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-1

Der Hund der kacken laufen gelassen werden hätte können, hätte spazieren geführt werden müssen.


1

It may be helpful to note that the common parts of a German sentence, like the Prädikat or the Subjekt, don't have to consist of one word only. A Prädikat has to contain a finite verb form, but it can contain additional elements, too. For example, in Ich lese ein Buch. the Prädikat happens to be just the word "lese". But in Ich möchte ein Buch ...


6

Both versions are possible: Ich sagte zu mir selbst: »Mach dir nicht zu viel aus dem Pfiff.« Ich sagte zu mir selbst, dass ich mir nicht zu viel aus dem Pfiff machen sollte. I think #1 sounds better, because direct speech always sounds more vivid and alive than indirect speech. Also consider another begin: Ich dachte mir: »Mach dir nicht zu viel aus dem ...


5

saugen Engl: to suckle, to suck You need a tube that is connected at one end to a chamber with a pressure that is lower than on the other end of the tube. Then this lower pressure will cause fluids (liquids and gasses) to move into the chamber where the lower pressure is. This is the principle of a »Staubsauger« (vacuum cleaner) and of a »Saugpumpe« (lift ...


5

saugen is used if there's an undertow (der Sog) lutschen means to put something in your mouth for a prolonged time and using your tongue Examples: Einen Bonbon lutschen Lutsch meinen Schwanz (col. vulg. suck my dick) Das lutscht! (that sucks!; likely to be literally translated from the English expression) Den Boden saugen (to vacuum) Am Strohhalm saugen An ...


4

As said by @HalvarF, there are actually four verbs in the phrase. It's colloquial speech, trying to ask a favour and showing some blush with leaving open a possibility that the request might be denied. Let's get to the meaning Kann ich im Laufe der Woche kommen ? and Kann ich mir die ausleihen ? is concatenated to Kann ich mir die im Laufe der Woche ...


1

First, Ich hingegange dort, is impossible. You're thinking of the past participle hingegangen which is not declined (so not hingegange) and always used with a helping verb. In German the simple past would be Ich ging dort hin. The verb hingehen is irregular so forming the simple past tense doesn't follow the same rules as regular verbs. (There's a whole deal ...


1

German and English verb tenses do not match. Not at all. English has a very convoluted system of telling the order of events and whether they stop or continue or are timeless. German on the other hand only ever tells apart non-past —simple tenses— and past —Perfekt tenses—. All the other differences of German tenses and moods tell about how much of a fact ...


3

In German (like in English) some verb forms (like the Perfekt in your example) consist of a helping verb (sein = be, haben = have) and a participle (a lot of them start with or contain the syllable "ge", like "hinGEgangen"). You can compare this to "I have (helping verb) gone (participle) there", for example. If you are looking ...


5

Some concepts from English can be applied to German, some can't. In this case, your confusion is the result of the English verb form present continuous: "I am going", "You are going", "Are you going?". This form just doesn't exist in German, so it isn't used in questions, either. So instead normal present tense is used: "...


2

Unlike English, German does not need an auxiliary verb to form a question. German also does not have a continous form constructed using to be + present participle. This means that there are two cases where English uses an auxiliary verb but German does not. So it's correct that Are you going? translates to Gehst/Fährst du? Note that are, if translated, ...


3

Both are from the Nebensatz point of view pretty right (just that it's "gegangen bin" ("geht" is Präsens): Als ich ein Kind war, hat mein Vater mir viele Märchen, bevor ich ins Bett gegangen bin, erzählt. Als ich ein Kind war, hat mein Vater mir viele Märchen erzählt, bevor ich ins Bett gegangen bin. The second one is more readable. ...


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