New answers tagged

3

Ich finde @akuzminykh Vorschlag "lernbereit" passend. Weitere Möglichkeiten sind: feedbackfähig (Feedback klingt weniger negative als Kritik, da es sowohl positives als auch negatives Feedback geben kann) aufgeschlossen für Kritik reflektiert


3

Naja, wenn du ausdrücken möchtest, dass du Kritik gerne hören möchtest – ich interpretiere das mal so, dass du aus der Kritik lernen möchtest – dann wären folgende Wörter passend: lernfähig lernbereit kritikfähig Im Endeffekt möchtest du ja ausdrücken, dass du aus Kritik lernen kannst und der Arbeitgeber sich darauf verlassen kann, dass du Fehler nicht ...


10

As you used card yourself, I want to clarify: If it is a (foldable) card of smaller format which you may insert in an envelope, the common German word is Geburtstagskarte or Glückwunschkarte (includes anniversaries, child births, etc.). You can buy them in places such as bookstores, stationeries or supermarkets. Geburtstagsalbum sounds good, if the object ...


5

As explained in a_donda's answer, "Geburtstagsbuch" should be the way to go. I would like to add some additional considerations about how native speakers might understand this, or related, words: In general, compound nouns that comprise more than two individual parts can be parsed with different combinations of nouns. In the case of "Geburtstagsbuch", these ...


6

It is a "Geburtstagsbuch" or "Geburtstagsalbum", if you mean the customs of making a book with photographies, stories, maybe some lyrics and so on from and about the life of the "Geburtstagskind" (a term not limited to childhood) so far. It may be in the form of a "Tagebuch" (diary or journal). But "Tagebuch" is more used for a very personal journal, often ...


2

I think the most boring answer for this is probably that for most germans the fact that your parents were german is just not going to be extremely relevant if you yourself aren’t and don’t speak the (or a, depending on how you count) german language. It’d be much faster to explain that your parents were german rather than trying to come up with a possibly ...


4

English summary: One possibility is the composite word "Auslanddeutsche(r)" which is neutral and well established for people who juristically are or alternatively at least feel German. Es wurde bis jetzt erst in einem Kommentar erwähnt, aber "Auslanddeutsche(r)" ist ein neutrales durchaus gebräuchliches Wort, es hat zum Beispiel auch einen Wikipediaartikel. ...


4

As @userunknown already said the best single word term is Deutschstämmig (German diaspora) Deutschstämmige are ethnic Germans and their descendants living outside Germany. It also refers to the aspects of migration of German speakers from central Europe to different countries around the world. This definition describes the "German" term as a ...


20

Deutschstämmige Obwohl "deutschstämmig" zu ähnlicher Zeit wie volksdeutsch aufkam und ebenfalls 1940 einen Peak hatte, würde ich das Wort als relativ unbelastet betrachten. Ein wichtiger Unterschied ist, dass volksdeutsch für deutschsprachige Minderheiten im Ausland benutzt wurde, die dorthin (Ungarn, Russland, Ukraine) vor teils mehreren hundert Jahren ...


8

IMO too "Volksdeutsche" carries the mentioned historical and ideological ballast. I'd avoid it. I can't think of a special technical term for the descendants of Germans abroad. The individuals who moved back in the day would certainly have been "Auswanderer" or "Emigranten" (sing. Emigrant/in) from Germany (or naturally "Einwanderer/Immigranten" in Canada). ...


0

Absolutely right! Volksdeutsche was the general name for the German national minorities living in Europe before WWII. By the way I've got some friends from Russia, so as I've heard from them: before and during the WWII there was also such a term used towards ethnic Germans, living in Soviet Union in those times - Volksdeutsche - namely before 1945. You can ...


20

I don't know a single word for that. I have never heard Volksdeutsche. If someone mentioned this to me, I had to ask what exactly is meant. And as you said, it sounds a little strange. Perhaps there are other short terms but I suggest to put it into some more words, to be understood correctly. Ich habe deutsche Wurzeln (I have german roots - perhaps ...


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