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"Ein Satz mit X" follows the pattern of crossword-puzzle cues, like "a city with six letters, starts with L". Such phrases are usually not intonated with the raising tone of a question. Thus, in the given case, it works as a rhetorical question. As rhetorical as it is, it does not per se offer enough information about the puzzle. "...


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Ich kenne das vor allem mündlich und würde es kürzer und mit einem kleinen Buchstaben 𝑥 schreiben: „Ein Satz mit 𝑥 — das war wohl nix.“ Damit drückt der Sprecher ganz einfach die eigene Unfähigkeit aus, triviale mathematische Formeln mit freien Variablen, mit 𝑥 als Hauptvertreter, zu verstehen und folglich einfache Schulaufgaben wie etwa „Lösen Sie die ...


2

This is not a question of spelling per se. The two different spellings represent two different pronunciations: eure is pronounced [ˈɔɪ̯ʁə] and euere [ˈɔɪ̯əʁə]. The latter is the expected form that results from appending -e to the base euer. The change from euere to eure is the result of syncope, whereby an unstressed vowel is lost in the interior of a word. ...


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The word "euere" exists, but no German uses it. If you want plural in your example, then use "Sucht ihr eure Kamera?" or "Sucht ihr die Kamera?" If you want to deposit, use "Suchst du deine Kamera?" or "Suchst du die Kamera?. I know that because I live in Germany and speak German. First I had to google "...


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Both versions are correct and mean the same thing, and their spellings have not changed in the wake of the spelling reform. But "eure" is used about 80 to 100 times more often than "euere", and in the last 200 years there never was an era when these words was used with an equal frequency or when "euere" was even used more ...


2

Both spellings are equally correct for the possessive pronoun. See this Duden example: raucht ihr immer noch täglich eu[e]re (die eurer Gewohnheit entsprechenden) 20 Zigaretten? which is the same use case as in your example.


2

The adverb nebenbei, meaning apropos or by the way, is a single word. This implies that there cannot be an acronym of it. (By definition an acronym is formed from the initial letters or syllables of multiple words.) In fact, there is not even an official abbreviation of nebenbei. The one you had in mind, n.b. (also N.B. or NB), is already reserved for nota ...


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