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Das Wort "Schmiedeeffekt" gibt es im Deutschen, allerdings in völlig anderer Bedeutung als im ukrainischen Text. Ein Schmiedeeffekt kann bei der Metallverarbeitung auftreten, vgl. z.B. 1, 2, 3. Das Wort wird auch für eine bestimmtes Aussehen einer (ggf. lackierten) Metalloberfäche verwendet; vgl. 4, 5, 6, 7. Wie guidot in seinem Kommentar anmerkt, ...


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Yes, it is archaic, don't use it. "Fräulein" was used to refer to unmarried women, opposed to married woman who would be called "Frau". This distinction was never made for men. "Herrn" is just the accusative or dative form of "Herr" and not all related to "Fräulein". Fräulein is not used anymore for an ...


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"Fräulein" is not used for a young woman, it is used to address or refer to an unmarried woman. It is equivalent to the English "Miss". In contrast, "Frau" was used to address or refer to a married woman, equivalent to English "Mrs". It is no longer common to make this distinction, therefore "Frau" is always ...


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Both Sympathie and sympathy come from the greek word συμπάθεια, meaning having an emotionally positive stance for someone, or showing them love (preference if you will). Just like in Greek, Sympathie in German means affection and love for someone. A synonym for that in German would be die Zuneigung (Sg.). The fact that the English translate to sorrow for ...


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Neither »heimal« nor »hei-dee« are German words. They are not used by German native speakers and have no meaning. The most common German translations for the English salutation »Hey!« is: Hallo! Also in use: He! Hey! The female surname »Heidi« is not Swiss ("Swiss" is not a language, similar to »Canadian« not being a language.) »Heidi« is the ...


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Sympathie affection, fondness; goodwill You sentence seems to come from the context of sex workers offering services in advertisements. There, küssen bei Sympathie means that the prostitute is willing to kiss you if (s)he feels comfortable with you and/or likes you and/or you appear well-groomed and "clean". Here is a Spiegel article that uses the ...


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"full of mistakes" can be translated as "voller Fehler" or "voll von Fehlern" or "voll mit Fehlern". If you want a single word you could use fehlerstrotzend in an attributive context, e.g. "ein fehlerstrotzender Text". I, personally, would not use it not in a predicative way like "Der Text ist ...


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