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1

Angebracht war das Duzen in diesem Fall ganz sicher nicht. Ich würde es aber - noch - als Ausnahme werten. Allerdings unterliegt das "Sie" einem starken Erosionsprozess. Unter jungen Leuten (das möchte ich jetzt nicht mit einer Alterszahl präzisieren) ist es seit langem fast völlig verschwunden. Ich erinnere mich an ein Gespräch (ca. 1980) mit ...


4

Given, that there are only two possibilities and a simple yes/no answer is everything required, I find the question neither impolite nor unusual - you are free to order with all details. I also hear für hier/ zum hier essen (in case of a cake) and don't recognize zum Mitnehmen? as a proposal, that the cashier prefers to see you leaving. Similarly, when ...


5

The content of the question is perfectly polite. That is, whether they ask for the "stay" or the "leave" option does not imply a difference in politeness (or even hospitality) at all, in my opinion. In fast food places (like McDonald's, as you suggested) or downtown cafés, I would indeed expect the cashier to ask immediately whether it is ...


0

No, the entire behaviour is not perfectly polite. As you elaborated yourself, people are people. And having an "abruptly saying without smile" also indicates that the cashier is currently not perfectly polite. Nonetheless: Asking only "Zum mitnehmen?" is quite enough as this mirrors the expectations of the cashier – that the majority ...


11

It is polite or at least not impolite because they don't ask out of personal interest. In Germany it makes a difference if you eat/drink in a cafe or take it to go, because both options come with different taxes for the cafe. That means the cashier will need to enter this information while handling the register. Take it as German efficiency, if you like, ...


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