33

In addition to guidot's answer, it might be helpful to note that "Freigabeberechtigungen" is more specific than "permission". A general "permission" would be a "Berechtigung" or an "Erlaubnis" (the difference between those two would probably warrant its own question). A compositum with "...berechtigung&...


23

"Antreten" doesn't mean "to compete" directly. The meaning in this context is more like "to enter (a competition)", "to show up (for a match)", "to step up (to the opponent)" or "to report (for taking an exam)". It might help to note that having a group of soldiers to form up is called "...


23

If used verbatim, "wittern" refers more to detecting a smell over a distance. A similar English expression would be "to get wind of something", which also includes the idea of the wind or the air transporting the smell to the nose. "Riechen" is more general. If you for example take a bar of soap in your hand and smell at it, you'...


17

I'm pretty sure the differences are not that subtle and you could probably resolve this with a dictionary. But kaufen is "to buy", money changes hands and you take the item home in your car. In this context, nehmen is something you might use with a server at a restaurant, who will then bring the item for you to consume on the spot and then pay. In ...


14

"Beginner" ist eigentlich kein gebräuchliches deutsches Wort, ich würde das nicht benutzen, außer wenn ich über eine bestimmte Hamburger Hip-Hop-Gruppe spreche, die "Beginner" heißt (früher: "Absolute Beginner"). Es gibt das Verb "beginnen" und auch ein entsprechendes englisches Wort, deshalb wird dich vermutlich jeder ...


10

The anwer guidot gave, already stated that “there is no single word order in German”, and that's why it is so important that the flexion endings clarify the relation. The emphasis part seems not quite correct to me. As it is usually hard to understand emphasis from telling “the rules” alone, here two realistic Q&A examples to help you understand: Q: ...


9

The words lachen ("to laugh") and lächeln ("to smile") are close etymological relatives. This is the reason of them being so close in spelling and pronounciation. lächeln is derived from lachen, it is a diminutive form of lachen. While in German the noun diminutive is formed by adding the ending -lein and potentially transforming the core ...


9

Bei der beschriebenen Operation handelt es sich um den Vorgang, Daten, die in zahlreichen Formen vorliegen können, in eine einheitliche Form zu bringen. Ein solcher Prozess wird im Allgemeinen Normalisierung genannt. Das drückt freilich nicht aus, was nun konkret in deinem Fall geschieht, sondern eher die Intention, die Textbestandteile in eine einheitliche, ...


9

Although the word Abendbrot (literally: "evening bread") is suggesting that actually bread is being eaten, Abendessen and Abendbrot do not differ in what they are referring to, as far as I know - with both notions referring to the meal at the end of the day, "dinner". (Where I come from - Saxony, a region, where Abendbrot is the standard ...


9

"Nehmen" is what you use when you're in a restaurant or a shop, to either order something (in a restaurant, café, bakery, ... ) or to tell someone what you have decided to buy. The English equivalent is often "to have" or "to take". Im Café: Carla, nimmst du Kaffee oder Tee? (zur Bedienung:) Ich nehme eine Tasse Kaffee. In der ...


8

Why does “Freigabeberechtigungen” translate to “Permissions” That you encountered the word in an Outlook e-mail explains it. Microsoft’s German translations are infamous for their ponderous language with lots of compound words used in weird and sometimes at least slightly wrong contexts. “Freigabeberechtigung” is a great example. It’s a compound of “...


7

I took a closer look and the word seems to have a Rotwelsch origin. Klabacha - baufälliges, verwahrlostes Haus meaning "dilapidated shabby house" Original answer: There are several roughly similar sounding words. But the most likely is Kabache what means "little/primitive hut" or "pub". pronunciation (and some more ...


7

Translation We destroyed the joy of the children as they received everything they wanted. Explanation The use of bekommen here is perfectly fine and it exclusively means to get or to receive. The real difficulty that causes the confusion is indem. Because indem is a subclause-introducing conjunction in German, the subject of the subclause can be different ...


7

Der "Bärendienst" ist schon genau der richtige Ausdruck. jemandem einen Bärendienst erweisen/leisten (in guter Absicht etwas tun, was einem anderen, zu dessen Nutzen es gedacht war, schadet; vielleicht nach der Fabel „Der Bär und der Gartenliebhaber“ von La Fontaine, in der der Bär diensteifrig eine Fliege von der Nase des Gärtners verscheucht, ...


7

Just like in English, or every language really, there are different jargons in German. I am using the term jargon here to mean something like "a shared language of specific, well-defined terms among a community of professionals". Words can mean different things in different jargons. For example, in Stack Overflow jargon, a "poster" is the ...


6

"Lieblingskunst" is not wrong, but most people would probably not use it because "Kunst" is such a vague word. Was ist deine Lieblingskunst? ... would probably prompt the question "Was meinst du damit?", or if not, the answer would probably be something like "music", "painting" or "tightrope walking&...


6

Sympathie affection, fondness; goodwill You sentence seems to come from the context of sex workers offering services in advertisements. There, küssen bei Sympathie means that the prostitute is willing to kiss you if (s)he feels comfortable with you and/or likes you and/or you appear well-groomed and "clean". Here is a Spiegel article that uses the ...


6

I'm afraid, you received debatable information. Belasten is correct without reasonable doubt (see, e.g. DWDS, meaning 2) and this does not restrict to cards but covers all types of accounts as well; it has however an accountant flavour and may be misinterpreted or not fully understood by any "insert non-financial non-expert group of choice". Only ...


6

"Entwickelt" is an adjective which is derived from a verb. And this verb can be connected with the suffix "weiter". So someone or something can "sich weiterentwickeln". It works with many other verbs like "weiterbilden". It could be a reason to that. I must also point out to the intonation here; if you would put "...


6

My sister is a nurse. She got her diploma in the middle of the 1980ies (somewhen between 1983 and 1985), and I always found it odd that she is the Schwester for only me, but Krankenschwester for everybody, and I always found it odd, that her male colleagues are not called Krankenbruder. The official term for her profession is »Diplompfleger« or »...


6

Beide Möglichkeiten sind grammatisch korrekt und sie sind gutes Deutsch. Es gibt daran nichts auszusetzen. Man kann beide Varianten in dieser Situation verwenden.


5

I assume that the problem is that, while the sentences feel roughly synonymous, the word order is different. The interesting part of the sentences is the one I put in square brackets, the so-called Mittelfeld (Wikipedia). Wir haben [ den Stuhl zur Schwester ] gebracht. Wir haben [ der Schwester den Stuhl ] gebracht. While it is true that German word order ...


5

jemandem über den Mund fahren (colloquial, casual) rudely interrupt jemanden unterbrechen interrupt / cut someone off jemanden nicht ausreden lassen not letting someone finish jemanden nicht zu Wort kommen lassen not letting someone have a say example: Er hat ihn andauernd unterbrochen und nie zu Wort kommen lassen. He constantly interrupted him ...


5

I think all terms have near exact equivalents in English, in that the general English translations can be used to describe a purchase, emphasizing different aspects of of buying something. The European cultures are remarkably similar, which is reflected in the similar semantics of even unrelated words in the different languages. "Kaufen": To buy ...


5

I'm afraid, that this is either sloppy phrasing or an attempt to sound impressive. It seems you got the permission to see someone's else calendar (or even schedule events in it), and while the person granting you that access needs a privilege like Freigabeerlaubnis, you just got a simple Erlaubnis. Things may be more complicated, if you also received the ...


4

There is no single order in German. Both sentences are possible, depending on what was talked about earlier. (I would guess, that this is more likely to be Schwester, so the second example is then more appropriate, since it mentions Schwester early giving it more emphasis.)


4

Glatteis oder Speiseeis? Zuerst wäre zu klären, ob Ihre Freundin tatsächlich über die Wettervorhersage spricht (z. B. von Schnee, Hagel, Glatteis). Ohne weiteren Kontext würde ich die Aussage Das Eis ist angesagt. so verstehen, dass es um irgendein Speiseeis gehe, das sehr begehrt ist. Das liegt zum einen daran, dass das Eis hier mit Artikel verwendet wird,...


4

"Alles passt" ist less specific, it basically means "everything is good" in a very general sense. You could use it in a restaurant when the waiter asks you if everything is ok, you could use it as an answer to "wie geht's?". It's really universal. Just remember that it's quite informal. This also means that if you say "mein ...


4

First, keep in mind that German and English are different languages; not only different word for word, but different phrases are often handled differently. While "news" and Nachrichten have roughly the same meaning and usage, they are not really the same, so it's best to learn Nachricht as a different word with it's own meanings which don't always ...


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