New answers tagged

3

As idmean already mentioned in the comments to your question, both "sicher" and geborgen" aren't verbs, but adjectives. Regarding the difference between the two, "sicher" has a more objective vibe to it, while "geborgen" is more about the subjective feeling. "Geborgen" is a form of the verb "bergen", ...


4

The verb spielen can take multiple different extensions. If you want to name the exact game you're playing, that will be an accusative object: Ich spiele das Hütchenspiel. Although in many cases you won't be able to tell as the proper noun will just take the null article (and many game names rarely take articles at all): Ich spiele Schafkopf. The same, ...


0

(Swiss) German dialects are spoken languages and don't have a standardized spelling or orthography. This means that everyone can write dialectal words however they want. Depending on which variant of a dialect someone speaks, the French loanword salut /sa'ly/ "hello; goodbye" will sound more like ['saly] or ['sali] (note how the stress has moved ...


3

The Swiss German greeting words “Sali” or “Salü” are not much older than 100 years. In the Swiss German dictionary of 1913, "Salü" is explained as follows: Especially common in certain circles and among young people "besonders in bestimmten Kreisen und bei jungen Leuten üblich" "Sali" and "Salü" do not differ, and ...


Top 50 recent answers are included