adhominem
  • Member for 8 years, 7 months
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  • Hamburg, Germany
Grammatical function of “voller”
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7 votes

Voll(er) in this case means "voll von" (full of). The -er is entirely optional, "Sie ist voll Licht" und "Sie ist voller Licht" are identical in meaning. Thus the lack of indication in the ...

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Ursprung der Redewendung "etwas anwerfen / anschmeißen"
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6 votes

Laut DWDS kommt das vom ahd. anawerfan, etwas anwerfen, anstoßen, in Gang bringen (z. Bsp. einen Wagen, einen Baumstamm den Hügel hinunter). Wenn man dasselbe Wort für "werfen" und "stoßen" verwendet, ...

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What's the opposite of "jawohl"?
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6 votes

The opposite of "Jawohl" is "Nein". However, see below. "Jawohl" is more of an acknowledgement ("I have understood and will comply with your request") than an answer to a yes/no question, "Sind Sie ...

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Is "Langenscheidt" a word?
6 votes

"Langenscheidt" refers to a well-known German publisher of foreign language dictionaries and is sometimes used as a generic term for "dictionary". A bit more information about the company: https://en....

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Forming sentences with »nämlich«
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5 votes

Both are correct, however the word "nämlich" implies a strong connection between the two statements. Unless you want to introduce a pause for effect, I would use a comma or a hyphen in this case. ...

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Difference between spüren and fühlen
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4 votes

Yes and no. Fühlen is less reflected, it refers to feeling your own emotions and things directly touching your skin. Spüren is less direct. It can also refer to things touching your skin (though not ...

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Which words or phrases should non-native speakers avoid to prevent unintentional offense?
3 votes

In general: Germans mean what they say, and the polite white lie is - if the lie is identified at all in the first place - seen as insincere. Example: An invitation is an invitation the first time ...

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Using “nach” or “zu” for landmarks and similar
2 votes

Native speaker here. When it comes to movement, I would use the following rules: "nach" only in conjunction with countries, cities, and other such places. "Nach Paris" is correct, "nach Disneyland" ...

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Position of “etwas” in “Kann ich in Berlin etwas kaufen?”
1 votes

Both are grammatically correct, but the emphasis is different, as pointed out by Wrzlprmft. The result is that to me, at least, the two questions are quite different. Kann ich in Berlin etwas ...

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difference between Liebe Güte and ach je
0 votes

Since this question is about word usage, an addition: "Liebe Güte" or "Meine Güte" is frequently used sarcastically or ironically to indicate that something, despite appearances, is not actually a big ...

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