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7

Being a second-language English speaker, I would say your second translation is more appropriate: Because no one gives you guarantees; no beloved God does either, unfortunately But actually, lieber Gott would better translate to "dear god", or even just "god", as it is an idiomatic fixed phrase just referring to god, especially when ...


10

This is just an extended comment to Shegit Brahm's fitting answer. The word "Abendland" is basically a synonyom for the Western world or simply "the West". Quotation from Wikipedia: The concept of the Western part of the earth has its roots in the theological, methodological and emphatical division between the Western Roman Catholic and ...


18

While I agree on the core of Philipp's answer, I'd like to elaborate about the song context a little bit more: First about the context: As the page says, it is about Alice (Weidel) and Sarah (Bossard) Alice is party leader of the AFD, a rightwing/far right/rightist extreme party in Germany Sarah is her wife and of Sri Lankian/Indian descent That makes a ...


7

Rettung des Abendlandes originally refers to the Ottoman wars in Europe, particularly to the defeat of the Ottomans at the second siege of Vienna 1683. I think you can guess how modern speakers could use this idiom for all sorts of us versus them rhetoric. Without trying to write it in lyrical form: Seldom one can hear you complain: "I'm not allowed to ...


4

Es kommt durchaus auf das jeweilige Verhältnis untereinander an. Eine relativ wenig vorwurfsvolle Variante ist Hattest Du schon einmal Zeit, Dir meine Fragen vom Freitag anzugucken? Konntest Du Dir über meine Fragen vom Freitag schon etwas Gedanken machen? Natürlich lässt sich das ganze auch mit 'Sie' formulieren, wenn ihr nicht per Du seid. Man kann dem ...


4

In general for computer science I learned software development in a time where every book was meticulously cleaned from English words, which made it only hard for me to learn new languages later. Honestly, I wouldn't translate technical terms in software engineering too much. Because if you do, especially for coding techniques, your readers have a hard time ...


3

Es gibt hinreichend viele Beispiele für den Infinitiv aus vergleichsweise grauer Vorzeit: hier öffnen auf Konserven und ähnlichen Gefäßen drücken und ziehen auf Türen Während der Fahrt nicht mit dem Fahrer sprechen Damit ist klar: Der Infinitiv ist (zumindest: auch) richtig. Er hat zudem den Charme, dass er bezüglich Sender und Empfänger neutral ist. ...


5

Zunächst: Ich kenne keine normative deutschsprachige Anweisung, ob Infinitiv oder Imperativ (oder etwas anderes) zu bevorzugen wäre. "Sprachunabhängige" (sic) Ui-Guidelines verschiedener Betriebssystemhersteller (hier: Windows, teilweise auch MacOS) schreiben allerdings den Infinitiv für Aktionen ("Print") und das Gerundium (sic) für ...


2

Vergleichen wir mal Deutsch und Englisch: Infinitiv En.: to save, to invite friends, to attack De.: speichern, Freunde einladen, angreifen Imperativ En.: save, invite friends, attack De. du: speichere, lade Freunde ein, greif an De. Sie: speichern Sie, laden Sie Freunde ein, greifen Sie an Auf Englisch ist der Imperativ immer um 3 Zeichen kürzer als der ...


4

While I am native in German, I still had problems to understand the English translation. The German sentence is definitive complicated, but not as brain damaging as the English one. It took me quite some time to figure out why. First, the translation is very literal. Too literal for my taste. "Ich stelle Fragen." should be rather translated with &...


1

As other mentioned in the comments to the question, without further context it's hard to give a comprehensive answer. But there's one aspect that probably is at play here: In English, there are (at least) two different ways to unterstand "morality". One includes somewhat of a shift in meaning compared to "mores", the other doesn't. In ...


0

I would say "You will be eliminated" or "You are being eliminated". Here is definitely passive voice. German doesn't have a continuous tense and the presence tense is often used to describe the near future. I don't know the context, but I wouldn't use the word "eliminieren" at all, except maybe describing the Terminator film.


10

Müssen ... haben works fairly well in German and quite the same way as in English: "Wo ist Bob? Ist er noch nicht hier?" "Hm... er muss es vergessen haben." There are alternatives, such as: "Er wird es vergessen haben." meaning "I assume he has forgotten [about it]". A famous example from German literature: Jemand ...


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