New answers tagged

1

Vor einem anderen her fahren means "to drive in front of somebody", typically leading the way. Vor einem anderen [irgendwohin] fahren is typically understood to mean a temporal "before". So if I say Ich fahre vor Paul her nach Rom. That means that I lead the way to our destination Rome and he drives right behind me. Ich fahre vor Paul ...


0

But the DW sentence interpreted in the same way would say, "The restrictions for work in the embassies is accompanied by the classification." The causality of this sentence appears to be reversed from what it should be. What is the explanation? The explanation is that your translation is reversed from what it should be. The original sentence is ...


3

Wiktionary A good resource is wiktionary: andern anderen It lists »anderen«, »andern« and »andren« as Nebenformen (in English: variant) of each other, which mean, all three form are correct and mean the same. But there is no distinct entry for »andren«. This means, that it is not used very often. Google ngram viewer If you want to find out how the ...


2

The order or structure of the arguments of einhergehen does not imply any causal relationship, only a correlation: Regen geht oft mit Nässe einher. Nässe geht oft mit Regen einher. Furthermore, due to the flexible word order of German, you can put the mit-Part in the front: Mit Nässe geht oft Regen einher. Mit Regen geht oft Nässe einher. without any ...


0

The word "Unfreude" would cover it, but I'm not sure that is already an accepted German word. I used it myself without giving it much thought. It sort of made sense surfacing all by itself in my quadralingual head when the need for it came up. It appeared to be clearly understood strange enough, but someone said it wasn't German.


4

mit vs. von The use of mit comes from bedrohen itself, while von comes from the passive voice. It's not an either-or relationship, because they are not mutually exclusive and have different meanings. Let's start with the active voice first. In the simplest case, we have neither mit nor von: Der Räuber bedroht den Kasper. The robber threatens Kasper. (...


3

I am a bit puzzled by your question, because English makes the same distinction: He was threatened with a gun. Er wurde mit einer Waffe bedroht. but He was threatened by Peter. Er wurde von Peter bedroht. The semantic distinction is that the first form states what he was threatened with, whereas the second form states who was doing the threatening. ...


2

"To threaten with" is "bedrohen mit", yes, but this here is simply the normal "von" construction for a passive, independent of the particular verb: They're not threatened with, but by poverty and social exclusion. ("Sinken um" also is "drop by", not "to".)


5

Mindestens bis zum Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts scheint obliegen ausschließlich als trennbares Verb gebraucht worden zu sein. So verzeichnen es die Brüder Grimm im Deutschen Wörterbuch, wobei sie u.a. Fundstellen bei Goethe, Schiller und Wieland anführen. DWDS kennt darüber hinaus Fundstellen bei Rathenau (1918) und Emil Strauß (1919), sodass diese Verwendung ...


9

Der Duden kennzeichnet die getrennte Form als veraltend oder veraltet. Das entspricht auch meinem Sprachgefühl. Auszug aus obigem Link: Rechtschreibung INFO Worttrennung: ob|lie|gen Beispiele: es obliegt, oblag mir, es ist mir oblegen; zu obliegen, veraltend auch es liegt, lag mir ob; es hat mir obgelegen; obzuliegen


-5

To my knowledge "vorglühen" finds its origin in the tourist culture in German speaking areas of the Alps. It is the result of cross breading a German drink with a Scandinavian habit. The drink is called "Glühwein", which is a very common alcoholic beverage served hot. Being also somewhat of a street food drink, it is often the first ...


29

"Vorglühen" literally means "pre-glow" or "pre-ignite". The term describes the pre-heating phase when cold-starting old diesel engines. In your context it's a slang term for the practice of drinking/sharing store-bought alcoholic beverages at home before going to a bar or club, where alcohol is much more expensive (hence "...


0

Die Redewendung dürfte aus dem Englischen entlehnt sein. Wie HalvarF in seiner Antwort ausführt, ist der deutsche Ausdruck "niedrig hängende Früchte" vor dem Jahr 2000 praktisch nicht zu finden. Insbesondere dieser Artikel unterstützt die Vermutung, dass der Begriff aus dem Englischen stammt: "Low-hanging fruit" refers to what's easily ...


2

It's one of the cases where the languages don't quite correspond to each other. There is no verb wettbewerben in the German language. The German near equivalents are emphasizing slightly different aspects. The difference is most pronounced in the first bullet point below. "to compete [in a tournament etc.]", without a prepositional object: The ...


3

Es dürfte schwer nachzuweisen sein, welchen Weg das Idiom genommen hat. Die Suche nach "hängende Früchte" in den verschiedenen DWDS-Korpora vermittelt aber den Eindruck, dass es im Deutschen neu ist. https://www.dwds.de/r/?corpus=public&q=h%C3%A4ngende%20Fr%C3%BCchte In den Korpora, die vor 2000 enden, ist "niedrig hängende Früchte" ...


23

"Antreten" doesn't mean "to compete" directly. The meaning in this context is more like "to enter (a competition)", "to show up (for a match)", "to step up (to the opponent)" or "to report (for taking an exam)". It might help to note that having a group of soldiers to form up is called "...


1

I speak German .. and since I read many books all my life, I can also distinguish between dialect and "high" German, the official one. But fair to say, that it is a living language, much more than eg French. Ellebogen is actually hard-core dialect (eg Cologne region), Ellbogen is often used for longer words ( Ellbogengesellschaft = community ...


2

The difference between "endlich" and "schließlich" is mostly on the emotional level. If you're emotionally invested and then finally, finally something happens, you'd use "endlich". You can image a sigh of relief with it ;) On the other hand, "schließlich" is much more neutral emotionally. You're reporting that ...


4

You can use both, I would use schießlich in this context, but it's close and you should probably not worry about it. Schließlich (ultimately, in the end) is fitting here because it's about the conclusion of the process of searching in a third-person perspective. Endlich (finally, at last) takes a personal perspective, it's always about a hope being finally ...


2

I would say that endlich is rather used for cases where you wait for something, and it finally happens. Schließlich is okay in your case, but I'd suggest to use "schlussendlich", which fits even better in my opinion: Schlussendlich fand sie ihn. Please also be aware that in the first sentence, there are some mistakes: Agnes, die beim ersten ...


3

in ↔︎ im The word »im« is a contraction of the preposition »in« and the article »dem«. So, the difference between »in« and »im« is the presence of an article, and this is also the reason why »im« works only in dative case, only in singular, only for masculine and neuter nouns, and only if you talk about a certain thing ("definite" i.e. not about ...


4

"Bärendienst" is somewhat old-fashioned. "einen schlechten Dienst erweisen" is possible, but also sounds a bit old-fashioned. I would probably say "jemandem keinen Gefallen tun": "Wenn man die Studenten nachsichtig behandelt tut man ihnen damit keinen Gefallen."


7

Der "Bärendienst" ist schon genau der richtige Ausdruck. jemandem einen Bärendienst erweisen/leisten (in guter Absicht etwas tun, was einem anderen, zu dessen Nutzen es gedacht war, schadet; vielleicht nach der Fabel „Der Bär und der Gartenliebhaber“ von La Fontaine, in der der Bär diensteifrig eine Fliege von der Nase des Gärtners verscheucht, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included