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45

„Sprengen“ ist ein sehr altes deutsches Wort, das schon im Althochdeutsch geläufig war: ahd. sprengen verbreiten, bespritzen, beflecken (8. Jh.), mhd. sprengen (das Pferd) springen lassen, galoppieren, (be)spritzen, streuen, (mit Farbe) sprenkelnDWDS Dabei ist „sprengen“ das Kausativum von „springen“ (also „springen machen“). Dabei bedeutet „den Rasen ...


36

This is simply a typo. It should be geleitet instead of geeitet. The infinitive is leiten, and in the given context, it means guide or direct. Der Gedanke hat mich geleitet. → The thought has guided me.


33

Ich antworte auf etwas (I reply to something), but Ich beantworte etwas (I answer something). Ich antworte auf Deinen Brief (I reply to your letter) Ich beantworte Deine Frage (I answer your question) In German, both is used equivalently, but you need to make sure to use the correct form (see the auf above).


30

"schaffen" has two meanings: to get something managed, to create, to produce something "geschafft" is the past of the 1st, "geschaffen" is the past of the 2nd


28

Just to add a little further detail and perhaps simplify the other fine answers, think of it this way: "Antworten" is an intransitive verb, not performing direct action upon something and thus needing help to transfer the action either by using an auxiliary word followed by the Accusative case or else simply the Dative case without the auxiliary word. "...


27

Technically, möchte is the subjunctive II (Konjunktiv II) of mögen. However, mögen is special, as it changes in a different way than other verbs do when put into the subjuncitve mood: While with most verbs, the subjunctive II mainly conveys the irrealis (i.e., that whatever is described, is not real), mögen changes its meaning from to like (and some others) ...


27

Yes. A common small-talk topic is “Wohin fahrt ihr dieses Jahr in den Urlaub?” and it is perfectly ok to answer “Wir fahren nach Island” even if you have your flight tickets booked already. Same holds, of course, for London and Paris.


26

These words mean the same thing ("to sweep", "to clean dryly with a broom"), but are used in different regions. Kehren (or variants thereof, such as zusammenkehren) can mostly be heard in southern Germany and Austria, whereas fegen is commonly used in the North. Oddly enough, the Swiss say wischen for "to sweep", which a German would (mis-)understand as "...


26

„Reden“ und „sprechen“ beziehen sich auf unterschiedliche Aspekte der Sprachproduktion. „Sprechen“ beschreibt das Vermögen des Menschen, Sprache zu produzieren, und den Vorgang der Sprachproduktion an sich: Jemand kann nicht sprechen, jemand spricht schnell oder laut, jemand spricht schlecht Deutsch usw. „Sprechen“ ist eine psychophysische Fähigkeit wie ...


24

sich freuen auf is used when you are looking forward to something, i.e. in an anticipatory context: Ich freue mich auf die Sommerferien! / Ich freue mich auf deinen Besuch. (future event) sich freuen über is used when you are excited about something, e.g. a gift or present or a general event. Ich freue mich über die Beförderung! / Ich freue mich über ...


24

It's just a matter of style; the meaning is the same. In everyday spoken German you say "aufmachen", in written or higher-register German you say or write "öffnen".


24

There is a gradual development from the Germanic and Old High Germangeban in the meaning of to give to the peculiar abstract usage es gibt which only occured in New High German. There is quite an elaborate essay on almost all meanings and their etymology of geben in Grimm's dictionary. It would be beyond the scope of an answer here to fully translate this ...


23

Well, tell has a few differing meanings and depending on what you're going to express, you need to translate differently. Erzählen is to tell a story or to tell a joke, verraten is to tell a secret, and sagen is simply to say as in die Wahrheit sagen (to tell the truth). Actually, this is general reference and all these information are given in ...


22

Yes, it's definitely used when making reference to a telephone call or similar: Wann hören wir uns wieder? Auf Wiederhören, bis zum nächsten Mal.


22

Welcome to the wonderful world of german separable verb prefixes :-) "Tempel ein" isn't a phrase but the result of separating the verb's prefix from the main part of the verb. In your examples, the complete verb is "einführen" resp. "eindringen". In both cases, you can separate the prefix "ein-" from the rest of the verb; and the difficult thing is that the ...


22

Das gibt es auch bei anderen Dialekten: Der Schwabe schwäbelt. Der Sachse sächselt.


21

In his novel A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, Mark Twain wrote Whenever the literary German dives into a sentence, that is the last you are going to see of him till he emerges on the other side of his Atlantic with his verb in his mouth. A little bit of hyperbole there, but Twain has a point. So how do we conference interpreters handle the ...


21

I think it makes more sense to look at it the other way round: The Verb actually is "aufstehen". The separation of the prefix in certain contexts happens because it's a "trennbares Verb" (separable verb). When used in a main clause, the prefix moves to the end of the clause. In a dependent clause it doesn't. Since what you have in your example is a ...


21

This construction is usually called "predicative nominative" ("prädikativer Nominativ", "Gleichsetzungsnominativ"), rather than "nominative object". There are a couple of verbs that have it, in particular "sein", "werden", "heißen", and "bleiben", and some more verbs where the predicative nominative is connected by "als", such as "gelten", "sich fühlen", "...


20

Das ist wieder richtig typisch. Natürlich ist es immer schöner, die deutsche Entsprechung zu benutzen, aber eben auch nur, wenn diese das Gleiche bedeutet. Das Verb liken bezieht sich lediglich auf das Drücken des Like-Buttons. Mag sein, dass das mögen voraussetzt, aber wenn man sich genau und unmissverständlich ausdrücken will, ist das Wort liken richtig. ...


20

Etwas verhindern is impersonal and quite strong. Wenn ich etwas verhindere, then it won't happen. Jemanden daran hindern, etwas zu tun means something like prevent somebody from doing something. So you know who does it, and you don’t want him to do it. It’s as strong as verhindern, but if I prevent Hans from doing something, Max could do it instead. This ...


19

Heiraten bedeutet eine Ehe eingehen. Man ist also entweder Braut oder Bräutigam. Sich vermählen ist ein Synonym zu heiraten, in meinem Verständnis formaler und definitiv seltener verwendet. Trauen bedeutet nicht, dass man selbst den Bund der Ehe eingeht, sondern jemanden ehelich verbindet. Der Pastor traut das Ehepaar. Entsprechend ist das Äquivalent ...


19

A Google search gave me some information which motivated me to hear the song again and I perceived an interesting fact which I’ve never recognized before. I should listen more carefully to songs in future. There is a wordplay (if it's a good one or not, you have to decide on your own). The second to last repetition says: Willst du bis zum Tod der Scheide ...


19

Strictly speaking, welche möchte Sie lieber? would mean something like which one likes you better? Meaning Sie would be the object of mögen, and welche the subject. Without any more context I would say that it was indeed a typo, the construction would only work in certain situations (in this case welche would have to refer to a previously mentioned ...


19

The verb is, in its infinitive form (the form you need to look it up in a dictionary): to offer = anbieten Like in I want to offer you a drink. Ich möchte dir ein Getränk anbieten. The form for Perfekt, as you correctly found out, is: angeboten I did offer you a drink. Ich habe dir ein Getränk angeboten. But this verb is a separable verb....


18

Liken Dies ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür, wie kommerzialisierte (sic) Sprache (hier initiiert von Facebook) versucht, sich in der deutschen Umgangssprache einzunisten. Bislang existiert dieser Neologismus allerdings nur in der Szenesprache und dort hauptsächlich im Netzjargon. Deshalb ist es auch kaum verwunderlich, dass es keine grammatikalischen Regeln zur ...


18

"Müssen" in German can also imply direction - the usage you are expecting is as auxiliary verb, like "können", "dürfen", "sollen": Etwas tun müssen Gehen müssen But you may use it without any verb to suggest movement without specifying the form (going, driving, flying, whatever) because it is important to be there, not how you got there. Ich muss ...


18

There are around 200 irregular verbs in German (unregelmäßige Verben or starke Verben) and they usually have changes within their roots only for personal pronouns du and er/sie/es. That's probably the reason why you normally find the conjugation for 2nd- and 3rd-person pronouns only. Now, whether an exact rule exists or not, there are actually 5 "categories" ...


18

I checked some german banks which offer an upgrade for their accounts. Clicking these links, you get a webpage with a more legal phrasing, where the bank itself uses the word "wechseln", so you could write in your e-mail something like this: Ich möchte von meinem Basic-Konto zu Ihrem Premium-Kontomodell wechseln.


18

As pointed out in Kilian's answer, the "auf" prefix here refers to opening something. It does, however, not negate the pre-ixed word in general (e.g. as opposed to how "to lock"/"to unlock" work in English). Rather than that, the pair with explicit prefixes in German is "zusperren"/"aufsperren". In there, "auf" has the aforementioned meaning of opening ...


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