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Why sagen, erklären, erzählen are dative verbs? why Lieben is not a dative verb?

I understand that sagen, erklären, erzählen are dative verbs But they aren't! Check out these examples: Er sagt etwas. ← That's an accusative object. Sie erklärt den Ablauf. ← Clearly an accusative ...
Janka's user avatar
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Why sagen, erklären, erzählen are dative verbs? why Lieben is not a dative verb?

sagen, erklären and erzählen are transitive verbs and thus take an accusative object. It is just not the receiver of the said/explained/told thing. The receiver is denoted as a dative object, and is ...
king_nak's user avatar
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5 votes

Why sagen, erklären, erzählen are dative verbs? why Lieben is not a dative verb?

One (actually, one of the main, and actually its literal) purposes of the dative is denoting "giving something to someone". The notion of "giving" is interpreted very widely in ...
tofro's user avatar
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4 votes

Mnemonic for genitive prepositions

I came across this in an old grammar book. But keep in mind that what was genitive 50 years ago may be dative now. Unweit, mittels, kraft und während, Laut, vermöge, ungeachtet, Oberhalb und ...
RDBury's user avatar
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Mnemonic for genitive prepositions

There is the traditional brain walking aid Oberhalb und unterhalb, innerhalb und außerhalb, trotz, unweit, während, wegen, statt den 2. Fall stets bei sich hat. Which is, however, incomplete (...
tofro's user avatar
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1 vote

Why do we use accusative case after the preposition "über"?

In German, it's always important to tell apart locations and directions. E.g. with über die Brücke you give a direction rather than a location, as the two-way preposition über indicates a direction ...
Janka's user avatar
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Why do we use accusative case after the preposition "über"?

The preposition über is a so-called Wechselpräposition. That is, depending on context, it can be used with dative case (to indicate a location) or with accusative case (to indicate a direction). Often,...
Björn Friedrich's user avatar

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