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3

Du hast völlig Recht, beides ist möglich, sowohl Wenn ..., würden die Emails schneller beantwortet. als auch Wenn ..., würden die Emails schneller beantwortet werden. Der Unterschied liegt nur darin, dass bei der ersten Variante der "direkte" Konjunktiv II von werden benutzt wird, also würden. Bei der zweiten Variante dagegen wird der "...


2

That's no subjunctive, but rather an archaic remnant of an imperative in 3rd person. (This mode is actually called "Jussiv") This was used roughly in the middle ages by upper-class persons to express contemptousness to the adressed person. The King would have addressed the servant with Er schenke mir noch Wein nach


3

Man staunt (Indikativ) means that the author is informing the reader that people (or he himself) are astonished, while man staune (Konjunktiv I) is an invitation or request to the reader to be astonished or to marvel. A similar, quite popular, use of Konjunktiv as a request is: Man möge mir die Frage verzeihen ... or Man verzeihe mir die Frage ... A ...


4

In this case, there is a distinct difference in meaning between the present tense and the Konjunktiv. The present tense can express an expectation or denote a rumor or unconfirmed claim: Er soll für die Regierung arbeiten. "He is expected to work for the government." "It is said that he works for the government." The Konjunktiv is used ...


6

Yes, this is correct. "soll" can be used for hearsay, with the nuance that the speaker tends to believe it's true. I can tell you, for example, "Der Präsident soll sich nach Florida zurückgezogen haben", which means that I heard it, but am not 100% certain. In this sentence, "soll" is in the Indikativ mode. Konjunktiv "...


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