34

I'm a British person living in Zürich and this has been my experience: Absolutely all German-speaking Swiss will understand you and be able to respond if you speak to them in Hochdeutsch. Although Schwyzerdütsch is the language most used in everyday life, Swiss schools are taught in Hochdeutsch and many programmes on Swiss TV are imported from Germany. They ...


29

Yes, you will. Not only in the Swiss dialects, but also in written Swiss standard German (as used in the press), word and expression usage can differ so significantly that even a native German speaker can have problems at least to capture details in a regular Swiss text. Some examples are: Words which are slightly different, but still likely understood, ...


24

"MITTLE" should be "MITTEL" (in the meaning of chemical substance), and Kühlmittel is the cooling liquid in the engine. You are right about NIEDR being short for niedrig = low, and you already guessed the consequence: Stop the engine because there is not enough cooling liquid left.


18

You will encounter vocabulary that isn't widely understood in Germany or Austria. But it's the same the other way. German speakers have to live with that. The worst thing which could happen is that you are mistaken for a Swiss.


13

Die Bildung des Partizips gewesen aus sein wurde nach Grimm bereits sehr früh im Gotischen vollzogen. Erst viel später trat eine weitere Form gesîn in Anlehnung von sîn auf, die sich in mehreren mittelhochdeutschen Dialekten findet: gesîn ist besonders dem alem. eigen und hier seit dem 12. jahrh. die gewöhnlichste form. Das heißt, dass in den ...


11

"GETRIEBEÖL WECHS" is probably "Getriebeöl wechseln" (Change the gearbox oil) and "NÄCHSTE WART." is probably "Nächste Wartung" (next maintenance). For me it sounds like it it not urgent, but that you should change the gearbox oil when you have the next maintenance. (Warnung: I have no idea about car mechanics, I just translated and interpreted the German)


11

Reading a Swiss or Austrian newspaper will increase the likelihood of encountering constructions that may be rejected by Germans as not conforming to the standard. For instance, note the position of the finite verb in the following sentence: Man könnte bemängeln, dass die Lenkung einen Tick direkter ausfallen hätte dürfen. NZZ (instead of hätte ...


8

I am a native German speaker from Berlin and have not studied languages, so I can only speak from my own experience. When it comes to the written language, the differences between standard German in Austria, Germany and Switzerland are small (think American and British English). I see no harm in mixing your reading material. When I go to Switzerland I may ...


7

Weitere höfliche, vielleicht schon etwas in die Jahre gekommene Grussformen wären: Grüess Gott (wohl) Grüessech Grüezi wohl Höfliche Grussformen nach Tageszeiten, wobei "Tag wohl" eigentlich immer verwendbar sein sollte, solange es hell ist: Guete Tag (Guete) Morge / (-n) Abig / (-n) Abed Tag wohl Auch diese Liste ist nicht ...


6

Da der Zusammenhang hergestellt wurde... Gemeint ist die Registerkarte oder üblicher der Reiter.


6

When talking about "standard German" you should know that there are three standard variations of German: German German (yes, sounds funny, but this is its official name) Austrian German Swiss German You can think of the differences between this variation like the differences between american and british english. This means: the three variations are very ...


6

Wenn man entsprechende Publikationen aus der Schweiz liest, fällt auf, dass dort, wenn von "Schweizerdeutsch" geredet wird, die Mundart oder der Dialekt gemeint ist. Standardprache wird als "Hochdeutsch" oder seltener "Schweizerhochdeutsch" bezeichnet: Schweizerdeutsch, das in den Familien und im täglichen Umgang gesprochen wird, unterscheidet sich ...


6

I really like to read Newspapers in German and English. My general experience is that the differences between Austrian Standard German, Federal German Standard German, and Swiss Standard German are very much comparable to the differences between American, Australian, British, Canadian, and Indian English. However, there are barely any spelling differences ...


5

Thankfully, Swiss Radio and Television (Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen, SRF) have audio and video news available online. These news broadcasts are often spoken in Swiss standard German rather than in Swiss dialects. I opened the first article I saw and listened in until I heard a word that would be written with ß in German. Well, to be honest, I waited for ...


5

This is Swiss German. If you owe money to someone (let's say to a bank), and you failed to pay, then the creditor (here: the bank) can call a lawyer to recover the money. In all regions you can say: Die Bank treibt Geld von Herrn Huber ein. The bank recovers money from Mr. Huber. In Swiss German you also can say: Herr Huber wird von der Bank ...


5

I would recommend the following public broadcasting resources for listening to standard German as you called it: Deutschlanddadio Kultur Deutschlandfunk DRadio Wissen A lot of their shows come along with a text version. Please see also resources for learning German. Diving into German accents is certainly not a good idea for an average learner. It is ...


4

Laut den Schreibweisungen der Schweizerischen Bundeskanzlei ist für amtliche Texte der Leitfaden zur deutschen Rechtschreibung verbindlich. Zusätzlich können die Rechtschreibwörterbücher Duden Band 1: Die deutsche Rechtschreibung. 24. Auflage oder neuer. Mannheim: Dudenverlag und Wahrig Rechtschreibung: Die deutsche Rechtschreibung. 8. Auflage oder neuer....


4

It is acceptable, because it is also common to use "SS" for words written in up-case letters, as there is no capital "ß" in the official orthography rules, so the up-case version of "Straße" ist "STRASSE" (sometimes you see things like "STRAßE" which is just a horribly incorrect spelling). Therefore, writing "Strasse" instead of "Straße" would be formally ...


4

Im Schweizerdeutschen unterscheidet man zwischen: "Ich han es Puff" = "Ich habe Unordnung/Durcheinander/Chaos." und "Ich gange in Puff.", "Ich bin imene Puff gsii" = "Ich gehe in ein Bordell", "Ich war in einem Bordell" Das Wort 'Puff' im Sinne von Chaos hört man in der Schweiz im Alltag regelmässig. Es bedeutet nichts Anstössiges, selbst kleine Kinder ...


4

German is not my mother tongue, so I can't really answer about specifics of things like ß vs. ss and um 5 Euro vs. für 5 Euro. Nonetheless, I see the underlying situation as being not so different from that of an American working in the UK, or a Brit working in the USA etc. In any case, I would suggest heeding the advice of the proverb, When in Rome, do as ...


4

Ich antworte auf Deutsch, weil ich davon ausgehe, dass das deine Muttersprache ist. ss - ß Die Entscheidung, ob das scharfe S durch ein Doppel-S ersetzt werden darf, hat nichts mit Grammatik zu tun. Das gehört ganz eindeutig in das Gebiet der Rechtschreibung, und hier ist die Regelung ganz klar: Das generelle Ersetzen ist nur im schweizerischen Deutsch ...


4

I would like to add that Swiss Standard German (as used by swiss newspapers) no longer uses the letter ß. Instead every ß is rewritten as ss, which would be a mistake in Standard German.


3

Schweizerdeutsch Schweizerdeutsch (Eigenbezeichnungen »Schwizerdütsch«, »Schwiizertüütsch« usw.) ist eine Gruppe westoberdeutsche Dialekte, die vornehmlich in der Schweiz gesprochen werden. Auch in angrenzenden Gebieten (im Süden Deutschlands und im Westen Österreichs) werden ähnliche Dialekte gesprochen. Schweizerdeutsch unterteilt sich in ...


3

Der erste Absatz beschreibt das Schweizer Dialektkontinuum, dem übrigens nicht nur alemannische, sondern auch zu einem ganz kleinen Teil bairische Dialekte (gesprochen in Samnaun) angehören. Man sollte es am besten unmissverständlich als schweizerische Dialekte bezeichnen. (Wie genau man die Grenze der Dialekte zieht, ob man die bairischen Varianten des ...


3

Ein derartiges vollständiges Wörterbuch des Schweizer Hochdeutsch gibt es meines Wissens nicht. Es gibt jedoch eine Anzahl Wörterbücher, die dieses Gebiet jeweils zu einem Teil abdecken: Der Duden-Band Schweizerhochdeutsch: Wörterbuch der Standardsprache in der deutschen Schweiz kommt dem Gesuchten nahe, da es ausschließlich die Schweizer Standardsprache ...


3

I think that there does not exist a really convincing explanation. In point 3. you refer to Peter Gallmann who is a Swiss linguist and a long-standing professor for "Deutsche Sprache der Gegenwart" at the Friedrich-Schiller-Universität in Jena. In his article he discusses various hypotheses concerning the history of printing and technical issues (typewriter)...


3

Wie wäre es, du machst folgendes: Gar nichts! Du kannst meines Erachtens einfach weiter deine bewährten Schweizer Schreibweisen und Ausdrücke verwenden. Wer es liest und wem es überhaupt auffällt, der denkt sich eben: "Ah, ein Schweizer! Das trifft man selten!" Ich persönlich würde es sogar interessant finden, einen Brief mit leichten Schweizer ...


3

Three questions, three answers: Are translations for Germany different to those for Switzerland and Austria? Yes. German is a pluricentric language, like English and many other languages, too. Think about a english-learner, who asks: How does »Farbe« translate — »color« or »colour«? All resources list both »color«, and »colour« as valid but ...


3

Yes. Replacing 'ß' with 'ss' is the correct thing to do if there's no 'ß' character available. Otherwise, use of 'ß' is orthographically mandatory in Germany, Austria and Luxemburg.


3

I spent a year in Switzerland, although it was in Geneva (Genf) and not the German speaking part. German is a "foreign" language to most French speakers. When speaking with someone from the central/eastern part of the country, they will "always" speak English, "never" German (except among close friends). More to the point, many Schwyzerdütsch-speaking ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible