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Both my parents were born in Germany and came to the US, when they were five years old. They spoke German to each other but not with us kids.

Now, I got my first job out of school and bought a Porsche. My father called it a cock wagon. While this term is sometimes used in English (see here and here), I do not think that he meant this but rather was translating a German word.

What word could this be?

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    It seems to me that you want to know if there is a corresponding German expression to the English expression "cock wagon" that your father used. If it is not relevant to the question that his first language is German, then please delete that part. If you think that it is relevant, then please detail how so. – Carsten S Nov 11 '15 at 18:07
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    Wenn der Ausdruck bedeutet was ich meine, dann halte ich die Frage für begründet, als sich eine Übersetzung schlecht in Wörterbüchern finden lassen könnte. Geprüft habe ich das freilich nicht. Reopen! Carsten S' Anforderung, die Frage nicht unnötig durch Rauschen zu begleiten schließe ich mich jedoch an. – user unknown Nov 12 '15 at 1:24
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    I edited your question and took some guesses as to what you are asking. Please check whether everything is still according to your intentions. – Wrzlprmft Nov 12 '15 at 8:41
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    It's time that we can upvote edits. +1 for @Wrzlprmft. ;) – Em1 Nov 12 '15 at 8:55
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    Protzerauto oder Protzerkarre – äüö Nov 12 '15 at 13:56
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I think what your father was getting at was the German word Schwanzersatz, penis substitute. It is a fairly common expression of envy to suggest that someone with a Porsche has a small penis, and tries to compensate with a fast/flashy car, to attract women, of course.

A different term used in a similar way would be Aufreißerwagen, where aufreißen means to catch the attention of someone, in a romantic or sexual way.

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    While Schwanzersatz certainly conveys the idea, it is applicable for other gadgets, too (like cutting-edge cell phones). A term with a narrower focus would be Potenzhobel (virility plow) that only applies to cars. – collapsar Nov 12 '15 at 10:04
  • @collapsar: Hast Du schon "Schwanzersatz" oder "Penisverlängerung" für Iphone gehört? – user unknown Nov 12 '15 at 16:23
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    @userunknown Nein, aber für die Top-Handys der Baureihen Nokia 20xx/27xx (iirc) und Motorola Razr. Für iPhones erwarte ich auch nicht, Schwanzersatz zu hören, denn dafür sind sie zu verbreitet. – collapsar Nov 12 '15 at 16:59
  • aufreißen might also mean angeben "gloat, boast" (cp. einen Aufriss machen ca. "make a fuzz", "big fudge", not to be confused with Aufrisszeichnung "sketch, plan" (whence sketchy?)). I think your allusion of cock car to the male member is interesting, cocky, but somewhat misleading and ultimately ha(h)nebüchend It could be spot-on for the intention in question, though. – vectory Jan 27 '19 at 14:30
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There is no similar sounding German expression that would fit to the context your father gave.

Sometimes we refer to over-designed sports cars owned by a certain male population as Potenzschlitten in colloquial slang. This may come close to the English term.

A better accepted not so rude term would be Angeberauto:

Die futuristische Version vom Angeberauto: ein Lamborghini Aventador Roadster.Focus
4er BMW: Angeberautofaz

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"Schwanzverlängerung".

This translates to "cock extension" and is one of the more commonly heard phrases to convey what the OP was asking for.

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May be you would better not have been asking. I can tell you the answer if you don’t be afraid to hear it.

(Probably you won’t drive your Porsche again without becoming blush for shame and you might think about of rather selling it. But not to me.)

We have a perfect term that names it well and brings the things to the point!

When we are overtaken on driving by a porsche and he speeds off my wife uses to say to me:

”E lueg doch mal, das Schnäbi!” (Hey, look at this pretty little cock)

(Whereby Schnäbi means in German “Schnäbelein” or better “Schnäbelchen” which is the diminutive of “Schnabel” and names the little pecker of a boy! The pecker ...of which is to say: the pecker is the opposite end of a cock, as if the tail of a cock is -let’s say the left end, that’s also called cock, then the pecker is the right end of a cock, what doesn’t mean that a cock has two cocks! Perhaps “pecker” is a little too big to translate “Schnäbelein”, as this might rather fit for a wren, let’s say a speckle-breasted wren, or a black-bellied wren, or may be better a bar-winged wood-wren, or even better a chestnut-banded wren, no: a happy wren! That’s it! Perhaps you prefer to look up yourself all the wrens and decide which one might fit as the best. And don’t forget to spelling the latin names as there are pheugopedius sclateri, thyrothorus fasciathoventris, henicorhina leucoptera etcetera,etcetera ... you have to learn them all by heart!

https://www.dict.cc/?s=Zaunk%C3%B6nig

Mind: Most important is, it has to be a very, very little bird! The most pretty little bird of all!)

But when my wife gets really very, very angry and upset about an overtaking porsche driver she is insulting and offending: “So-ne Gigu!”

(what means exactly what you are looking for!)

And now I need a cock-tail!

I think I have to stop now ere they are going to on hold my answer - calling me an “Unhold”!

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    Der Gimpel hat den kleinsten. – Janka Jan 27 '19 at 12:31
  • I didn't know that Schnäbi meant, let's say, "penis" in dialect. Are you just guessing? Schnabel chiefly means "bill, beak" (which snaps?). pecker is a neat allusion, but I'm inclined to believe that your proposition is common because I know Schniepel ca. "nipple, snippit, lip [e.g of a tetra-pack]" but definitely "penis". Your allusion to tail feathers is confusing, but understandable comparing pencil, penis, feather etc. Now what about Schnaps, cock-tail? Does someone have something on Rot-Schwanz, Fink, wing, Schwinge? – vectory Jan 27 '19 at 16:34
  • no, I'm not guessing.That's the first word that a child learns after mama and papa! srf.ch/kultur/film-serien/trigger-kurzfilm-der-woche/… voltafilm.ch/de/film/schn%C3%A4bi/video that's definitely the expression for the penis and has no negative meaning for a little boy, but when calling adults like this it's a blaming – Albrecht Hügli Jan 27 '19 at 16:37
  • Remembered your answer when I saw शिश्न (śiśna "penis")--Maybe related to Schnäbli? The si- could be explained as childish reduplication as in Pipi, Mama, etc. The missing "-bel, -bli" would be harder to explain. Synonymous Hindi बुल्ला (bullā) comes to mind, along with Lt. phallus (also Ger. Pulla, Romanian pula?); and bill (beak)? Analogous, Bock in "kein Bock" could be from Sanskrit "hunger", through Romani and Rothwelsch; well it seems fantastic. Speculated as source for an Albanian term. The root might mean "to pierce". – vectory Feb 3 '19 at 21:09
  • I'd consider the roots PIE *swen- "power, might" (*swent?) and *bhel-~*bhle- or *bhu- "blow, swell". But I really don't know enough to substantiate that claim. – vectory Feb 3 '19 at 21:13

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