Hot answers tagged

26

"krass" is actually not such a new word as it's modern slang usage suggests. It is a loanword from Latin "crassus". In general usage "krass" is used for extremes in either a positive or mostly a negative connotation: Diese Aussage steht in krassem Gegensatz zu seiner sonstigen Einstellung. Dies war ein besonders krasser Fall von Betrug. From the 18. ...


24

First thoughts would be: Wer ist dabei? Wer macht mit? Wer geht / kommt mit? (depending on context)


23

It child's speech and often connected to Ätsch --> Ätsch bätsch. Wiktionary (Ätsch) is listing Ätsch bätsch as characteristic word combination. (Ätschi) Bätschi is just another form with the same meaning. Under "Ätsch" some explenations can be found in the internet for example on Duden (Ätsch): Ausruf zum Ausdruck des schadenfrohen Spotts (oft ...


22

If you want to learn German, then you learn standard German, which will be understood in all countries where German is spoken. But »nee« is not a standard-German word. It is a dialect word. »Nee« is part of many dialects, spoken mainly in mid and northern parts of Germany. But there are also German dialects, where »nein« is another word: See also here. If ...


18

"Krass" as a slang term can mean many different things from "cool" over "that's odd" to "what a pity". It depends on the situation. Colloquially it's an all purpose adjective, mainly used by young people. For emphasizing you can use it together with "voll". Examples: "Gestern ist meine Mutter gestorben." (Yesterday my mother died.) "Krass. Tut mir echt ...


17

Kieken ist das berlinerische Wort für gucken, schauen. Kiekstn ist eine Kontraktion von kiekst du denn. Fatzke bezeichnet einen dummen, eitlen Menschen. Der Satz, nach dem du fragst, ist übrigens kein Sprichwort, und ins Englische übersetzt hieße es: What are you looking at, you snob? Und im Hochdeutschen: Was guckst du denn so, du Schnösel / ...


17

He says ich mache viel auf dem Balkon In the context of this conversation he is truly trying to say that he spends a good amount of his free time on the balcony. Some people grow plants, have BBQs or just sit on their balcony. Even though he mentions that he is married, there is no sexual connotation. Of course he doesn’t take the situation very ...


15

There are, as in English, various ways of expressing this. Einen Moment, bitte or einen Augenblick, bitte -- this is absolutely common, sufficiently polite and probably the exact counterpart to One moment, please. You'd say that at the phone if you need to look up something. It's rather neutral, you don't indicate you are feeling pushed (you may add that ...


15

It is a short term for 'mal', that's all. I think the pro-word is Contraction. It even has a specific part about German dialects and contractions. edit: Also refer to Em1's answer & its comments: 'ma' (and 'wa' for this case) can also be used as contractions of 'wir'. Additionally I agree that none of this should be used in formal language.


14

Well, it obviously is some reference to "Vong speech", a rather remarkable variety of German that has its roots in a popular Facebook group and was further popularized by companies desparate to reach more young customers. The "representative" Vong term is I bims (which last year was chosen as the "German Youth Word of the Year" by a publishing house). ...


13

Actually it’s simple for speakers of English, because there are simple, yet precise translations available: genau = exactly/precisely stimmt = correct/true The use cases in German may differ from the English language, but the meaning is very clear. Neither of them is an abbreviation of the other or a combination of both, as some comments state. ...


13

Im Jahr 1990 kam der Film Kevin – Allein zu Haus in die Kinos, und tausende werdende Eltern fanden die Hauptfigur so süß, dass sie die eigenen Kinder danach benannten. Damit stieg der Anteil der Kevins in der Bevölkerung ab den 1990er-Jahren sprunghaft an. Auch die Beliebtheit des Schauspielers Kevin Kostner hat sehr zu diesem Trend beigetragen. Allerdings ...


12

As a programmer I call the technique "rubber ducking" and I have no German translation for that meaning of the term. I would translate "rubber duck" itself (i.e. the toy) as "Quietscheentchen" or "Badeente" as you already wrote, but I've never heard that translation used when referring to the technique. It is relatively common in computer sciences/IT that ...


11

In our software development team, we use the term "Gummiente". Examples: "Ich brauch mal eine Gummiente." "Ich bin verwirrt." -- "Soll ich Deine Gummiente spielen?"


11

Diese Antwort schlägt in die gleiche Kerbe wie Ingmars, würde aber den Rahmen eines Kommentars sprengen. Ich beziehe mich nur auf die Verwendung von von wegen als allein stehenden Ausdruck: Von wegen drückt als Reaktion auf eine Aussage aus, dass diese völlig falsch ist. Weitestgehend äquivalente Phrasen wären: Das ist völlig falsch! Ganz und gar ...


11

Ich zitiere aus dem deutschen Wikipediaartikel: Kiez bezeichnet vor allem in Berlin einen überschaubaren Wohnbereich (beispielsweise einen Stadtteil), oft mit weitgehend vom Krieg verschonten Gründerzeit-Gebäuden in „inselartiger“ Lage und einem identitätsstiftenden Zugehörigkeitsgefühl in der Bevölkerung. In Hamburg steht die Bezeichnung für ...


10

Wahrscheinlich entstammt "abnibbeln" wie so manche umganggsprachliche Wörter aus dem Rotwelsch. Hierzu folgende Referenzen: Franka Birkholz: Rotwelsch - Die geheime Sprache sozialer Außenseiter: abnibbeln - sterben (jidd. niwel - verwelkt) Di Gojim: Kleines jiddisches Glossar: abnibbeln - hebräisch nawol = welken Denkbar ist auch die Herkunft von ...


10

As mentioned in the other answer, its meaning here is mal. Also often used is ma in the sense of wir. Soll ma das machen? => Sollen wir das machen? Ham ma noch was Zeit? => Haben wir noch etwas Zeit? This is true for many parts of Germany, especially Northern Germany, and is not necessarily restricted to young people. However, note that the above two ...


10

The apostrophe signifies that a letter was left out: Schnappe sie alle. This is no longer necessary, or actually correct. Duden has more on the subject.


10

If you are talking about the word "gell" or "gelle" or "gä/ge" (which I presume you do, because I've never heard of "ger" here in Hessen): The word "gell" and its regionally differently pronounced equivalents do not heave a real meaning. It is used to emphasize/indicate a question or ask for confirmation, very much like "right?", "isn't/doesn't it?", "don't ...


10

The German slang equivalent for "What's up" is "Was geht?". While there is no direct translation for "homeboy", "Alter", "Digger" or even "Bro" come very close in my opinion and are commonly used in colloquial (youth) speech to refer to or address a (male) friend. So my proposed translations are Was geht, Alter? Was geht, Digger? Was geht, Bro? Note that "...


9

Again, the Atlas zur deutschen Alltagssprache has an entry for that:


9

Leute ist nicht nur gut, sondern glaube ich auch die gängigste allgemeingültige Variante. Spontan fällt mir gar nichts anderes ein. Somit ist Beispiel (1) richtig. Kerle wird so nicht verwendet. Kerl ist synonym zu Typ. In Satz (2) verwende ich daher auch Leute. Ein paar Beispiele für Kerl: Da hat mich zuletzt so ein Kerl[=Typ] angequatscht. Siehst ...


9

Ein anderer Begriff wäre: schi­ka­nie­ren. Schi­ka­nie­ren bedeutet jemanden mit kleinliche, böswilligen Quälereien (=Schikanen) ärgern. Eine Schikane ist eine: [unter Ausnutzung staatlicher oder dienstlicher Machtbefugnisse getroffene] Maßnahme, durch die jemandem unnötig Schwierigkeiten bereitet werden kleinliche, böswillige Quälerei Eine ...


9

This seems to be from "Peter Fox: Lok auf 2 Beinen" Ich renne bergauf, rolle bergab Durch die Pampa und durch die Stadt Geradeaus, zerkratz meinen Lack, Zack Mit dem Kopf durch die Wand, bis es knackt Bleib wo du bist, ich hole dich ab Ich mach nicht schlapp, auch wenn ich Gicht hab Ich bin am botten, bis ich blutende Hacken hab Kauf wie ne ...


9

Was geht, Alter? Alter (or Alda) is often used to refer to (male*) friends (or strangers for that matter) colloquially. Alter is not dated at all. Some more regional terms include: In Cologne: Bruder or Brudi (Brother) in Hamburg: Digger (from the word dick meaning fat, but usually not pejorative) In Berlin: Keule In the Ruhr area: Kumpel (can sound dated,...


9

A number of languages allow omitting pronouns (even) in formal speech and writing. Spanish is one of them, although the pattern is restricted to subject pronouns. German, like English, is generally "non-pronoun-dropping". However, in informal and colloquial speech, it's not uncommon in either language. Some often-heard examples: Kann sein. (Could be.) ...


8

Im Ruhrgebiet vor 49 Jahren geboren und aufgewachsen, muss ich als Zeitzeugin anmerken, dass ich mit diesem Ausdruck von Kindesbeinen an vertraut bin, dies fand deutlich vor 1990 statt. Ob er schon vor den 1960er Jahren existierte, ist mir aufgrund meiner persönlichen Noch-nicht-Anwesenheit jedoch nicht bekannt.


8

Laut Sendung mit der Maus ist Rutsch ein altes Wort für Reise und man wünscht sich eine gute Reise ins nächste Jahr. Wikipedia sieht das ähnlich und erwähnt als Alternative auch die Erklärung mit dem Jiddischen die knut geschrieben hat. Wenn Du rutschen als Wort für reisen ansiehst, ist "gut gerutscht" = "gut gereist" natürlich richtig; zumindest im ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible