Hackworth
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What’s the difference between “Ich habe dich lieb” and “Ich liebe dich”?
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91 votes

“Ich liebe dich” is stronger and more profound than “Ich habe dich lieb”. The difference is hard, if not impossible, to translate to English, or only with some extra language acrobatics; but in German,...

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What is the difference between "ist" and "es"?
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21 votes

"Ist" is 3rd person present tense of the verb "sein", English translation "to be (He, She, or It is)". "Es" is the 3rd person singular personal pronoun, English translation "it". There is no ...

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What does "das wäre aber nicht nötig gewesen" mean?
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20 votes

It's a phrase to express gratitude. It is an indirect acknowledgment that you intended the gift as a gift, and not for satisfying a perceived necessity ("nötig" comes from "Not", English "need" or "...

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What is the meaning of the dative in this sentence: "Dem Tod die Toten."
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17 votes

It means "the dead to Death", or slightly longer "The dead should belong to Death", i.e., the narrator argues that grief for the dead should be treated wisely so it does not take the grieving as ...

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Why is “alle” used in “Diese Busse fahren *alle* fünfzehn Minuten” instead of “jede”?
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16 votes

You use alle for "15 minutes" because "minutes" is plural. You would use jede for singulars, like jede halbe Stunde. You could not use them vice-versa.

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How does one say "Politically Correct" in German?
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15 votes

It's exactly the same meaning and usage. In fact, the words have been translated literally, the meaning imported into German from English. I don't know about the English connotation, but in German, it ...

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"was ist der Unterschied" vs. "was ist die Differenz"
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15 votes

"Differenz" is strictly a mathematical term. It is the quantitative difference between two numbers: Was ist die Differenz von 9 und 3? Antwort: 6 whereas "Unterschied" typically ...

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Was macht es so schwierig die deutsche Sprache zu lernen? / Why is German so hard to learn?
14 votes

Besonders schwer im Vergleich zu welcher Sprache, und für welche Muttersprache des/der Lernenden? Ein paar Aspekte, warum ich Deutsch nicht gerade für eine besonders schwer erlernbare Sprache halte: ...

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Meaning of the "Schnee von gestern" as an idiom
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14 votes

It does mean exactly what you suspect, old news. It has a humorous, yet somewhat defensive connotation, like when someone calls you out on something unfavorable and you are trying to downplay the ...

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"Duzen" or "Siezen", when addressing two or more people
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14 votes

Several possibilities there: You can ask the child in a cutesy tone (Duzen), if it's a rather young child. The mother will probably smile from ear to ear and wait for the kid to answer, or eventually ...

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Is something "kaputt" just broken or completely ruined?
13 votes

You would call something "kaputt" if it can no longer serve its main purpose because of wear or external damage, and if it is more economical to replace that item (or have it repaired by someone) ...

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Meaning of "mach, dass..."
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12 votes

"Mach, dass (etwas passiert)" is a strong request for someone else to make something happen as soon as possible. It carries a sense of urgency and possibly authority that forbids objection or even ...

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Difference between "Jägermeister" and "Waidmann"
12 votes

They both mean the same thing, a hunter. According to Wikipedia, a Jägermeister was quite literally a master hunter. Note, though, that today, under pretty much all circumstances, "Jägermeister" will ...

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What is the German equivalent of the English "aka"?
12 votes

The literal translation would be "Meier, auch bekannt als Müller" or "Meier, auch bekannt unter dem Namen Müller" or "Meier, genannt Müller". You could also say "Meier alias Müller", but that often ...

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What Are Ways to Say "Out of Date" In German?
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12 votes

I would translate never out of date as unvergänglich: Mondschein und Liebeslieder sind unvergänglich It sounds more natural and poetic than "niemals vergangen" and generally has a quite positive ...

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What is the German word for a "SQL lookup table"?
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11 votes

Wikipedia says Lookup-Tabelle, translating only half the word. That is not uncommon in IT language, where English is the de-facto standard. If you want/need an all-German term, I would propose ...

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What is the best way to say "Thanks for reminding me"?
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11 votes

While "best" is subjective and depends on the circumstances, all your examples are correct and idiomatic. Although, since you mentioned it's a formal e-mail, you probably wouldn't address the ...

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Does "sollen" imply an external agent?
11 votes

You are right, "Ich soll mehr Deutsch sprechen" is best translated as "I'm supposed to be speaking more German", which implies someone else is encouraging you. If you mean to say "I should speak more ...

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Which spelling is the right one: "deinstallieren" or "desinstallieren"?
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10 votes

Deinstallieren/Deinstallation is correct - the confusion might come from Desinformieren/Desinformation (disinformation)

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"I am awesome like that"
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9 votes

I would translate it like that: A: Wow, hast Du Dein 1 Jahr altes Konto gelöscht? B: Ja, weil ich halt so geil/cool/genial/... bin. (hopefully in an ironic meaning!) and C: Das war so eine gute ...

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What is the most accurate English translation of 'Stromkern'?
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9 votes

Seeing how Stromkern is making (partially) Electro music, the literal translation "Power Core" seems obvious. While almost any word has context-sensitive meanings, I wouldn't say either Strom or Kern ...

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Is there a translation for "solitary work" without negative connotation (side meaning)?
9 votes

I would either say eigenständige Arbeit or Soloprojekt, if it's a project.

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Why does "fliegen" not always happen in the air?
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9 votes

You answered your own question. It can be used figuratively to describe a rapid movement (not necessarily airborne) or, more abstract, a rapid change of a situation. You already provided a nice, ...

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What is a good translation of "Rüstzeit"?
9 votes

How about Retooling time? Retooling is the process of equipping a machine, factory, etc., with new, or different components.

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"Wir nachverfolgen unseren Müll nicht" Jargon oder Grammatikfehler?
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8 votes

Das ist ein Grammatikfehler. Es sollte heißen: Wir verfolgen unseren Müll nicht nach. obwohl ich das immer noch als Stilblüte betrachten würde. Am besten fände ich: Wir verfolgen den (...

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Gegenteil von Apotheose?
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8 votes

In the religious context, I would use Menschwerdung, Fleischwerdung or Inkarnation, the last of which has Latin roots.

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Ein digitales Foto "teilen" (vom Englischen to share)
8 votes

Geteiltes Leid ist halbes Leid, geteilte Freude ist doppelte Freude Dieses Sprichwort deutet recht gut die entgegengesetzten Bedeutungen des Verbs teilen an. Wenn man eine Emotion, oder allgemeiner ...

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What defines the use of the "in-/un-" prefix for building the inversion?
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8 votes

A pretty good rule of thumb is whether the word to be negated is a Fremdwort or not. Latin words are inverted with in-, Greek words are negated with a-, while typical German words are inverted with un-...

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How is the cliched plot device of 'not realising a Dr. is female' interpreted in German, where it would be obvious?
8 votes

Not sure about that plot device, but it should work the same in German. Yes, there is Doktor and Doktorin in principle, but Doktorin is rarely used. In practice, when addressing either male or ...

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Ungeziefer and its meanings and connotations
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7 votes

Nowadays there is zero religious connotation with that word, simple as that. It's clearly understood as vermin, no more and no less. In the Third Reich, calling Jews "Ungeziefer" was part of the ...

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