7

I'm inclined to answer negatively as far as Standard German is concerned. I know you mentioned Northern Germany, but then again your recording is definitely Standard German. German vowel contrasts combine length and tenseness: [i: ɪ] [y: ʏ] [u: ʊ] [o: ɔ] and finally [e: ɛ], [ø: œ].* Closed tensed long [e:] and open untensed short [ɛ] are clearly distinct, ...


6

Cornelsen is a patronymic name as for example Petersen = Peters Sohn = son of Peter. Cornelsen is derived from the first name Cornelius, which is of Latin origin and has similar accentuation of the e.


6

The rule of thumb about double consonants applies to consonants within the same morpheme. So "Gen" sounds a long e, and so does "Gentechnik", because the n and t belong to different parts of the word, but "Gent" has a short e. Similarly, "raten" has a long a and "Ratten" a short one, because the stem of the verb is rat- and of the noun, Ratt- (or perhaps "...


5

Thankfully, Swiss Radio and Television (Schweizer Radio und Fernsehen, SRF) have audio and video news available online. These news broadcasts are often spoken in Swiss standard German rather than in Swiss dialects. I opened the first article I saw and listened in until I heard a word that would be written with ß in German. Well, to be honest, I waited for ...


4

The word schreiben has a so called Reduktionssilbe. In such syllables, the Schwa is often reduced or even deleted in everyday speech. reduced Schwa: -e, -em, -es, -est reduced Tiefschwa: -er, -ern, -ert, -erst no Schwa at all: -en, -el, -eln, -elt, -elst Especially Southern speakers often delete the Schwa and replace the Tiefschwa with a. Swiss German ...


2

There are two different pronunciations for »schreiben« but non of them contains a vowel in its last syllable. Both contain a vocalized consonant. The two variations are: [ˈʃʀaɪ̯bn̩] [ˈʃʀaɪ̯bm̩] When ever the consonant before an unstressed »∙en« at the end of a word is a stop-consonant, then the syllable is pronounced with a vocalized [n]. In some cases ...


1

Although I know it's not always the most accurate resource, the Wikipedia article on Swiss Standard German says: The Swiss keyboard layout has no ß key, nor does it have the capital umlaut keys Ä, Ö and Ü. This dates back to mechanical typewriters that had the French diacritical marks letters on these keys to allow the Swiss to write French on a ...


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