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5

In professional cooking, a lot of French terms are used. Mise en place is the correct term in German, too, and it's the only one that I can think of that really fits cooking. If you insist on translating it, good verbs that are used in other crafts are etwas bereitlegen or sich etwas zurechtlegen, there are no commonly used nouns "Bereitlegung" or &...


3

I think your translation "In the 19th century, it was ..." sums up what's going on in the German version; just leave out the colon, which doesn't seem necessary anyway. Grammatically, the es here is the "impersonal es" which is used as a subject when there is nothing around that's "doing" whatever it is the verb says is going on....


3

Die Übernahme eines fremdsprachigen Begriffs in die dt. Sprache ist etwas anderes, als die Angabe einer Übersetzung. Bei der Übersetzung wird es geschrieben wie es in der betreffenden Sprache - hier Englisch - nun mal geschrieben wird. Es bleibt ein fremdsprachiger Begriff, bei der Eingemeindung als Fremdwort dagegen wird es, als Hauptwort, eben groß ...


6

You are right with your assumption. Los geht's! means indeed something like Here we go!. The expression Geht los! may mean the same as above in sloppy speech, when you assume that the Es is omitted. Es geht los! would be correct in this sense. Literally translated Geht los! means imperative plural, meaning Go on!. Singular would be Geh los!, which seems to ...


-1

A student sitting in the front row of the classroom can understand/hear well what a math teacher is saying. However, it is not certain that he also comprehends/grasps what the math teacher is saying. Ein Schüler, der in der ersten Reihe des Klassenzimmers sitzt, kann gut verstehen/hören, was ein Mathematikleher sagt. Es ist aber nicht sicher, dass er auch ...


2

First of all the sentence should read Es gehört dazu allerdings, dass man sich nicht durch übertriebenes Nationalgefühl blenden lässt, wie es bei einem großen Teil der Franzosen und Deutschen der Fall ist. Note, that German is case-sensitive. It's important to observe the use of capital or small initial letters since the meaning could change drastically....


5

I have never heard this word before, but a Google search gives some useful information. 1: This source suggests that the word may be of Russian origin. Allein die Russen lieben es, aus jedem Ding einen abstrakten Ismus zu bilden; [...] So bezeichnete man mit "Potsdamismus" gewisse Dinge,die sich auf Friedrich den Großen bezogen, weil er mit ...


1

The term Potsdamismus is in fact related to the city name Potsdam. You will not find it anywhere in a dictionary, but it is quite common in German to form new nouns from proper names by adding the suffix "-ismus" to them, like "Stalinismus", "Marxismus", ... Ismus itself is an expression derived from this habit and derogatively ...


0

This is just an addendum to Hubert Schölnast's comprehensive answer. If the seller (buyer) is a natural person, then the rules explained by Hubert definitely apply. But if the seller (buyer) is a legal entity, then most frequently the female form is used. The reason is that a company's legal form is a specified Gesellschaft (GmbH, OHG, GbR, KG, AG, ...) ...


3

Like in any other situations too, German pronouns always inherit their grammatical Gender from the noun to which they refer. So, when you use the noun »der Verkäufer«, which is a masculine noun, you have to use the masculine pronoun »er«: The seller acknowledges that it has received the goods. Der Verkäufer bestätigt, dass er die Ware erhalten hat. But »...


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