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Homonymy between determiners and pronouns The problem at the core of your question is homonymy: Two words that are spelled the same, yet have different properties. A popular example involving two nouns would be Mutter, pl. Mütter "mother" and Mutter, pl. Muttern "nut" (on a screw). In German, there is systematic homonymy between determiners (Artikelwörter)...


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Jede Familie hat dieses eine Kind. Here, eine is not a form of the definite article ein but of the indefinite pronoun ein. Unfortunately, Wiktionary still lists the wrong forms for the different cases. Therefore, I will list the correct ones here, together with the forms of its antonym ander (N = Nominativ, G = Genitiv, D = Dativ, A = Akkusativ): Neuter: ...


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Eine is not an article here, but behaves like an adjective (or numeral) meaning "one", since dieses already fulfills the article role. Compare: dieses/das/jedes eine Kind -- this/the/each one child dieses/das/jedes nervige Kind -- this/the/each annoying child dieses/das/jedes kranke Kind -- this/the/each sick child These are some examples of determiners ...


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Er ist nicht in der Lage ... means literally He is not in a position to ... So that's more about the circumstances. Er kann nicht ... is about the (current or fundamental) ability. If you want to say, that the little girl can't ride a bicycle (but she can learn it), you would use Sie kann (noch) nicht Fahrrad fahren. If you want to say, that ...


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You can easily use this in a general conversation. As an example: "Ich bin nicht in der Lage diese Gläser zu servieren" (I’m not able to serve these glasses), or "Ich bin in der Lage diese schwere Kiste zu heben" (I‘m able to lift this heavy box). But both example you can say with "kann nicht/kann" (Ich kann diese Gläser nicht servieren/Ich kann diese ...


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The accepted and most-voted answer refuses the regional aspect of the suffix -ingen. It had been used to name places wherever Germanic peoples settled including Scandinavia and Great Britain and generally refers to a person (see also Merovingian, Carolingian). Still, the OP is right in suggesting that it is much more prevalent in Southern Germany: Among the ...


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Viel is an adverb (and as such never has endings) meaning "much" and is used with non-countable nouns and singular such as Milch, Zeit, Geld, Arbeit, etc., regardless of gender: Ich habe nicht viel Zeit. Er hat viel Geld. Es gibt nicht viel Milch im Kühlschrank. Leider habe ich zu viel Arbeit. Viele is a (plural) adjective of indefinite ...


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I'd say it depends on the meaning of "just" in the english sentence: He just called meas in he called just a minute ago could be Er hat mich gerade eben angerufen Er hat mich gerade angerufen Er hat mich eben angerufen but einfach would be wrong in this context. If you want to express some kind of surprise or indignation, as in He just ...


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"Geh (jetzt) einfach in den Supermarkt!" would indeed be Just go to the supermarket (already)!. Nike's slogan just do it can be translated as Mach es einfach. On the other hand, "einfach" can also mean simple (eine einfache Mathematikaufgabe; opposite of "schwierig") and once (not twice): "Eine einfache Wiederholung" could thus mean "a one-time repetition",...


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All three translations are correct. Er hat mich eben angerufen?and Er hat mich gerade angerufen? are basically equivalent and express a temporal relation. In some regions of Germany, people might consider eben to be a bit further in the past than gerade, but the difference is insignificant. The third translation re-translated to English might be He simply ...


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Nichts ist die korrekte Schreibweise und Aussprache, und die einzige, die im Schriftdeutsch verwendet wird, sofern nicht bewusst ein umgangssprachlicher Ton angedeutet werden soll. Daneben gibt es verschiedene umgangssprachliche Varianten, die in unterschiedlichen Regionen in Verwendung sind und normalerweise eine gewisse Vereinfachung der Aussprache ...


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I really like to read Newspapers in German and English. My general experience is that the differences between Austrian Standard German, Federal German Standard German, and Swiss Standard German are very much comparable to the differences between American, Australian, British, Canadian, and Indian English. However, there are barely any spelling differences ...


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I would like to add that Swiss Standard German (as used by swiss newspapers) no longer uses the letter ß. Instead every ß is rewritten as ss, which would be a mistake in Standard German.


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Yes, you will. Not only in the Swiss dialects, but also in written Swiss standard German (as used in the press), word and expression usage can differ so significantly that even a native German speaker can have problems at least to capture details in a regular Swiss text. Some examples are: Words which are slightly different, but still likely understood, ...


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With the small exception of words commonly used in a specific region, all "German" newspapers are written in "Hochdeutsch" - which is the common German tongue. If, at a later time, you want to listen to German being spoken, you should make sure that its "Hochdeutsch", best spoken in the region around Hannover


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Reading a Swiss or Austrian newspaper will increase the likelihood of encountering constructions that may be rejected by Germans as not conforming to the standard. For instance, note the position of the finite verb in the following sentence: Man könnte bemängeln, dass die Lenkung einen Tick direkter ausfallen hätte dürfen. NZZ (instead of hätte ...


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The Swiss newspapers (as an example NZZ) are grammatically correct and do not show any disadvantage to learning the german language. As in Germany, there are various dialects (language regions) in Switzerland, but this does not affect in a newspaper, dialects are not used there (however, I can only confirm this from Swiss newspapers). So if you want to learn ...


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You will encounter vocabulary that isn't widely understood in Germany or Austria. But it's the same the other way. German speakers have to live with that. The worst thing which could happen is that you are mistaken for a Swiss.


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The suffix ingen is taken from the ancient Allemani language, and means “the people from.” The Allemani were an old Germanic tribe.


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