New answers tagged

2

Although there are a lot of (in)famous examples how this feature of German language can be (ab)used to create sentences that are hard to understand, pragmatically, this is solved by putting the particle close to the verb. Taking the example from tofros answer: Die Koffer waren gepackt, und er reiste, nachdem er seine Mutter und seine Schwestern geküsst und ...


4

This is more a psycholinguistic question than specifically German. Utterances in all languages contain less information than they theoretically could -- redundancy is more important than compression (within certain bounds). Additionally, listeners continuosly predict the continuation of the utterances they here. Syntactically, this phenomenon is known as ...


4

A famous example (from Mark Twain's humorous Essay "The awful German language", definitely a recommended read for anyone learning German): „Die Koffer waren gepackt, und er reiste, nachdem er seine Mutter und seine Schwestern geküsst und noch ein letztes Mal sein angebetetes Gretchen an sich gedrückt hatte, das, in schlichten weißen Musselin ...


0

Hier hilft nur ein gutes Wörterbuch, denn zu allem anderen kommt, dass die Unterscheidung trennbar oder nicht trennbar nicht allein aus den Bestandteilen abzuleiten ist, sondern auch noch zeitlichem Wandel unterliegen kann. So heißt es in Meyers Konversationslexikon von 1885-1892 hier: Der Schwerpunkt des Reichs lag im Reichstag, der seit 1653 in Regensburg ...


1

There is no fixed rule. In essence you will have to learn them as separate words / verbs; the 'derived' forms can have similar or totally different meaning: ordnen -> to bring order into / to tidy anordnen -> to order / to arrange abordnen -> to deploy / to send (someone to do sth) umordnen -> to re-arrange verordnen -> to prescribe / to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included