58

There are separable verbs in English, but they don't work exactly like German ones, so I'm going more by similarity of use and the effect of non-separation: *I upsign my daughter for a class. *My friend uppicked me at the airport. or *I outfigured the math homework. I think that both your German and my English examples would be understood by most if not ...


22

In this case, the aus is not a preposition, but a prefix to a trennbares Verb, a dividable/seperable verb. In your example, the english verb to look translates to aussehen which is the verb sehen with a prefix aus. In present tense, these verbs are conjugated like this ich sehe nett aus du siehst nett aus er/sie/es sieht nett aus wir sehen nett ...


21

I think it makes more sense to look at it the other way round: The Verb actually is "aufstehen". The separation of the prefix in certain contexts happens because it's a "trennbares Verb" (separable verb). When used in a main clause, the prefix moves to the end of the clause. In a dependent clause it doesn't. Since what you have in your example is a ...


20

I give you two situations: Situation 1: English: You and Peter have been swimming in the ocean. You just came out of the water, but Peter is 30 meters away from you. You want, that Peter comes to you, so you call him. Who do you call? German: Du und Peter wart im Meer schwimmen. Ihr seid gerade aus dem Wasser gekommen, aber Peter ist 30 ...


16

Separable verbs correspond to English phrasal verbs, so I imagine getting the order wrong would sound about as bad as getting the order wrong in a phrasal verb. For English, in most cases the sentence would sound wrong but the meaning would still be clear: "I'm glad you up brought that." But there are cases in both languages where the word order ...


14

The translation from tatoeba is wrong or at least not 100% what it says. The sentence could have several meanings, the most obvious one would be: I wish I could come along. where mit would be short for mitkommen/mitgehen/mitfahren. Another, less obvious meaning could be: I wish I could [do sth] with [using sth]. where the parts in brackets have to ...


13

Try Er verletzt sie mehr als sie ihn. The use of the verbs 'tun' and 'machen' in written language is generally seen as an indicator of being in poor command of the language and occasionally of poor cognitive skills in general. 'Machen' is more acceptable as 'tun'. In oral language, both occur more frequently.


12

This grammar feature is called prepositional phrase in the Nachfeld, and it's not restricted to separable verbs (though it's easier to notice with separable verbs). Basically, when you have a long and complex prepositional phrase, you can put it after the main sentence, and that means it comes after a separable prefix or the infinitive/participle group that ...


12

how wrong? Would a native understand it? Is it irritating the ears of a native speaker? To what degree? It would sound totally wrong, but we would understand it just fine. It would clearly show that you're a non-native speaker. Whether it is irritating depends on whether the listener is generally annoyed with non-natives making errors. I have contact with ...


12

While sounding wrong in 99% of all cases, this style can be validly (though exceptionally) used in what is called Telegrammstil, where you don't split prefixes in order to minimize word count. This isn't really necessary nowadays, but has been carried over into text messages of some older people still having grown up with telegrams, appearently, and sounds ...


11

"ab" does not have meaning of its own here. It is a separated part of the word "trägt", i.e. a form of "abtragen" (to clear away, to pay off a debt).


10

First of all, as it shown in the link given by rogermue or at this page by canoonet.eu, possible candidates for such verbs can be made out by their prefix: Only durch, über, um, unter, wider and wieder can lead to verbs that are both separable and inseparable. Note that both sources list wieder as an always-separable prefix, which is wrong by counter-example:...


10

Duden online gibt hier die Lösung unter der Rubrik Grammatik: unregelmäßiges Verb; erkennt an/(besonders schweizerisch:) anerkennt, erkannte an/(besonders schweizerisch:) anerkannte, hat anerkannt Die zusammengesetzte Form ist demnach also die schweizerische Variante. Es gibt sie schon sehr lange. In Analogie zu auferstehen ist sie wahrscheinlich als ...


10

Das Wort umfahren ist der Infinitiv der beiden folgenden Verben: umfahren (untrennbar) einen anderen Weg fahren als den, auf dem sich ein Hindernis befindet umfahren (trennbar) etwas oder jemanden treffen, während man fährt, sodass dieses etwas oder dieser jemand fällt oder nach unten geht Je nachdem, welche Bedeutung du meinst, musst du das ...


10

Synchronic view (Synchronic meaning: Looking at the language as it is now.) The meanings of particle verbs are in principle independent of their verbal bases. fallen (to fall) – ausfallen (to be cancelled) lehnen (to lean) – ablehnen (to reject) nehmen (to take) – aufnehmen (to record) wenden (to turn over) – aufwenden (to ...


10

The verb used is führen, not ausführen In your sentence, aus belongs to von zu Hause aus, describing the place: from home. A rough translation might be She would lead the affairs of state from home. Compare: I'm working at home: Ich arbeite zu Hause I'm working from home: Ich arbeite von zu Hause aus See e.g. https://www.linguee.com/english-german/search?...


9

Er tut ihr mehr weh als sie ihm. You can just drop the second "tut". "Tun" can be used roughly like "do", but it isn't considered good style and sounds childish.


9

As you can look up at canoo.net, compounds of verbs are separated. But: Verbindungen mit bleiben, lassen an zweiter Stelle können auch zusammengeschrieben werden, wenn sie eine übertragenen[sic] (figürliche) Bedeutung haben. Dies gilt auch für kennen lernen. Until 1996 the only valid spelling was the compound version. In the reform it was decided that ...


9

No, in this context (the listing) it is not seperable. Note: in the context of grip (e.g. in climbing) umfassen is seperable, see https://de.wiktionary.org/wiki/umfassen Edit: As user unknown pointed out: if umfassen is used to describe an activity then it’s seperable. etwas anders anfassen: Er fasste um, da seine Hand begann weh zu tun. He had to change ...


9

Die amtlichen deutschen Rechtschreibregeln behandeln zusammengesetzte Verben in den §§ 33 mit 35. Da es sich auf keinen Fall um eine untrennbare Zusammensetzung handelt (»Er führt zusammen« und nicht »Er zusammenführt«) und da der Verbstamm nicht sein ist, ist § 34 hier relevant. § 34: Partikeln, Adjektive, Substantive oder Verben können als Verbzusatz ...


9

Der Duden kennzeichnet die getrennte Form als veraltend oder veraltet. Das entspricht auch meinem Sprachgefühl. Auszug aus obigem Link: Rechtschreibung INFO Worttrennung: ob|lie|gen Beispiele: es obliegt, oblag mir, es ist mir oblegen; zu obliegen, veraltend auch es liegt, lag mir ob; es hat mir obgelegen; obzuliegen


8

In German you do not have to repeat the verb in the comparison. A correct sentence is: Er tut ihr mehr weh als sie ihm. Since you asked for word order, another correct sentence is: Er tut ihr mehr weh als sie ihm weh tut. It is not possible to omit the second weh in this sentence.


8

Das Präfix unter- gehört zu den Präfixen, die sowohl trennbar als auch nicht trennbar sein können. Dabei kommt es nicht nur auf den Stamm an, mit dem es kombiniert wird, sondern vor allen Dingen auf den Kontext. Beispielsweise umfahren ist mal trennbar (Fahr das Schild nicht um!) und mal nicht (Umfahre das Schild nicht!).1 Bezogen auf das Präfix unter- ist ...


8

Es ist möglich, aber sehr ungewöhnlich; sehr viel ungewöhnlicher als ein Satz wie Gestorben ist er an einem Herzinfarkt, in dem das gestorben stark betont ist, häufig, um einen Kontrast herzustellen: Gestorben ist er an einem Herzinfarkt, aber er hatte auch einen bösartigen Hirntumor. Am ehesten würde man ein abgetrenntes Präfix am Satzanfang verwenden, ...


8

No, the Verbklammer is not an optional nicety that people tend to omit in casual speech. It really is an essential, deeply ingrained part of learning to speak native German. Even though this seems quite weird to native speakers of English, it seems very "normal" to us, and hearing it mishandled sounds very weird to us. (Even though there is a strong tendency ...


8

Your first guess is the right one: There is no rule that the prefix has to be always at the end of the Sentence. Some other exemples: Er ging in die Welt hinaus. Er ging hinaus in die Welt. Oder: Du siehst heute aus wie Herr Soundso Du siehst heute wie Herr Soundso aus EDIT: I intentionally chose two exemples where both possibilities are almost equally ...


8

"Seiner" is simply the genitive case of "er". The fact that it looks like a possessive pronoun is irrelevant in this case. (Diachronically there is probably a reason why a very rare form looks similar to another, more frequent form, but that doesn't affect how language works in the present.)


7

All three examples sound correct to me. You could even say Du siehst heute wie ein Mädchen aus. However you would usually try to keep the connection as close as possible. So the first and second example are "better" than the third or mine above. It might get hard to get the context if the sentence gets longer. For example: Ich füllte das Formular ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible