phipsgabler
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Is beeilen always a reflexive verb?
23 votes

Yes, beeilen is always reflexive in modern usage. You cannot say *er beeilte or *sie beeilte ihn. The counterexample you gave is a different word: herbeieilen. This consists of the intransitive verb ...

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Role of “eines Besseren” in a sentence
15 votes

The other answer IMHO fails to emphasize that jemanden eines Besseren belehren is a highly idiomatic phrase, with the compound meaning of being corrected or informed about a misconception. It's a ...

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Why "eine Kind" and not "ein Kind"?
14 votes

Eine is not an article here, but behaves like an adjective (or numeral) meaning "one", since dieses already fulfills the article role. Compare: dieses/das/jedes eine Kind -- this/the/each one child ...

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How bad does it sound in German *not* to separate separable verbs?
12 votes

While sounding wrong in 99% of all cases, this style can be validly (though exceptionally) used in what is called Telegrammstil, where you don't split prefixes in order to minimize word count. This ...

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Soll ich "wer" nach "dem" entsprechend deklinieren?
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12 votes

Der Kopf einer solchen Konstruktion richtet sich nach der Funktion im eingebetteten Satz: Stehe zu dem, der liebt. (Subjekt im Nominativ) Stehe zu dem, dessen Liebe du teilhaftig wurdest. (Objekt im ...

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Three verbs in one sentence
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10 votes

"I want to swim" vs. "I want to go swimming" -- same thing. The difference is that strictly spoken in the first, you desire the action itself (as in, "I want to swim, not just only lie in the sun", ...

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Wie viele Vokale gibt es im Deutschen?
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10 votes

Ich wage den Versuch einer Antwort für Monophthonge, und beziehe mich ausschließlich auf Phoneme. Ich verwende den Begriff Gespanntheit für das Merkmal, das einen Vokal von seinem „relativ offenerem ...

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"es" ("it") for a woman
9 votes

This seems to be the case for many western middle German dialekts, mostly along the Rhein, and in some places in Swizerland (thus being Allemanic dialects). This article will contain more ("Dat ...

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Expression of woman sinking in the mud and waving
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9 votes

Googling "im moor sinken winken Frau", I found Siehst Du im Moor die Schwiegermutter winken, wink zurück und lass sie sinken. "When you see your mother in law waving from a bog, wave ...

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How to translate "bias"
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8 votes

Certainly not Voreingenommenheit in the context of probability theory. When talking about estimators, it is common to call unbiased estimators erwartungstreu, and then for biased estimators there is ...

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What is the correct form? Is it "in den Zeiten" or "in der Zeiten"?
8 votes

In, in the nondirectional (temporal) sense of in den Zeiten "in the times", takes the dative case. The datives of die Zeit are der Zeit (Sg) and den Zeiten (Pl). Der Zeiten could be a correct ...

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How can I deal with "Eigennamen" when they conflict with the grammar of the sentence?
7 votes

I'd like to add something to the other answer, since there's more semantic distinctions to it. Proper nouns enjoy a spectrum here, ranging from the same inflective behaviour as common nouns have to ...

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To get something happen
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7 votes

"To get X Y" is a construction expressing that you cause or allow some agent or event affect X with result Y. One German verb that can replace the meaning of "get" here is lassen, which can be used ...

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Maschinelle Suche nach Grundform von Wörtern
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7 votes

Das ist jetzt recht technisch und etwas allgemeiner, aber... was du suchst ist wahrscheinlich ein Stemmer oder Lemmatizer. Gibts zB. als Go-Library (habe ich nur auf die Schnelle ergoogelt, aber mit ...

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Can you say "einander infizieren" as an alternative to anstecken to express the idea of people infecting each other?
6 votes

Yes, you can. In this context, it means the same, but note two things: infizieren, in contrast to anstecken, has a rather "professional" or formal sound to it. It is usually used more in ...

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Subtle meaning and word order differences in German constituent questions
6 votes

First let it be said that this must be dealing mostly with spoken, non (normative) standard speech. (2) is definitely OK and productive in spoken Austrian, but I would never write it (also because ...

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"bei der" as a subordinating conjunction
5 votes

The second clauses you list all refer to different parts of the main clause, resulting in slightly different meaning. Lets replace the main clause by something simpler, for the sake of analysis: Lisa ...

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The location of `nicht` when saying 'don't spit on the floor!' in German
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5 votes

First of all, Sie or du doesn't make a difference here. Now, (1) and (3) are definitely correct and idiomatic. (2) and (4) are in all practical scenarios incorrect, but had their usages in poetic ...

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Why is the h in OHG "riohhan" geminated?
5 votes

The underlying Germanic form was reuk-a, according to Kluge's etymological dictionary. Then, in the beginning of the High German consonant shift, which set apart Old High German from the other ...

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Stress position in German sentences
5 votes

These are indeed joint questions and to be answered interleavingly. Information structure As I have commented, it is not really that "at the end, important (new) information should be placed"...

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Trump sorgte für Empörung mit der Drohung, Soldaten einzusetzen
5 votes

Trump sorgte für Empörung mit der Drohung, Soldaten einzusetzen. Trump sorgte mit der Drohung, Soldaten einzusetzen, für Empörung. Trump sorgte mit der Drohung für Empörung, Soldaten einzusetzen. ...

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How to identify the target of a preposition?
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5 votes

I don't really understand what Google Translate's results have to do with this, but the syntactic answer to the question is: neither. In this case, the prepositional phrase is an (optional) argument ...

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Kann man Präteritum und Perfekt in einem Satz mischen, der sich auf die Vergangenheit bezieht?
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5 votes

In der Verwendung als reine Vergangenheitstempora (das Perfekt hat nämlich noch andere Aspekte!) sind Präteritum und Perfekt semantisch eigentlich komplett austauschbar; somit würde ich Ardoris ...

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Warum "alles" und nicht "allem" in "Deutschland über alles"?
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5 votes

In einer Aufforderung kann eine präpositionale Richtungsangabe eine ausreichend starke Bedeutung bekommen, um ein Imperativ-Verb der Bewegung zu ersetzen, das dann sozusagen elliptisch ergänzt wird. ...

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"kommt es dabei gar nicht an"
5 votes

The basic phrase would be Es kommt nicht auf [die Reihenfolge] an, which as you rightly guessed means that the order doesn't matter, or more literally, that (whatever is talked about) is not ...

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Is the construction »sollen ... sein soll« correct?
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5 votes

It is not really redundant; rather, it is incorrect. I suspect this is a result of editing the sencence. But as your feeling seems to tell you, removing the soll makes it correct: Die Zölle sollen ...

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'Trennbare Verben' that Germans understand?
4 votes

This is more a psycholinguistic question than specifically German. Utterances in all languages contain less information than they theoretically could -- redundancy is more important than compression (...

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hast du schon gerich/krikk/krieg ...?
Accepted answer
4 votes

I think the main point of confusion here is that Bavarian dialects, to which Tyrolian belongs, tend to leave out the ge- prefex from the past participle in many instances*. The verb you looking for ...

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Wie kann man "sich etwas teilen"?
4 votes

Das Verb wird verwirrender, je weiter man darüber nachdenkt :) Ich vermute, dass das Problem daher kommt, dass das Reflexivpronomen und die freie Angabe eines Benefizienten (Dat) im Plural gleich ...

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What is the difference between absteigen and aussteigen
4 votes

Absteigen denotes something where you are getting down, and (probably) comes from horse riding. Besides horses, you use it for "horse-like vehicles" such as bicycles, motor cycles, or perhaps in a ...

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