64

German compound nouns are often made fun of because of their length. To nonspeakers, they look monstrous and incomprehensible. But in reality, they are quite simple. There's always at least two parts, with the first part determining the second and the second part being a noun. Verkehrsunfall: accident in traffic Nasenspray: spray for nose ...


52

Tofros answer is not wrong, but imho there is a different angle to it. First of all "Aldää" is phonetic spelling for "Alter". This is German slang. It used to be teenage slang but by now it's pretty much general slang since the teenagers from back then are now 30+ and still use it. In your example it is used as a form of adress. The translation to "Whazzup?...


50

Do people actually use the word “kaputt” in conversation? It is definitely the preferred word used by native speakers to say that something is broken in spoken language (both formal and informal). I think in 99% of all cases a native speaker would use the word "kaputt" to say that some thing is defect. This is also true for informal written language (such ...


47

TL;DR That's the wrong literal translation. Note that Auffassung is female, i.e. die Auffassung. Here it's in the genitive case (der Auffassung). More literal translations would thus be: I am of the opinion I am of the understanding which make more sense. More detailed explanation German nouns may change their article depending on the grammatical case. ...


46

Since montags is an adverb and montäglich an adjective, they cannot simply be alternatives for each other. In fact, montäglich is only rarely used adverbially. Die Rufe nach „Widerstand“ […] hallen seit nunmehr fast einem Jahr montäglich durch die Straßen der Dresdner Altstadt. (1) Most of the time, is used attributively. Ob in der S-Bahn, an der Kasse ...


41

This might not be a mistake, but very deliberately done. As comrades of war the general says du and ihr to his fellows. But at the very end of his speech, he wants to make clear that this is over and he switches to the normal Anrede of civil life, which would be Sie, and that will be used hereafter.


40

German has a similar “going flat” metaphor, only instead of soda or a chemical reaction, we refer to deflating balloons: ... die Luft raus... It probably works better in your second example: Das Spiel war zuerst spannend, aber dann war irgendwie die Luft raus.“ But it can also be used for relationships like in your first example: Über die Jahre ...


37

Absolutely; an adult is still someone’s Kind in exactly the same way as in English. Just two examples I quickly found via a web search: Vor allem diese sonderbare Hilflosigkeit, wenn die eigenen Kinder fordern, dass man ihnen als Erwachsene auf Augenhöhe begegnen soll … (Kester Schlenz, Stern) Meine erwachsenen Kinder vertragen sich einfach nicht (...


37

Schnorrbrief is the combination of Schnorrer (or from the verb schnorren) and Brief (letter). Schnorrer is also explained in the English Wikipedia: Schnorrer (שנאָרער; also spelled shnorrer) is a Yiddish term meaning "beggar" or "sponger".1 The word Schnorrer also occurs in German to describe a freeloader who frequently asks for little things, like ...


36

(Hinweis: Für eine deutsche Antwort, siehe hier.) I don't think there is much of a difference. Perhaps jetzt is more often used in spoken language, while nun is more often written than spoken, although there may well be regional differences. If you must make a difference: jetzt means "right now, this instant" where the meaning of nun is closer to "...


36

kein Zugang – no access kein Zutritt – no entry Kein Zugang means you can not access or reach a certain target this way – but it does not imply that it is forbidden for you to go there. Kein Zutritt means it is forbidden. Kein Zugang zum Messegelände means: you cannot reach the Messegelände on this way. Kein Zutritt zum Messegelände means: you ...


35

The German verb has to come second. The first position can be filled with whatever. Thus the phrase "gibt es" can totally be part of statements Es gibt in Berlin gute Bäcker. In Berlin gibt es gute Bäcker. As the other answer already mentions, "Gibt es" is the order you'll find in questions. Gibt es in Berlin gute Bäcker? AND it can ...


34

Most commonly this is referred to as Tresorsturzopferclownausrutschbananenvorfall Which translate to incident related to a banana on which the clown, that is victim of a falling safe, is slipping


33

Fräulein is not typically used any more. In fact, a lot of women can become quite upset if addressed this way. (Quite some time ago it described an unmarried woman, completely independent of her age). You would use Mädchen for children and every time you wish to point to the fact that they are minors. After that, it would either be junge Frau or simply Frau....


33

Generally, I – as a German – would say that things that will happen in future are composed with ab. Ab morgen gehe ich arbeiten. Things that began in the past but span to the present are composed with seit. Seit gestern gehe ich arbeiten.


33

Let me start with your last question concerning how it works. "Wir über uns" is an ellipsis of something like "Wir berichten über uns" or "Hier schreiben wir etwas über uns". Actually, I find the German version to be more precise than the English "About us", for the personal pronoun wir exactly specifies that we, and not others, say something about ...


32

Generally, if 'hier', 'da' and 'dort' are used to designate place of varying distance, then - 'hier' refers to closest proximity - 'da' refers to a larger distance from the speaker - 'dort' indicates largest distance. Imagine you talk to someone within an interesting park full of interesting features. 'Hier stand die alte Mauer der Stadt, da war der ...


32

Note that the German word Hunger is a noun. Just as you'd not say I am hunger in English, you most likely would not say I am hunger in German. Ich bin hungrig is legal and works, but is less common than Ich habe Hunger. The same goes for being thirsty: Ich habe Durst Ich bin durstig Both of the above are valid but the former is far more common.


29

The word "Männergrippe" is used mockingly by women who perceive that men complain and whinge too much when they have a flu or simply a cold. The expression is not exclusively German, you can find "man flu" in English language dictionaries: man flu [..] (informal, humorous) a cold or similar minor illness that a man catches and treats as if it ...


28

Mir ist beides recht.  I'm OK with both. That's what immediately comes to mind (in both languages – I don't care doesn't strike me as a particularly polite statement. Further alternatives: Wie du möchtest/wie Sie möchten.  As you like. Ich habe keine Präferenzen.  I have no preference.


27

I don't think that what you found is really contradictory at all. The only thing I believe should be clarified is the distinction "formal" vs. "colloquial." Depending on your understanding of "colloquial," I feel this might perhaps lead somewhat astray. "Kunststoff" is clearly the more technical term of the two. Your chemistry teacher would teach you about ...


27

Like πάντα ῥεῖ wrote, "Männergrippe" is not a real illness but a joke. This joke bases on the assumption, men are more histrionics if they get ill than women. In some comedy the man is shown helpless and whining because he has a cold. The woman instead organizes whole household, children and her job with a broken leg. So the use of "Männergrippe" let you ...


27

I think that comment you cite is just wrong in the claim "spazieren" on the other hand can mean you are walking in a silly and affected manner, and it is usually used in a situation which appears humorous in some way or other. The example with the peacock makes me believe that it probably mixes up spazieren with stolzieren (to flounce, to strut). Still, ...


26

A "Petze" is a colloquial word that describes someone who "rats out" someone else. Dict.cc translates it as "telltale" or "snitch". In German, the noun "Petze" or the verb "petzen/verpetzen" are mostly used by children, because it is a more childlike way to say "verraten" (betray). An exemplary use of the word in Kindergarden or school would be that a ...


26

The generally accepted, most common form of address for a female is "Frau". But Germans also do use Madame as a form of address. Although not nearly as often as the neutral default "Frau". Using Madame is more often heard than many people seem to notice. It is not really 'unusual', or 'very rare' but pales in absolute frequency to "Frau". Not least because ...


25

The way I always explain it is that Menschen is shifted toward human while Leute is shifted toward a colloquial use of people... maybe a bit like folk(s). Consequently, Leute is also fine if you're going down the derogatory route but it is not part of the word per se. Let's look at some examples now. If you talk about your last night out and you describe ...


25

Generally speaking - no. I would only use this greeting in very informal situations, and the minimum requirement would be that I say "Du" to the other person. Nowadays, what is considered acceptable varies a lot with company culture - this also goes for universities/individual professors - so there is no hard and fast rule here. But generally speaking, you ...


24

das Mädchen (neuter) »Das Mädchen« is the historical diminutive of »Die Maid«. »Die Maid« has the same etymologic root as the english word »the maiden« and has a very similar meaning. A Maid was a young woman, often meant as sexually mature, but still being a virgin. A small (younger) Maid was a Maid-chen, which was always written as Mädchen. So, a Mädchen ...


24

For me, "Viergruppe" sounds simply wrong, so I consider it a typo in the sources, you found. As mentioned in the linked answer compositions of nouns in German may have a "Fugenlaut". For combinations of numbers and other nouns this is indeed the Fugenlaut "-er-", e. g. Dreiergruppe Vierergruppe Fünfergruppe and so on.


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