As user unknown pointed ...
npe's user avatar
  • 161
9 votes

Sie liegt ihm ob

Der Duden kennzeichnet die getrennte Form als veraltend oder veraltet. Das entspricht auch meinem Sprachgefühl. Auszug aus obigem Link: Rechtschreibung INFO Worttrennung: ob|lie|gen Beispiele: es ...
Raketenolli's user avatar
  • 2,962
9 votes

Was bedeutet aufsinken in dem Satz unten?

Das Verb lautet nur "sinken" (das Wort "aufsinken" gibt es nicht). Es hat hier nur zwei Präpositionen gleichzeitig: Das Boot sinkt um 100 Meter = Es ist jetzt 100 Meter tiefer als ...
Kilian Foth's user avatar
  • 14.8k
8 votes
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Verbs with separable prefixes in colloquial speech

No, the Verbklammer is not an optional nicety that people tend to omit in casual speech. It really is an essential, deeply ingrained part of learning to speak native German. Even though this seems ...
Kilian Foth's user avatar
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8 votes
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Why does mit not come at the end of a sentence when the verb "mitkommen" is used

Your first guess is the right one: There is no rule that the prefix has to be always at the end of the Sentence. Some other exemples: Er ging in die Welt hinaus. Er ging hinaus in die Welt. Oder: ...
ixolius's user avatar
  • 530
8 votes

Is there an explanation why the verb "aufhören" is derived from the verb "hören"?

hören Like in English hören/hear has common etymologic roots that always meant more than a simple acoustic listening. It is also used widely in the meaning of to follow, to obey, and in German also to ...
Takkat's user avatar
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8 votes
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A genitive complement with a seeming tacit feminine noun

"Seiner" is simply the genitive case of "er". The fact that it looks like a possessive pronoun is irrelevant in this case. (Diachronically there is probably a reason why a very ...
Kilian Foth's user avatar
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7 votes
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What's the meaning of "an" in this sentence?

The verb in the German sentence is anhalten, a so called phrasal verb composed of the preposition an and the actual phrasal verb halten. If the verb gets reordered in the sentence the prepositional ...
A. Grieco's user avatar
7 votes
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Trennbare Verben: er sieht aus wie... oder er sieht wie... aus

There are constructions of varying "weight" in the language, and depending on how "weighty" a sentence part is, an exposition beyond the Verbklammer becomes more or less acceptable....
Kilian Foth's user avatar
  • 14.8k
7 votes

When to use 'angeboten' and when to use 'bot'?

That "offered" means "angeboten" is only half of the truth. "Offered" in English can be the perfect participle, or it can be past tense. The perfect participle of "...
RHa's user avatar
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7 votes
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Unterschied zwischen rufen und anrufen?

The main difference is, that Anrufen always needs another person/object. Most people will use the verb anrufen, in the meaning of to give somebody a call (via telephone), while rufen is used for ...
mtwde's user avatar
  • 14.2k
7 votes

Warum ist "bevorstehen" trennbar?

Das Präfix ist hier "bevor". Die meisten Verben, die mit "bevor" beginnen, haben das Präfix "be", z.B. "bevormunden". Doch das Verb "bevorstehen" ist ...
RDBury's user avatar
  • 11.5k
6 votes

Kann das Präfix eines trennbaren Verbs zusammen mit einem weiteren Satzglied ins Vorfeld gezogen werden?

Soweit mir bekannt ist, gestatten die derzeit geltenden Grammatikregel diese halbe Trennung eines trennbaren Verbes nicht. Mit »halbe Trennung« meine ich, dass nur ein Leerzeichen in das Verb ...
Hubert Schölnast's user avatar
6 votes

Why is ‘aus’ needed at the end of a sentence? - More generally: why does a seemingly unnecessary preposition appear at the end of a sentence?

Yes, it is needed. In effect, the verb "aussehen" is split into "aus" and "sehen", wrapping around the adverb, which is also the reason why you can't simply drop the "aus". You might also want to ...
Thomas's user avatar
  • 1,602

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