25

It's just a matter of style; the meaning is the same. In everyday spoken German you say "aufmachen", in written or higher-register German you say or write "öffnen".


23

It depends on whether you refer to the abstract concept of possible existence, or the actual presence of something. Abstract: English: "There are many ways to express your feelings." German: "Es gibt viele Wege, Deine Gefühle auszudrücken." Actual: English: "There is money on the table over there." German: "Da liegt Geld auf dem Tisch". You would not say ...


23

Ich hätte gerne This expression (usually) requires a noun following it. Ich hätte gerne drei Semmeln Ich hätte gerne einen Freund But: Ich hätte gerne gezahlt This last one is substantially different from the first two. Those first two are the subjunctive II forms of haben followed by the word gern(e) (to make the sentence more polite), and are ...


20

I don't quite agree with the other two answers. Even in English, "I was robbed" is usually not the past tense of the state of "being robbed", but rather understood to mean that someone robbed you. That is, "I was robbed" is the passive voice (in the past tense) of "to rob". Same in German. "Ich wurde ausgeraubt" is the correct passive construction (in the ...


20

According to its definition, sollen is used if something is not completely obligatory, but it would be really disadvantageous for somebody if the opposite happened, whereas müssen is really strict and utilized to determine rules and laws or if something is an inevitable condition for something else. Note that the opposite of müssen (a prohibition) is nicht ...


16

Man kann ein Fest durchaus begehen. Der Ausdruck ist aber sehr "vornehm" und wird immer seltener verwendet. Für so etwas "normales" wie Weihnachten, das jedes Jahr stattfindet, würde ich ihn eher nicht verwenden - Von einem 50-Jährigen Betriebsjubiläum oder einen 100ten Geburtstag kann man aber durchaus hin und wieder in der Zeitung lesen, dass sie feierlich ...


13

There's a slight difference in register: öffnen is considered the standard expression for open, whereas aufmachen is somewhat more informal. It can be used sometimes, but not always, instead of öffnen. You're on the safe side with öffnen.


11

While sein is the most generally applicable way to denote the location of anything, it is indeed quite common in German to be more precise if possible. Befinden is not more specific than sein when referring to locations, but it is a higher register in terms of formality. Which more specific verb you can use depends a lot less on the kind of object you are ...


11

Heucheln ist das Vorspielen einer Emotion und wird oft zusammen mit einem Substantiv benutzt. Es ist grundsätzlich negativ besetzt, es betont die Unaufrichtigkeit der Handlung oder des Handelnden. Er heuchelte Mitgefühl. So tun, als ob ist zunächst neutral, man kann aus verschiedenen Gründen eine Handlung nur scheinbar durchführen. Es hängt vom Kontext ...


10

Good news: you can use "sein" in all of this cases, especially when talking, and even more so as a foreigner. It is just an issue of style in written language to avoid these weak verbs ("sein", "haben") and use more specialized ones. I have just a small problem with your choice "der Laden steht an der Ecke" (also confirmed by @hellcode). While I had no ...


10

Both forms are equivalent, you can choose whichever you want.


10

Basically, they all mean the same. Though each one has a slight different viewpoint. "sich ausruhen" just means you need calm (Ruhe). Often this is the case after stress. You simply need a break. Your power has gone. "sich entspannen" and "ausspannen" are literally meant to reduce the tension (Spannung), although prefix "aus-" emphasizes you're taking ...


10

The difference between kennen and wissen is not about places referred to, whether the place is extraordinary or you're talking about fact or fiction or whatever: It's simply two different words with two different meanings that both unfortunately overlap with the meaning of "to know" in English. "kennen" is about familiarity, "wissen" is about knowledge. "...


9

Just to add to the other answers: "Öffnen" can be replaced by "aufmachen" only if used transitively; if used reflexively, the replacement is not possible: You can say "die Tür öffnet sich" but not "die Tür macht sich auf". However note: "Der Laden öffnet um zehn Uhr" can be replaced with "Der Laden macht um zehn Uhr auf". That's because while its meaning ...


9

Actually, you probably should use "probieren". The sentence you provided is not really proper German. You probably meant: Der Restaurantkritiker hat meinen Kuchen probiert. I say "probably" just in case you meant "Dem Restaurantkritiker hat mein Kuchen geschmeckt." For reference: "testen": Try out. Not typically used in the context of food, but e.g. ...


9

No, these sentences are not correct, as wachsen cannot be used like that. The closest form that I can think of (and that probably matches what you want to express) is zu ... heranwachsen: Er wuchs zu einem verschlossenen Kind heran. Er ist zu einem verschlossenen Menschen herangewachsen.


9

Every German verb ends in -n. To transform a foreign verb to a German one ("eindeutschen") you can add an -n or -en and you're basically done. Taking the English verb (to) recycle, the German form would be recyclen. However, since you can kind of hear an "e" here: recycele (especially if you pronounce it slowly), Germans would rather write it like this: ...


8

Der Wagen gefällt mir. Kann ich eine Probefahrt machen? Möchte man dann den Wagen um den Block fahren, so spricht man von Probe fahren oder eine Probefahrt machen. Side note: Ein Auto ist nicht unbedingt ein Objekt, das man mag, nur weil man es sich mal eben angeschaut hat. Manche mögen ihr Auto mit den Jahren liebgewonnen haben und geben dem Auto sogar ...


8

Die Aggression seinem Bruder gegenüber ist OK. Etwas einfacher ist Die Aggression gegen seinen Bruder Für is eating him alive passt fällt über ihn her aber nicht (btw: Es muss "über ihn" heißen, nicht "über sich"). Besser vielleicht Die Aggression gegen seinen Bruder macht ihn wahnsinnig. Die Aggression gegen seinen Bruder belastet ...


8

In this context abgeschlossen is the only correct word given the choices: You are writing a job application (or something like that) and you have completed your Masters successfully (I assume). Abgeschlossen is just the right word for that situation. Other words: vollendet, absolviert. Beenden in this context is weird, because it does not imply that you have ...


8

Müssen expresses general obligation. Sollen is an obligation given by someone. So when you use sollen, you do imply that someone told you so. Ich muss gehen. I have to go (for whatever reason). Ich soll gehen. I have (just) been told to go. Common contexts for sollen are doctors orders as well as the ten commandments. Note that the the situation is ...


7

Das Wort "abspielen" bezieht sich fast immer auf Aufnahmen (recordings) oder Ereignisse. Das Wort "spielen" ist einerseits das "play", z.B. spielen mit Spielzeug, andererseits aber auch das "play" wie in "playing guitar". Jetzt kann man recht eindeutig den Bezug herstellen: Der Gitarrist spielt die Gitarre. ...


7

Sich unterhalten means to have a conversation, i.e. it involves both talking and listening. Sprechen simply means to speak: you do that in a conversation, too, but it can also be one-sided. Think of der Sprecher (speaker), der Lautsprecher (loudspeaker), der Fernsprecher (old word for telephone), der Fürsprecher (intercessor) etc.


7

Im Englischen benutzt man "to go" um irgendwohin zu gelangen ("I go to Europe", "I go to the store", "I go by train"). Das sagt nicht unbedingt etwas darüber aus, wie man dahin kommt. Im Deutschen bezieht sich gehen immer auf die eigenen Füße (to walk). Deshalb kannst Du "losgehen" hier nicht verwenden, denn das würde heißen, dass der Busfahrer den Bus ...


7

raten: more advise than recommend. With a bit of certainty, “I know what is best, do X”. (Be sure to use a dative object (whom do you advise, wem rätst du etwas) or it can mean guess.) empfehlen: recommend. More subjective than “raten”, ”I like Y best, try that”. anraten, zuraten: sound old-fashioned. Seldom used nowadays. Also beraten: counsel, advise. “...


7

Ja, daran solltest du dich gewöhnen. Diese Art, das Präsens zu verwenden heißt historisches Präsens. Es ist ein Stilmittel, das genau in solchen Fällen wie in deinem Beispiel gerne verwendet wird. Der Kontext (z.B. Jahreszahlen) macht dem Leser eindeutig klar, dass hier ein Ereignis aus der Vergangenheit beschrieben wird. Das Präsens wird gewählt, um die ...


7

Ich esse einen Apfel. is the only correct sentence if you want to say that you're eating an apple. Ich bin einen Apfel essen wouldn't be a meaningful translation. (However, it can be a correct sentence in another context: for instance, when you are asked on the phone what you're doing and you would respond I went to eat an apple.) Note that essen is the ...


6

Maybe you should open up more than one question for it ;) However: (eine Tür) verschließen can be used for both: closing a door or locking a door, whereas (eine Tür) schließen just means closing. (eine Tür) zumachen and (eine Tür) schließen are pretty much the same, but zumachen is not the best German — Not sure whether you can say that in English, but ...


6

Richtig: Mein Freund ist nach einem Autounfall im Krankenhaus gelandet. Bei Verben der Bewegung bildet man die Perfekt-Zeiten mit "sein": ich bin gegangen/gelaufen/geschwommen/geflogen. Letztendlich aber doch ein etwas schwieriges Gebiet - die Perfekt-Zeiten mit "sein". "landen" für "to end up" ist gut!


6

In standard German "gehen" almost always means "to go by foot". To make matters worse, however, there are a few exceptions: It can mean to emigrate, or move somewhere for some time: Ich gehe für ein Jahr nach Spanien. It can mean "to work", as in "operate properly": Geht dein Computer jetzt wieder? It can mean "to be available, to have time": ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible