Hubert Schölnast
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Using gender specific pronouns for inanimate objects
70 votes

Yes, gender applies to pronouns as well. It is a grammatical feature, not a biological. Correct: Ich habe meine Tasche gesucht, aber ich habe sie nicht gefunden. Grammatical gender in English exists ...

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Do native speakers use ZVE or CPU?
63 votes

I am a computer scientist, working in this environment in different roles since the early 1990ies, and I never before have heard the abbreviation ZVE. I even never before have heard the term "zentrale ...

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Low German, Upper German, Bavarian ... Where are these dialects spoken?
62 votes

When you talk about geographic borders of dialects, you talk about isoglosses. What is an isogloss? An isogloss is a geographic boundary between two linguistic features. One famous example of such an ...

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Is Bavarian the 80th most spoken "language" in the world?
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56 votes

I don't want to discuss the difference between languages and dialects. German is a pluricentric language, which means, that there is not "a" single German. Through all the centuries from proto German ...

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Germans call glucose grape sugar? Origins for this if so?
54 votes

First the correct translations: "Die Traube" = "bunch of berries", "bunch of grapes" or "cluster" "Die Weintraube" = "bunch of grapes" or "grape" "grape" = "die Weinbeere" (the single berry) or "...

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Is German a VO language or an OV language?
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53 votes

English is a SVO language. SVO means: Subject, Verb, Object(s) in exactly this order. But English is the only Germanic language with this word order. German and all other Germanic languages (Dutch, ...

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If »Geld« is neuter, then why not »genuges Geld«?
Accepted answer
49 votes

In this sentence the word »genug« (enough) does not describe a property of »Geld« (money). You can test this when you try to use this word as an attribute in a nominal phrase that is used as subject ...

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Polite alternatives to "Grüß Gott"?
48 votes

Ich hoffe, es ist in Ordnung, wenn ich auf Deutsch antworte, denn es ist meine Muttersprache, und darin kann ich mich besser ausdrücken. Grüß Gott Ich bin ein Atheist und ich lebe in Wien. Ich mag ...

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Why does "Leidenschaft" mean "passion" while "leiden" means "to suffer"?
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46 votes

There is a very interesting fact about »leiden«, »leid«, »Leid«, »leidlich«, »leider«, »erleiden«, »Beileid«, »beleidigen«, »Leidenschaft« and similar words: They do not derive from the same root. ...

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What is the appropriate German phrase for letting you pass crowded areas?
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41 votes

Most people just say Entschuldigung which just means "excuse me" or "sorry". Sometimes you hear just the colloquial shortened version Tschuldign which sometimes gets condensed to even more ...

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How would you say, "I speak a little bit German"?
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41 votes

There exist three ways of how to use the adjective wenig in German: As an attribute of a noun: A small amount of something In diesem Glas ist wenig Wasser. In this glass is little water. ...

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Why do “Meer” and “See” have swapped meanings from their Dutch counterparts?
39 votes

The German feminine noun "die See" doesn't mean English "lake" or Dutch "meer". Here are the correct translations: German English Dutch das Meer the sea de zee die See ...

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How do you say “To whom it may concern” in German?
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39 votes

You are right. The correct translation of Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren is (dear) ladies and gentlemen So, »to whom it may concern« seems not to match with »Sehr geehrte Damen und Herren«. ...

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stressing of "umfahren" in German dialects
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35 votes

This is not a matter of regional variations of pronunciation. This is pronounced everywhere the same. But we are talking here about two distinct verbs, one of them is separable, the other not, which ...

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Is German on social media very distinct from standard German?
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34 votes

I grew up near Graz, in the south-east of Austria. The first language that I learned when I was a little child was the local dialect. This dialect has no genitive case, dative and accusative case are ...

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What’s the difference between “Ich habe dich lieb” and “Ich liebe dich”?
34 votes

As far as I know, in English you have these gradations, ordered from weak to strong (I’m a German native speaker, so I’m not absolutely sure if there are more): I like you. I love you. In ...

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Difference between "jail" and "prison" in German
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33 votes

The building is the same in both cases. It is called »Gefängnis« as you already know. But the kind of residence has different names: Untersuchungshaft or U-Haft imprisonment on remand When you are ...

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What's the German expression for 'In a nutshell'
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32 votes

Posible translations for »in a nutshell« are: in (aller) Kürze zusammengefasst kurz gefasst kurz und bündig (plus a few more) There is no term containing the German word »Nussschale« that ...

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How can I translate the adverb "doch" in sentences?
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32 votes

Die deutsche Sprache enthält eine Wortart, die es in der englischen gar nicht gibt, und die in anderen Sprachen auch nur selten zu finden ist: Modalpartikel (Das fett hervorgehobene »gar« im ersten ...

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How do I say "quirky" in German without sounding derogatory?
31 votes

All languages have words that are unique and hard to translate, because most other languages don't have a perfect matching translation for it. The German word Gemütlichkeit is one of them. You can ...

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Could someone explain how to form the genitive partitive in German? (Einer meiner wording)
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29 votes

männlich: Nominativ Einer meiner Söhne ist im Haus. One of my sons is in the house. Genitiv Das ist das Haus eines meiner Söhne. This is the house of one of my sons. Dativ Dieses ...

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Is there any difference between "malen" and "zeichnen"?
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28 votes

zeichnen zeichnen = to draw You use a pen or pencil and draw lines on paper or other flat and smooth surfaces. If you want to fill areas, you have to hatch those areas (to hatch = schraffieren). ...

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Was ist der Unterschied zwischen "reden" und "sprechen"?
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27 votes

„Reden“ und „sprechen“ beziehen sich auf unterschiedliche Aspekte der Sprachproduktion. „Sprechen“ beschreibt das Vermögen des Menschen, Sprache zu produzieren, und den Vorgang der Sprachproduktion ...

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Can a German sentence have two subjects?
25 votes

Short answer: No Long answer: These are the parts of this sentence: die Wahrnehmung von Gerüchen Subjekt (subject) Note, that neither Wahrnehmung nor Gerüchen are subjects. The whole nominal group ...

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How to refer to a woman based on her age?
24 votes

das Mädchen (neuter) »Das Mädchen« is the historical diminutive of »Die Maid«. »Die Maid« has the same etymologic root as the english word »the maiden« and has a very similar meaning. A Maid was a ...

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Why do we use the dative case even when the object isn't receiving anything?
Accepted answer
23 votes

Blut im Auge (blood in the eye) Where is the blood? - In the eye. Mein Schlüssel ist im Auto. (My key is in the car.) Where is the key? - In the car. In both cases you are asking with "where" ...

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"Nein" vs "nee", is there any difference?
23 votes

If you want to learn German, then you learn standard German, which will be understood in all countries where German is spoken. But »nee« is not a standard-German word. It is a dialect word. »Nee« is ...

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How difficult is Mozart’s German for language learners?
23 votes

Mozart's German Mozart himself didn't write any of the texts (libretti) of his operas. He "only" wrote the music after a given text. And more than 70% of his operas are in Italian language (one, ...

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Was genau ist ein "Teutonismus"?
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23 votes

Sprach-Varietäten Ebenso wenig wie es nicht eine einzige englische Sprache gibt, gibt es auch nicht eine einzige deutsche Sprache. Bei der englischen Sprache unterscheidet man zwei große ...

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Meaning of asozial in German language
22 votes

The German word »asozial« means in English anti social = against the needs and rights of the society People who behave asozial violate basic rights of other people. A person who plays loud music in ...

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