64

You can't call it a need, since Switzerland dropped ß at the beginning of the 20th century and has, apparently, not yet collapsed. But ß does have a function. In intervocalic position, there is a triple opposition: Füße [fyːsə] Küsse [kʏsə] Düse [dyːzə] Here, ß and ss both stand for voiceless [s], with ß signalling a preceding long vowel and ss a ...


34

I grew up near Graz, in the south-east of Austria. The first language that I learned when I was a little child was the local dialect. This dialect has no genitive case, dative and accusative case are often merged into one case, the vocabulary is sometimes different, and the pronunciation is also very different. When I was 6, I entered school and did not ...


27

Because the point of the point (pun intended) is to give the ordinal number instead of the cardinal number. Interestingly enough, English does use ordinal numbers for days when writing "on the fifth of May", or "May 5th" but omits the ordinal marker for dates like 05-05. German is more consistent as it always uses the '.' (Except for the YYYY-MM-DD format ...


23

If you want to learn German, then you learn standard German, which will be understood in all countries where German is spoken. But »nee« is not a standard-German word. It is a dialect word. »Nee« is part of many dialects, spoken mainly in mid and northern parts of Germany. But there are also German dialects, where »nein« is another word: See also here. If ...


21

Your reference to ſz is somewhat misleading, since this is more a typographical aspect, how ß is represented, in the age of Unicode surely not a problem. From purely practical point of view, ß is a sort of convenience, like the uppercase of substantives. In reformed orthography it helps for pronounciation, and in general assists disambiguation: Masse (...


17

It's actually nix It's slang for nichts, as you have guessed. I'd love to say something more but, first, I'd like to understand what is "good to use" (obviously, don't write nix it in a formal context!), and, secondly, I'm not an expert. Whence I'm pretty sure somebody will illuminate us with a better answer.


17

The final "e" in "Bette" indicates the dative case and is not a plural form. It normally isn't used in contemporary German anymore, however there are some fixed expressions like "zu Hause" where it is still encountered nowadays. So Über meinem Bette. is singular and equivalent to Über meinem Bett. and the plural is Über meinen Betten.


15

If you want to learn some formulas as Guten Tag, Auf Wiedersehen, Danke, Bitte, Ja, Nein, and so on, I think you can do it in one week. Whether you can call this "to learn German" is another question. There are books available that promise "Learn German/English in thirty hours" - that is throwing sand in your eyes. They mean thirty lessons of German/English ...


15

Bezüglich der Rechtschreibung für Schulen und Behörden sind die vom Rat für Rechtschreibung entwickelten Rechtschreibregeln gewissermaßen die letzte Instanz. Der Rat kann gewisse Kleinigkeiten eigenhändig entscheiden, untersteht aber letzten Endes der Kultusministerkonferenz bzw. den Landesregierungen, die auch größere Änderungen absegnen müssen. Auch wenn ...


14

Nix is, as was already pointed out, a colloquial, informal, shorter form of nichts. Nix does not derive from any specific dialect; rather it is present in one form or another in most dialects. There are rare exceptions like the Berlin dialect prefering nüscht It is okay to use in very informal writings, like text messages to friends or in a chat etc. Do ...


13

Zwar gibt es keine verbindliche einheitliche Ausspracheregelung für die deutsche Sprache, dennoch gab es und gibt es Versuche einer Normierungen: Bühnensprache nach Siebs Völlig auf die Bedürfnisse einer Theaterbühne ausgerichtet, wurde versucht, die Aussprache der Schauspieler auf den deutschen Theaterbühnen Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts zu normieren. Diese ...


13

Der Herausgeber entscheidet, was in seinem Haus gedruckt wird. Der Chefredakteur entscheidet, was ein Nachrichtensprecher zu sagen hat. Jeder Deutsche entscheidet (natürlich beeinflusst von seinem Umfeld), was er sagt. Jeder Hörer entscheidet eigenmächtig, welchen Gebrauch er anmahnt oder nicht. Es gibt also so viele Autoritäten, wie es Sprechsituationen ...


13

Nouns and articles are conjugated according to the grammatical case we use. In your example the appropriate cases are: Die Frau (Nominative) isst den Apfel (Accusative). Still, grammatically it is possible to use different cases in order to express a different action: Die Frau (Accusative) isst der Apfel (Nominative) = the woman is being eaten by the ...


13

We use the point to get the ordinal, not cardinal number. Compare: der 1. Platz (=der erste Platz) Straße des 17. Juni (=des siebzehnten Juni) That's why we must use the point in dates. According to the range - these would be some common ways of giving a time period: - 30. September 2015 vom 5. bis (zum) 30. September 2015 vom 5. ...


12

It's a bit different from English, where all the following cases would translate into "with": If you learn something "mit jemandem" - Both are learning, that is, you learn "together with someone", probably both at the same level of knowledge. In case you learn something "bei jemandem" - One is learning, one is teaching (case #1, apparently your case), or ...


12

Yes, in large parts of Northern Germany (also well south of Hanover), people nowadays can neither consciously switch between standard German and a local dialect (although they frequently do so automatically and gradually) nor realize that their colloquial speech includes some regional markers that an outsider or a trained linguist would recognize, but ...


12

Nach den langen und sachkundigen Beiträgen oben, hier eine Antwort, für die fünf Zeilen ausreichen: Es kommt darauf an, wer schreibt! - Es gibt nicht "das Deutsch in sozialen Medien". Gebildete und schriftsprachlich eloquente Leute schreiben praktisch so, wie sie in einer Zeitung schreiben würden. Jugendliche bestimmter Gruppen schreiben bewusst mit ...


12

You never ever siezen family members, regardless which grade. It would be very rude, as if you aren't related to that person. The only excuse is not knowing someone is a family member. Children are always addressed du by adults. The border is somewhat at age 16. If you address young adults as Sie, you are forcing them into an adult role, and if you address ...


12

Here eines is not genitive and not an article. Instead "eines" is a pronoun, and its neuter form is eines. You can translate this sentence as One thing right from the start ...


11

Ich clearly is the grammatical subject. There are numerous cues for that: It is in nominative case; subjects usually use this case. It comes right after the verb (though this is not the strongest hint as not 100% fail proof). The verb machen is in accordance with a subject first person singular: mache. Technically it could also be conjunctive 1 ("Der Arzt ...


11

Interessanterweise wurde im Raum Hannover, wie in ganz Norddeutschland, ursprünglich Niederdeutsch gesprochen, das sehr anders ist als die heutige Standardsprache. Es hat insbesondere die Umwandlung von langen Vokalen in Diphthonge und von stimmlosen Verschlußlauten in Affrikaten und dann teilweise weiter nicht mitgemacht. So heißt es im Niederdeutschen ...


11

No, there is no rule that requires you to differentiate in use. Your examples are mostly interchangeable. There are some subtle differences in meaning, particularly stornieren and absagen, but that has nothing to do with the fact that they are separable or not


11

Antwort auf Deutsch Sowohl in die Zukunft als auch in der Zukunft sind grammatisch korrekt, sie bedeuten nur etwas verschiedenes. In in die Zukunft steht Zukunft im Akkusativ, sodass eine Richtung angezeigt wird. In in der Zukunft steht Zukunft im Dativ, sodass ein Ort angezeigt wird. Der Unterschied wird bei einer Übersetzung ins Englische deutlich, ...


11

Phonetics of ä vs ö and ü Like other vowel letters, ä in German represents two sounds, a short vowel and a long vowel. The short ä sound is not a "modification of" the short e sound. They make exactly the same sound in standard German: [ɛ] (so Männer and Ende or bellt and fällt both have the same vowel in the first syllable). The short vowel sound [ɛ] is ...


10

I would avoid two things: Any thick dialect. Think about non-native speakers or people who moved to a certain area just recently. Note also that strong dialect is connected with a lower degree of education in some peoples minds. Any dialect you don't speak properly. People will notice that something is not right there (in the best case) or even feel mocked. ...


10

The URL is: ha te te pe Doppelpunkt Slash Slash german Punkt stackexchange Punkt com Slash question Slash ask Some people say »Schrägstrich« instead of »Slash«. The software version: Windows acht Punkt eins


10

In some German dialects “sie” is pronounced “se”. If you do not speak such a dialect, then using “se” is out of place.


10

Summary: In über meinem Bette sein the word Bette is not plural. It's an antiquated dative singular often found in poetry. Wikipedia quotation: (from the wikipedia article about Dative case, emphasis mine) In general, the dative (German: Dativ) is used to mark the indirect object of a German sentence. For example: Ich schickte dem Mann(e) ...


10

The von construction can be used with indefinite number adjectives, such as but not limited to "dutzende, hunderte, tausende, ...". But it is optional. Thus, both sentences are grammatically correct and used: Es wurden tausende Bücher verbrannt. Es wurden tausende von Büchern verbrannt. The latter construction puts more emphasis on the number. ...


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